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post #9871 of 18446
The problem with a sheepskin was that you dare not take it off. It was bad enough with a Crombie.

People wore coats to dancehalls in those days. There were cloakrooms and they gave you a little ticket, but if you did not get your own coat at the end of the night there was no real comeback, no liability. Then there were places that did not have cloakroom attendants, That was just asking for trouble.

'The Big Red Building in Petticoat Lane' was a memorable radio jingle for a famous sheepskin outlet. Would have been early 70s though - so past the boom era.
post #9872 of 18446
Regarding what Ace of Eights said about the smell and buzz of the 60s/70, When the Squire shop opened in Brewer St here in London, I always worked in the West End.. so i would always pop in, I remember the smell of the place, I still can over Forty years later, The layout of the shop was different from any other cloths shop at the time..The Shirts, Jumpers was on shelves so you could pick them up and have a good look, The Royals was on a Table in the Middle of the shop, and the bag you got with your new bit of kit was unique, What a lot of Skinheads would do was have another bag to put your newly bought clobber in, so as not to attract attention to ones self, Groups of skinheads would wait for a single lad coming out of the shop and take his hard earn Royals of him.

Going into George the Tailor's [ he was Indian] on Kilburn High Road on a Saturday...it would be full of Skinhead Boys and Girls, It was chaos in there, He would be measuring Lads and Girls one after another on his own, I thought at the time hope he gets mine right, Never had a problem. I was 15 looking in the Dormueil Sample book, choosing what you wanted.. A deposit was paid and then the balance was paid 10 shillings a week.a few weeks later you had your suit, We all worked so getting a suit was easy..some lads had three or four, i had Two, a dark blue Kid Mohair.. the other was Kid Mohair Bottle Green with a Red pinstripe, no one had anything like it , I was so proud.

I would get home from Football on a Saturday, My Brother had already took all the Hot water having a bath, No central heating back then, So I would pop around to Granville Road public Baths, getting back home Mum always had a fry up on a Saturday evening.. with Chips, She made the most wonderful chips, I can smell them now, My Mum would always iron my Older brothers Shirts... but i always did my own,
Shoes was always polished so they would be ready. I would be out the house for 7...straight over the road to the pub, see the Old Man...then off up the High Road to meet the lads, We would meet in the Coopers Arms.. if it was a Summer evening all the Skinheads would be standing outside, No one ever sat down, only the scruffy cnuts did lol. You would walk towards them in your suit, they would give you the once over...girls would often comment how smart you looked, anyone not wearing the correct kit had the piss taken out of them. Once everyone was there we would make our way to the Tube station, seeing maybe forty Boys and Girls walking up the High road was a sight to see, Girls linked up to their Boyfriends, some with matching suits, half the lads wearing Sunglasses, a few wearing pork pie hats, Getting on the train no one sits down, I will not continue the story as it always ended in a fight and tears,biggrin.gif
Those couple of years was the best days of my life.
post #9873 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

Regarding what Ace of Eights said about the smell and buzz of the 60s/70, When the Squire shop opened in Brewer St here in London, I always worked in the West End.. so i would always pop in, I remember the smell of the place, I still can over Forty years later, The layout of the shop was different from any other cloths shop at the time..The Shirts, Jumpers was on shelves so you could pick them up and have a good look, The Royals was on a Table in the Middle of the shop, and the bag you got with your new bit of kit was unique, What a lot of Skinheads would do was have another bag to put your newly bought clobber in, so as not to attract attention to ones self, Groups of skinheads would wait for a single lad coming out of the shop and take his hard earn Royals of him.
Going into George the Tailor's [ he was Indian] on Kilburn High Road on a Saturday...it would be full of Skinhead Boys and Girls, It was chaos in there, He would be measuring Lads and Girls one after another on his own, I thought at the time hope he gets mine right, Never had a problem. I was 15 looking in the Dormueil Sample book, choosing what you wanted.. A deposit was paid and then the balance was paid 10 shillings a week.a few weeks later you had your suit, We all worked so getting a suit was easy..some lads had three or four, i had Two, a dark blue Kid Mohair.. the other was Kid Mohair Bottle Green with a Red pinstripe, no one had anything like it , I was so proud.
I would get home from Football on a Saturday, My Brother had already took all the Hot water having a bath, No central heating back then, So I would pop around to Granville Road public Baths, getting back home Mum always had a fry up on a Saturday evening.. with Chips, She made the most wonderful chips, I can smell them now, My Mum would always iron my Older brothers Shirts... but i always did my own,
Shoes was always polished so they would be ready. I would be out the house for 7...straight over the road to the pub, see the Old Man...then off up the High Road to meet the lads, We would meet in the Coopers Arms.. if it was a Summer evening all the Skinheads would be standing outside, No one ever sat down, only the scruffy cnuts did lol. You would walk towards them in your suit, they would give you the once over...girls would often comment how smart you looked, anyone not wearing the correct kit had the piss taken out of them. Once everyone was there we would make our way to the Tube station, seeing maybe forty Boys and Girls walking up the High road was a sight to see, Girls linked up to their Boyfriends, some with matching suits, half the lads wearing Sunglasses, a few wearing pork pie hats, Getting on the train no one sits down, I will not continue the story as it always ended in a fight and tears,biggrin.gif
Those couple of years was the best days of my life.
I pictured the scene as I read your post - great stuff, makes me nostalgic despite it not being my own personal memory. nod[1].gif

Wish I could do it all again. (I reckon I'd change sod-all, BTW.)
post #9874 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

Regarding what Ace of Eights said about the smell and buzz of the 60s/70, When the Squire shop opened in Brewer St here in London, I always worked in the West End.. so i would always pop in, I remember the smell of the place, I still can over Forty years later, The layout of the shop was different from any other cloths shop at the time..The Shirts, Jumpers was on shelves so you could pick them up and have a good look, The Royals was on a Table in the Middle of the shop, and the bag you got with your new bit of kit was unique, What a lot of Skinheads would do was have another bag to put your newly bought clobber in, so as not to attract attention to ones self, Groups of skinheads would wait for a single lad coming out of the shop and take his hard earn Royals of him.
Going into George the Tailor's [ he was Indian] on Kilburn High Road on a Saturday...it would be full of Skinhead Boys and Girls, It was chaos in there, He would be measuring Lads and Girls one after another on his own, I thought at the time hope he gets mine right, Never had a problem. I was 15 looking in the Dormueil Sample book, choosing what you wanted.. A deposit was paid and then the balance was paid 10 shillings a week.a few weeks later you had your suit, We all worked so getting a suit was easy..some lads had three or four, i had Two, a dark blue Kid Mohair.. the other was Kid Mohair Bottle Green with a Red pinstripe, no one had anything like it , I was so proud.
I would get home from Football on a Saturday, My Brother had already took all the Hot water having a bath, No central heating back then, So I would pop around to Granville Road public Baths, getting back home Mum always had a fry up on a Saturday evening.. with Chips, She made the most wonderful chips, I can smell them now, My Mum would always iron my Older brothers Shirts... but i always did my own,
Shoes was always polished so they would be ready. I would be out the house for 7...straight over the road to the pub, see the Old Man...then off up the High Road to meet the lads, We would meet in the Coopers Arms.. if it was a Summer evening all the Skinheads would be standing outside, No one ever sat down, only the scruffy cnuts did lol. You would walk towards them in your suit, they would give you the once over...girls would often comment how smart you looked, anyone not wearing the correct kit had the piss taken out of them. Once everyone was there we would make our way to the Tube station, seeing maybe forty Boys and Girls walking up the High road was a sight to see, Girls linked up to their Boyfriends, some with matching suits, half the lads wearing Sunglasses, a few wearing pork pie hats, Getting on the train no one sits down, I will not continue the story as it always ended in a fight and tears,biggrin.gif
Those couple of years was the best days of my life.

This is such a typical description of what it was like 40 odd years ago for a skinhead.  We were miles away from each other, spread all over the country and yet we done the same things, wore the same clothes and had the same thoughts - and probably the same laughs !!

 

Small world really

 

Nowadays I am shower, shave and haircut and out the door.  Back then shoes had to be polished and placed in line - all clothes had to be inspected and tweaks made before deciding what to wear  - had to be smart

 

Talking of smells - I can still remember my first whiff of Brut  - I thought it was magic and still do.  all skinheads smelt of this.  unfortunately Henry Cooper spoiled it when he advertised it on TV and the general public got hold of it and it was then ruined as it had been our smell - our secret.

 

I remember the first Levis I bought and the feel - the quality has never been challenged.  The rich gold colour of the stitching - the symmetrical design whereby the belt loops just seemed correct - small touches like that gave the original Levis the edge that has survived.  Is it me or did the original Levis raise up at the rear belt line? - I am sure they did - do they still?  I have not had a pair of Levis for years 

 

A popular drink for the girls back then was Rum & Black and you was always wary of them spilling it as the blackcurrant was impossible to get removed from your clothes.  They learned it was a good way of keeping you a safe distance from them !!

post #9875 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingstonian View Post

The problem with a sheepskin was that you dare not take it off. It was bad enough with a Crombie.
People wore coats to dancehalls in those days. There were cloakrooms and they gave you a little ticket, but if you did not get your own coat at the end of the night there was no real comeback, no liability. Then there were places that did not have cloakroom attendants, That was just asking for trouble.
'The Big Red Building in Petticoat Lane' was a memorable radio jingle for a famous sheepskin outlet. Would have been early 70s though - so past the boom era.

I can't recall ever taking any of my top coats off whatever pub / dancehall I went to - no one could be trusted

post #9876 of 18446

A subject I don't think we have touched on yet is the various sayings we used back then.

 

Alright - was always a way of greeting your mates - it was said as a statement rather than expecting an answer to if you was alright!!

 

Like - this was seemed to be used after everything you said ie "the pubs open like" - completely pointless comprehension/grammar but it separated us from general public / older people

 

Know what I mean - still used to day and again said after most items of conversation sentences and really like stating the 'bleeding obvious' as you were only talking to you mates and they would have been the only humans who knew what we were talking about back then as we tried to be cut of from other groups of people and adults

 

Sorts - term for girls.  as in 'she's a good sort'  I particularly liked this description as i used to refer to my girlfriends as my 'sort' - a term of affection and pride - possibly others may disagree.

 

There must be loads more out there from back in our day but these are the most prominent that come to mind

post #9877 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

We would meet in the Coopers Arms.. if it was a Summer evening all the Skinheads would be standing outside, No one ever sat down, only the scruffy cnuts did lol. You would walk towards them in your suit, they would give you the once over...girls would often comment how smart you looked, anyone not wearing the correct kit had the piss taken out of them. Once everyone was there we would make our way to the Tube station, seeing maybe forty Boys and Girls walking up the High road was a sight to see, Girls linked up to their Boyfriends, some with matching suits, half the lads wearing Sunglasses, a few wearing pork pie hats, Getting on the train no one sits down, I will not continue the story as it always ended in a fight and tears,biggrin.gif
Those couple of years was the best days of my life.

The Coopers was one of the better pubs on Kilburn High Street. It stayed open a half hour later than the other side of the road I think - different boroughs, different opening times. The Youngs pub was OK in those days. The Cock was a bit of a roughhouse and Biddy's was Watneys.
post #9878 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aces and Eights View Post

I can't recall ever taking any of my top coats off whatever pub / dancehall I went to - no one could be trusted

The Top Rank, Watford had a proper cloakroom with attendants. Bigger places always did. It was expected.

Down the scale, a school dance would have somewhere to leave your coats but no attendants.
post #9879 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingstonian View Post

The Coopers was one of the better pubs on Kilburn High Street. It stayed open a half hour later than the other side of the road I think - different boroughs, different opening times. The Youngs pub was OK in those days. The Cock was a bit of a roughhouse and Biddy's was Watneys.

Spot on Kingstonian, The Cooper's Arms was on the Camden side of the high road.. the other side came under Brent, where the pubs closed at 10: 30pm, I was in the Coopers a few months back, its not changes in Forty odd years.biggrin.gif

The Top Rank Watford...Like the Tottenham Royal had cloakrooms, I still never trusted them... One Crombie looks just like another except the quality of course. did not want to get given a market one back by mistake, biggrin.gif
post #9880 of 18446

Great stuff guys.Love the family references.Lasttye,love the image of your mom's fantastic chips and the Saturday fry up before going out on the town.Thanks.

post #9881 of 18446
Okay, kids, in the light of what superb, historical memories just enjoyed - and bearing in mind I'm just back from the 'battle-cruiser' (see, you southern chaps, Scotland is/was a great source of rhyming slang, too) nod[1].gif can I raise the word: graffiti'?

Did you?

Where did you do it and, what was it?

I have tales, of a pal (RIP), who was prolific in proclaiming his love - not for a football team, nor a lifestyle - but for a bird, across south Manchester - in acrylic paint. And he really, really loved this dodgy boiler.

His actions - not just in having nicked the paint from garages, spares' shops and DIY shops (of which there were few, back in the day) - had me stabbed (seriously), bottled - still have the scar and feel it in cold weather - and a criminal record, through knocking about with him and 'rattling' (you know what I mean) her mother.

To us - just us? - it was probably (psychologists will concur, I reckon) like a dog/cat, beast of the field, just marking its' territory - and they may not be too far wrong in that hypothesis.

To us, it was (the graffiti)... saying, stay away. Everything you see - birds, pubs, clubs and territory - is 'ours'.

Unlike West Side Story, and even kids today who can't/won't cross borders.. we all did cross boundaries if there was the hint of a bit of - ladies, please forgive my crudeness... some 'flange'. to be had.

A bit of 'how's yer father' was, sometimes, worth the risk - no?

Can I pause here and later, tell you of my pal. Skinny Den (RIP), and how we woooed(!!!) - and kept - our girlies?
Edited by Ed Vaughan - 12/15/12 at 7:25pm
post #9882 of 18446

Intriguing subject the graffiti Ed.Would def like to hear more from folks about it.The original Modernists FB page dumped me cause I disagreed with them on Atlantic records.At least you guys never did that (even though it's been warranted a few times)Good day folks.

post #9883 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankmod View Post

Intriguing subject the graffiti Ed.Would def like to hear more from folks about it.The original Modernists FB page dumped me cause I disagreed with them on Atlantic records.At least you guys never did that (even though it's been warranted a few times)Good day folks.

C'mon, you cant leave us with half the story. What was it you (or should that be they) said about Atlantic?

post #9884 of 18446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gramps View Post

C'mon, you cant leave us with half the story. What was it you (or should that be they) said about Atlantic?

OK Gramps.Someone posted a photo of Ahmet Ertegun and talked about what a giant he was and how great Atlantic records was.I said most(not all)the music on Atlantic was contrived,cynical and novelty(not authentic)In response someone posted about Jerry Wexler and Aretha.I responded Jerry Wexler was brilliant but a scumbag for stealing Aretha from Muscle Shoals tryin to jump on the Stax/Volt bandwagon.In an earlier post,someone mentioned the sale of the original Decca audition tapes by The Beatles being auctioned.I responded that one of the reasons Parlaphone sighned the Beatles was as a tax write off as Parlaphone had made a lot of money in the 50's with the Goons.I think the combination of these 2 responses was what did me in.I know things about the music biz most folks don't know(and don't want to know)and the Original Modernists don't want to know either.Folks don't like to know that they've been manipulated,duped,swindled.Oh Well,I slept fine last night.Sorry to go off topic but Gramps asked.

post #9885 of 18446
[/quote]deleted
Edited by Ed Vaughan - 12/17/12 at 6:25am
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