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Mod to Suedehead - Page 447

post #6691 of 19265
Having tried to put my rant of a couple of days ago behind me I must say I now feel some of my sentiments were a bit harsh - they were not intended to be offensive to anyone.

One thing I am interested in is the current discussions about how far originals go in replicating The Look today. Some posters (not necessarily originals) seem to wish to completely replicate the authentic look to the extent of limiting themselves to original pieces. Others use it more as a yardstick that helps them judge what is and is not acceptable among the huge number of different styles now available to us in 2012.

For me it has always given me a standard to aspire to even if I do not seek to embrace the entire look - like Roy and others I need to move on. I like Ed's point about neatness and cleanliness.

The other point I liked was about the clashing (if you are not careful) between the shirt and the harrington linings. I embraced 'controlled clashing' in the 80s - remember that? - and I try to apply that now to this challenge. It can work:

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post #6692 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brideshead View Post

Having tried to put my rant of a couple of days ago behind me I must say I now feel some of my sentiments were a bit harsh - they were not intended to be offensive to anyone.
One thing I am interested in is the current discussions about how far originals go in replicating The Look today. Some posters (not necessarily originals) seem to wish to completely replicate the authentic look to the extent of limiting themselves to original pieces. Others use it more as a yardstick that helps them judge what is and is not acceptable among the huge number of different styles now available to us in 2012.
For me it has always given me a standard to aspire to even if I do not seek to embrace the entire look - like Roy and others I need to move on. I like Ed's point about neatness and cleanliness.
The other point I liked was about the clashing (if you are not careful) between the shirt and the harrington linings. I embraced 'controlled clashing' in the 80s - remember that? - and I try to apply that now to this challenge. It can work:
320

I go back to what I said earlier: worn well with style, most garments can look good, but worn badly.......... one is reminded of silk purses and sow's ears.... Fine feathers may not make fine birds, but fine birds can make feathers look fine!

I have never thought a checked shirt against the tartan of a Harrington’s lining looked 'clashing'. Well pressed, smart and clean - it looks good, John.
post #6693 of 19265
Check shirts look good with Jeans or Sta Press, on their own in summer or wearing with a plain jumper or cardigan, I see a lot of present day Skinheads wearing check shirts with suits, they even have the pocket hankie made in the check shirt material.
is this a later skinhead thing?

For me only plain or striped shirts go with a suit, with a tie of course.
Another thing the wearing of hankies, a hankie does not have too match a shirt or tie colour, I can only remember two hankies in the 60s One Maroon red, that i got off the tailor from Crombie lining and a White silk one.
Regarding the wearing of studs on breast pockets, this came about as girls would pull your hankie out the pocket and throw it on the floor, hence the stud to stop this, smile.gif
post #6694 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

Check shirts look good with Jeans or Sta Press, on their own in summer or wearing with a plain jumper or cardigan, I see a lot of present day Skinheads wearing check shirts with suits, they even have the pocket hankie made in the check shirt material.
is this a later skinhead thing?

Wearing checked shirts with suits (without a tie largely) was seen as part of the original look as it moved on (I believe Brideshead has said he wore this look?) As for the hankie made from the same material, I believe it's a Southern thing.... not my cup of tea.
post #6695 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Queenie View Post

Wearing checked shirts with suits (without a tie largely) was seen as part of the original look as it moved on (I believe Brideshead has said he wore this look?) As for the hankie made from the same material, I believe it's a Southern thing.... not my cup of tea.

I had a few check shirts from the Ivy shop, but i would not wear them with a suit, Checks are casual kit, The loud check of the shirt was worn as a stand alone item to show off, Its logical you pay a fortune on a Squire shirt you want to show it off.
Lads did wear checks with their Crombies though.
post #6696 of 19265
post #6697 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Queenie View Post

Wearing checked shirts with suits (without a tie largely) was seen as part of the original look as it moved on (I believe Brideshead has said he wore this look?) As for the hankie made from the same material, I believe it's a Southern thing.... not my cup of tea.

Hi Suzie - I'm not sure I said checked (I may have done) but I did wear a plain or striped BD open under a suit by summer of 1969.

With regard to the pocket hanky I have always tried to have a coordinated rather than matching look. Back in the day colours were much more limited of course.

The tie pin or stud through the top pocket started as a necessity as Roy says. At Ilford Palais the girls were rather more sinister, stealing hankies for their 'pimp'.
post #6698 of 19265
With photographs they are the most important source as evidence of anything, however its not the whole story, the photo is that split second aimed at the people in the pic. but it does not tell the story of everyone else who was there..that split second.
Photos are put up on here and people often think well thats it, so it must be right, but what about all the other people wearing the PROPER kit off camera.

My photos of the originals are in my head.. thousands of them, i have never seen a photo of Skinheads in the Tottenham Royal, all i can say it was a scene that took your breath away, it gave you goose pimples ...seeing hundreds of Skinhead Boys and Girls suited up.
You had to be there to understand the shire scale of it all. if you took a pic of a couple of skinheads on the dance floor it could never tell you the whole story.
The great thing about this site their is a number of original skinheads who was there, each giving how they saw themselves in the 60s, Their is agreements and disagreements but by comparing notes we seem to get too what it was really like to be around over 43 years ago.
Edited by Lasttye - 3/23/12 at 7:18am
post #6699 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

With photographs they are the most important source as evidence of anything, however its not the whole story, the photo is that split second aimed at the people in the pic. but it does not tell the story of everyone else who was there..that split second.
Photos are put up on here and people often think well thats it, so it must be right, but what about all the other people wearing the PROPER kit off camera.
My photos of the originals are in my head.. thousands of them, i have never seen a photo of Skinheads in the Tottenham Royal, all i can say it was a scene that took your breath away, it gave you goose pimples ...seeing hundreds of Skinhead Boys and Girls suited up.
You had to be there to understand the shire scale of it all. if you took a pic of a couple of skinheads on the dance floor it could never tell you the whole story.
The great thing about this site their is a number of original skinheads who was there, each giving how they saw themselves in the 60s, Their is agreements and disagreements but by comparing notes we seem to get too what it was really like to be around over 43 years ago.

Ah, social diversity; and each of us (them), with a different take, on one particular 2-3 year period in the late-middle part of the 20th Century... bang-on, Roy.

Fantastic organ, the brain.

Just when you think you have had the old memory-banks wiped, never to return, someone adds their experiences to the melt and... BANG!!! - you're back, with a long-forgotten episode as clear as if it were yesterday.

For my money, a forum such as this is therapeutic. It allows to regress - a bad thing, if you have dementia/Alzheimers' - yet good, because it causes us to use the brain as the complex computer it truly is.

I'm off for a lie-down now after that. (Doubt the boss will be happy.) satisfied.gif
post #6700 of 19265
^^^ Great post Roy!

I was thinking the same only this morning. When I was still quite young and in my first MTM suit I went with a mate to Billy Walker's Uppercut club in Forest Gate? This must have been the late autumn of 1967 when things were really moving on and the scene that met us was at the same time awe-inspiring and intimidating, so well dressed was just about everyone there. And what the pics don't really reveal is just how immaculate people were.
post #6701 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post

Ah, social diversity; and each of us (them), with a different take, on one particular 2-3 year period in the late-middle part of the 20th Century... bang-on, Roy.
Fantastic organ, the brain.
Just when you think you have had the old memory-banks wiped, never to return, someone adds their experiences to the melt and... BANG!!! - you're back, with a long-forgotten episode as clear as if it were yesterday.
For my money, a forum such as this is therapeutic. It allows to regress - a bad thing, if you have dementia/Alzheimers' - yet good, because it causes us to use the brain as the complex computer it truly is.

I think reminiscence therapy is good for dementia! It helps me!!
post #6702 of 19265
post #6703 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundsnpressure View Post

Interesting to hear what the original thread starter thinks about how this thread has evolved.

 

Hi,

well to be honest, shortly after I created this thread I lost interest in all things internet while at the same time going thorugh a significant change in my life. Then having completely forgotten about not just this thread but the whole forum, a few weeks ago a  member on another clothing forum, mentioned how my thread here was still going strong. I'd forgotten it completely so I didn't even recognise my old username initially.

 

I think all discussion on the topic and closely-related topics is acceptable, as long as it remains polite.

 

However, a thread called "Traditional Skinheads"  isn't a free-for-all to start discussing all sorts of youth sub-cultures and all sorts of sub-culture clothing. The thread title is there for a reason, to inform readers that on this thread we are discussing the traditional skinhead look, be it from 1969 or 2009.   

 

 

NB: The term original skinheads tends to confuse some people into thinking we're talking about the ACTUAL people who were skinheads in 69 rather than the original look. Hence the term Traditional is better suited.  

 

Oi punks - did not wear traditional skinhead clobber, and were in essence simply punks wearing some skinhead gear, musically they had no connexion whatsoever to skinheads So for me they are outside the parameters of this thread.   

 

Mods - a lot of the mod stuff and clobber discussed here has very little to do with the traditional skinhead look, that said the orignal skinhead was in essence a hard mod and they listened to much the same music - so discussion is relevant.  THAT said, all this Mod suits, ties, scooters, and scooterboy stuff is beyond me. In West London skinheads travelled round on the bus, the tube or Ford Cortinas or similar. This scooterboy stuff for me is very much a revisionist version of skinhead history, at least as far as West London goes in the 70s becasue in the 60s and 70s the only people I saw on scooters were normal people commuting, or Mods, or in Central London the posh cafe crowd.

 

Skate punks, ska punks, HC, psychobilly, punkabilly - just because they might wear a Harrington and have cropped hair & a pair of docs doesn't make them relevant to this thread.

Bikers, greasers,rockers, teddy boys - please! Wrong forum.

 

Music: ska, reggae, soul, hard rock, glam - that's what me and my mates were listening to before that awful punk stuff  exploded like a huge pustule on the arse of British society! biggrin.gif

 

post #6704 of 19265

Have a read about this fella: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoxton_Tom_McCourt

 

He was the bass player in one of the biggest Oi bands of the skinhead revival and a very smart Skinhead turned Suedehead he was,aswell as being very into Reggae/Ska/Soul. You clearly have tarred a hell of a lot of people with the same brush.There were/are loads of very smart skinheads in the Oi scene that are also into reggae/ska/soul.Yes there were/are some scruffy fuckers and some plebs who let the side down but there are good and bad in every genre.

post #6705 of 19265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brideshead View Post

Hi Suzie - I'm not sure I said checked (I may have done) but I did wear a plain or striped BD open under a suit by summer of 1969.
With regard to the pocket hanky I have always tried to have a coordinated rather than matching look. Back in the day colours were much more limited of course.
The tie pin or stud through the top pocket started as a necessity as Roy says. At Ilford Palais the girls were rather more sinister, stealing hankies for their 'pimp'.

You're right John, you did just say a BD:

'On ties, I recall that Saturday Night was more formal and a tie would nearly always be worn (at least in autumn, winter and spring) but on other nights an open neck was OK. I do remember going to a summer wedding in 1969 - just the evening do - and having decided to wear just an open necked BD with my suit, was left to feel very underdressed. Never again!'

It was nearly a year ago!
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