or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mod to Suedehead - Page 191

post #2851 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
Once an idea gains currency it becomes the accepted truth. That doesn't mean that it actually is the truth, just that it is the 'accepted truth'. This thing about Crombies not coming along until the 'suedehead era' is one such 'accepted truth'. I can certainly speak for the scene in S E London when I say that Crombie-style overcoats were around at the time of cropped hair.

George Marshall is a Scot writing with hindsight about a scene I don't believe he was part of. Spirit of 69 is more about the revival than the original era. If he recalls the late arrival of Crombies that may well be because they started as a London fashion.

By the way, to those of us who grew our hair in 1970 there was no such thing as the 'suedehead era'.

Thanks! I'm getting the impression that it was a lot more mixed up and all over the shop than a neat linear overly simplistic history, many writers have talked about. That's food for thought and very handy information, for those of us, who always love and respect what the original skinhead scene was all about, even if we came along later (in the 1980s in my case).
post #2852 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
Once an idea gains currency it becomes the accepted truth. That doesn't mean that it actually is the truth, just that it is the 'accepted truth'.

Terry Wheeler mentions in The Soul Stylists that the original Skinheads wore American clothes. Right from the beginning, it was all American clothes, trying to look like Yanks.

Any comments on that? and would those who did try actually succeed for instance?
post #2853 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex View Post
Terry Wheeler mentions in The Soul Stylists that the original Skinheads wore American clothes. Right from the beginning, it was all American clothes, trying to look like Yanks.

Any comments on that? and would those who did try actually succeed for instance?

I think a heck of a lot of kids didn't actually realise that they were American clothes. I said in a recent essay on the subject: ""The clothes had an Ivy League look, but somehow... they looked different, harder, sharper, English!" I think that sums it up.
post #2854 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
I think a heck of a lot of kids didn't actually realise that they were American clothes. I said in a recent essay on the subject: "The clothes had an Ivy League look, but somehow... they looked different, harder, sharper, English!" I think that sums it up.

That's a great line I think and I reckon it's definitely true. There are a few things that were stated on this thread that are very, very important in my book. 1) First and foremost you were influenced by each other. 2) No one really knows where the fashion started i.e. in which part of London and 3) the excellent quote above.
post #2855 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by raging_rapid View Post
The hair seems varied in length, was this merging into suedehead perhaps?

I think someone mentioned earlier that Jim Cox (?) reminded us that there were a lot of people who simply did not have No1 and No2 crops, but maintained a neat 'college boy' cut with a high parting. That's how my own was throughout the period. I had mates who were vain about their hair and wouldn't cut it short. They had all the clothes but hair length varied between college boy and Steve Marriott. Yet we were all part of the same crowd.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raging_rapid View Post
Tell me, do you know if the Ivy League shop in the West End was still around by this time?

If you mean the Squire Shop in Brewer St, then yes.
post #2856 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
I think someone mentioned earlier that Jim Cox (?) reminded us that there were a lot of people who simply did not have No1 and No2 crops, but maintained a neat 'college boy' cut with a high parting.

He (Jim) did that in The Soul Stylists yes, put that up a few pages back
post #2857 of 24916
Just posting this never been seen pic of Brownie in the suit, he said it was taken April 70, and a very smart lad indeed.
post #2858 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post
Just posting this never been seen pic of Brownie in the suit, he said it was taken April 70, and a very smart lad indeed.

Don't think I've ever seen such a clear photo (from back in the day) of an original skinhead in a suit, shame we can't see the shoes... excellent stuff though
post #2859 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
The clothes had an Ivy League look, but somehow... they looked different, harder, sharper, English!"

To support this statement even further I looked up a quote from John Brideshead saying the thing is that implicit in the whole Mod/Skin/Smooth at the upper level was the need to be relatively understated and to buy the very best quality you could afford. When done well, it was in a way a very English approach!
post #2860 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post
Just posting this never been seen pic of Brownie in the suit, he said it was taken April 70, and a very smart lad indeed.


My Scanner was not working so i used my camera..just took a pic of the pic
post #2861 of 24916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Roest View Post
Don't think I've ever seen such a clear photo (from back in the day) of an original skinhead in a suit, shame we can't see the shoes... excellent stuff though

Yes thats what Brownie said regarding the shoes, Great pic though.
post #2862 of 24916
Nice suit!
post #2863 of 24916
Fantastic photo! Like the bottom suit jacket button being undone.... You all know this, but it'll interest others..... Q: Why doesn't one button the bottom button on a suit or waistcoat? Posted by stephen hughes on May 13, 2010 at 12:39pm in Mod Style View Discussions A: (from WikiAnswers.com) The tradition of leaving the bottom button of a coat undone started as a fashion choice. Coats are designed to flare away at the bottom, since the hips are (generally) broader than the waist, where a coat should be fastened. Modern suits are all cut with this in mind, and thus the bottom button should never be used, as it throws off the tailoring of the suit, turning a man's silhouette into a cylinder. Ideally, three-button suits aren't supposed to have the top button fastened, either; leaving it undone balances the look and permits the lapel to roll closer to the waist, where it should be. In fact, the two-button suit takes care of this nicely by removing the offending button altogether. It is possible to button the top button without violating fashion rules. There are a few exceptions. The bottom button on some double-breasted jacket is buttoned. There is also a type of custom jacket called a "paddock coat," where the placement of the buttons is altered and both are buttoned. John F. Kennedy was known to wear such a jacket. The custom of leaving the bottom button on a waistcoat undone comes from the early 20th century. King Edward VII was too rotund to fasten his bottom button and the custom came from his imitators. http://lh4.ggpht.com/_dhVPvgJnJF4/Se...e-marriott.jpg
post #2864 of 24916
Reminds me of the old music hall song:

I can't do my bally bottom button up
Can't do my bally bottom button up
It's so tight
Serves me right
I must have eaten too much grub last night.
I can't do my bally bottom button up
And though you think it's fun
What's the use of buttoning
The other bally buttons
When the bally bottom button's undone?
post #2865 of 24916
That's great pic of Brownie...embodies all the talk of getting a well tailored suit but understated. Such a far cry from the super shiny "metallic" tonik suits that are popular with "traditionals" these days. So, what were the shoes being worn? brogues? smooths? Bunty, yea the not buttoning the bottom button is one of those accepted truths. The bit about not buttoning the top is not quite right, only jackets that have the lapel made to roll to the middle button look good unbuttoned at top, otherwise the lapel stops at the top button even if unbuttoned, and looks awkward. Funny, the one thing I've seen only in Europe (Paris and London specifically) is the abundance of men who ONLY button the bottom button!!! Now to me that looks very bizarre and not sure if that's some kind of trend or just ignorance.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead