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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1628

post #24406 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by catchourbreath View Post
 

are they similar in cut to a 501 ?

 

I would say a big baggier and higher waisted, tho mine are a size up i usually wear waist 32's but these are waist 34's.

post #24407 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stingy Brim View Post
 

Speaking of music was just wondering if the pop group (headed up by later reggae star Eddy Grant) the Equals (1965-1970) were ever popular with skinheads?

 

In some ways they seemed much more ‘tailor made’ for that ‘market’ than the contrived Slade whose music at that time was pretty naff.  But the Equals – who all apparently began playing together on a Hornsey Rise council estate - had some great soul influenced stomping tunes with rebellious lyrics like ‘Police on My Back’ – their stage clobber was pretty diabolical though…

 

I'm with Bob on this one - I would class the Equals as being 'acceptable' but not necessarily  'highly sought after'. Probably some skinheads bought their records, but not seen as specifically 'skinhead' music.

 

Having said that, I saw the Equals live in 1973 or 1974 and they were one of the best live acts I've ever seen. 'Black Skin Blue Eyed Boys' - the place was absolutely bouncing!


Edited by roytonboy - 10/13/16 at 7:19am
post #24408 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post
 

 

Thanks for posting this flyfronted, I really enjoyed listening to it.

 

Don's choice is an interesting one - predominantly tracks that got into the charts or were written specifically for the skinhead market. Many aficionados of 'Skinhead Reggae' would turn their nose up at these today but in truth these are the tracks that people bought and listened to back in 1970/71. I note that Don Letts was born in January 1956, which made him 14 in 1970 and this is reflected in his selection - some of these tracks came out when 'skinhead' was on the wane, but would be the sound-track to his youth. 

 

It would be interesting to compare this selection of skinhead music with that compiled by someone who was, say, 17 in 1969. (someone from a similar locality, not one of us Soul fans from up north)

post #24409 of 24880

http://www.allmusic.com/album/tighten-up-vol-2-mw0000221147

As a 12 year old THIS LP was what had been passed down as your education and reflects what i heard from older kids at parties , youth clubs , fun fairs etc ..  

post #24410 of 24880


That was the first (and only) reggae LP I owned at that time Flyfronted,and almost wore the thing out.

That was also pretty much the limit as to what reggae was played in our Youth Club at the time,The BIG exception was Max Romeos Wet Dream.Probably due to the notoriety of the lyrics and the fact that Radio 1 banned it,it got plenty of time on the old Garrard SP 25's.

There was even a dance that had specific moves to it for that tune.Everyone would stand in line,lean to one side and cross their left arm across their right forearm as they chanted "Let me push it up,push it up,lie down !" Not sure if that was a local Midlands thing or not ?

Thanks for the link. Looking forward to seeing it tomorrow.

post #24411 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post
 

This was about 4 years after we were wearing similar clothes. At this time I was wearing flared loon pants, clogs and had shoulder length hair I am embarrassed to say. My mob and many of the originals completely lost it. Interesting that blazers with initial badges are mentioned as I thought that look was ignored by the media caricature of skinheads but was popular with my mates in 69.

Did you ever wear "football jumpers", though - and what exactly do they mean by that? The kind of thing pictured below?

 

I must also admit ignorance of George Webb shoes.

 

s-l1600.jpg 


Edited by Bela Kun - 10/14/16 at 1:49pm
post #24412 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post
 

Did you ever wear "football jumpers", though - and what exactly do they mean by that? The kind of thing pictured below?

 

I also must admit ignorance on George Webb shoes.

 

s-l1600.jpg

Football jumpers were a early 70's Boot boy fashion , market jobs in various teams colours ( no writing - in fact until kids started wearing Lonsdale T's to Soul nights in 75 i cant remeber anything worn that had slogans on ) went with paint sprayed DM's , Ruperts , Toppers etc 

post #24413 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post
 

 

I'm with Bob on this one - I would class the Equals as being 'acceptable' but not necessarily  'highly sought after'. Probably some skinheads bought their records, but not seen as specifically 'skinhead' music.

 

Having said that, I saw the Equals live in 1973 or 1974 and they were one of the best live acts I've ever seen. 'Black Skin Blue Eyed Boys' - the place was absolutely bouncing!

 

Seems like that song also got them known in the US if this comment I found on YT is anything to go by:

 

"This Is A Great Song. This Is The Music We Danced To At House Parties, Dance Parties Etc In New York In The Early To Mid 70's. Listen To:" Makes You Blind" By Glitter Band, "Scorpio" By Dennis Coffey, "Soul Makossa "By Manu Dibango and Melting Pot. Love These Songs!"

post #24414 of 24880

I have just watched a recording of last night's 'Skinhead' documentary by Don Letts.

 

The first thing to say is to M-o-M. Well done Paul, great to see someone talking good sense and without having to resort to 'effing and jeffing' in every sentence. 

 

Predictably, is was a bit 'London-centic' and contained some of the old cliches. It didn't really mention how skinhead had evolved from mod, something that happened gradually in slightly different forms all over the country. I felt it also skirted over the fact that skinhead wasn't really 'multi-racial'  but 'bi-racial' i.e. black(predominantly West Indian) and white. Some of the young lads touched on this - they didn't like 'Pakis', one said to approving nods from the others, "Jamaicans don't like Pakis either" he added. This was not restricted to young lads with short hair and boots, this was prevalent in society as a whole at the time. (in fact, many older people were racist against anyone who wasn't white - my parents certainly were)To explain why this was would give the impression of justifying it, which I'm certainly not going to do. So what we had was selective racism among skinheads and it was this that the far right was to exploit - dislike of Pakistanis was used as a lever to promote racist ideas in general. There is no great mystery in this - the "How did this great muliti- cultural youth movement get hijacked into this fascist monster" question which was the premise of Don's film is far too simplistic in that it makes the assumption that there was no racism amongst skinheads in the late 1960s.

 

It was good, however, to see some new footage from the original era and also to have something produced that was not full of pseudo- sociologist mumbo jumbo or the usual 'youth-culture' commentators who hadn't actually been there at the time. 

post #24415 of 24880
^ thanks for the review. I have low expectations of these things, just an editor ramming home their preconceived agenda - the Hebdige Effect. I'll catch it sometime for MoM but that's about it.
Edited by covskin - 10/15/16 at 6:03am
post #24416 of 24880
It was an interesting documentary as it presented another side of skinhead to the usual preconceptions. It did seem to dump the whole racist burden on Oi! and a few wrong 'uns before that. Britain was and is racist but also accepting and inclusive, and skinhead reflected that just like heavy metal, punk, the police, universities and building sites. Difficult to differentiate this subculture from the culture as a whole. I thought Don let Letts could have pushed things further to make a more insightful film.
post #24417 of 24880
Yep, skinhead is truly a scapegoat, sent out into the desert bearing everyones sins. Even felt like that at the time - none of this 'good' skinheads and 'bad' skinheads nonsense.
post #24418 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

I have just watched a recording of last night's 'Skinhead' documentary by Don Letts.

The first thing to say is to M-o-M. Well done Paul, great to see someone talking good sense and without having to resort to 'effing and jeffing' in every sentence. 

Predictably, is was a bit 'London-centic' and contained some of the old cliches. It didn't really mention how skinhead had evolved from mod, something that happened gradually in slightly different forms all over the country. I felt it also skirted over the fact that skinhead wasn't really 'multi-racial'  but 'bi-racial' i.e. black(predominantly West Indian) and white. Some of the young lads touched on this - they didn't like 'Pakis', one said to approving nods from the others, "Jamaicans don't like Pakis either" he added. This was not restricted to young lads with short hair and boots, this was prevalent in society as a whole at the time. (in fact, many older people were racist against anyone who wasn't white - my parents certainly were)To explain why this was would give the impression of justifying it, which I'm certainly not going to do. So what we had was selective racism among skinheads and it was this that the far right was to exploit - dislike of Pakistanis was used as a lever to promote racist ideas in general. There is no great mystery in this - the "How did this great muliti- cultural youth movement get hijacked into this fascist monster" question which was the premise of Don's film is far too simplistic in that it makes the assumption that there was no racism amongst skinheads in the late 1960s.

It was good, however, to see some new footage from the original era and also to have something produced that was not full of pseudo- sociologist mumbo jumbo or the usual 'youth-culture' commentators who hadn't actually been there at the time. 

You're speaking my mind there, Bryan, and thank you for the vote of confidence. My snippets were the result of a two-and-a-half hour chat with Don, and I was also there while he was interviewing the (solo) black lad with the puffer gilet, and their chat was a long one too. These convos were always going to get edited down a long way. As it happens, I did talk a lot to Don about the overlap of the late mods but that didn't make it into the final product.

You're right about 'bi-racial'. Two things I would say there. Firstly I had nothing against South Asians - no earthly reason to - and I was lucky enough to have a grasp of the 'bigger picture' and understand what drove migration; but I could see from my time in London that there was no meaningful interface between white and Asian youngsters the way there was between white and Caribbean, so no common ground. Secondly, things were not always perfect between black and white; I had a friend called Janet (we liked each other, might have dated if either of us had been 'spare' at the same time) who dated black boys, and as a result white boys wouldn't touch her, myself being if not the only exception then at least the most obvious.

So I think the overall treatment was a little too 'rose-tinted'. Not by much, but enough to be noticeable.

Funnily enough, Ian Stuart of Skrewdriver went to the same school as I did. Seven years later, of course. To late for me to set him straight! LOL.

Nice to see John Simons. In 1969 I bought two pairs of shoes, some socks, and an American shirt from Brewer Street. This year I got a mohair suit from his current shop.

Tonight I'm going to a reggae night in Dundee, just wondering if anyone there saw the doc and wants to bend my ear.
post #24419 of 24880
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeCowley View Post

It was an interesting documentary as it presented another side of skinhead to the usual preconceptions. It did seem to dump the whole racist burden on Oi! and a few wrong 'uns before that. Britain was and is racist but also accepting and inclusive, and skinhead reflected that just like heavy metal, punk, the police, universities and building sites. Difficult to differentiate this subculture from the culture as a whole. I thought Don let Letts could have pushed things further to make a more insightful film.

A mate of mine was just discussing it with me on the phone. We both thought it could have done with being an hour and a half.
post #24420 of 24880

From a foreigner point of view the most interesting is at the beginning - even if sometimes i had the feeling the editing mixed late 60s images with Late 70s one - and the two best contributions are from M-o-M and the 'black lad with the puffer gilet', that seemed to be an 'original' black skinhead. I was a bit surprised 'suedehead' was never mentioned (although i might didn't hear). Nothing really new with the rest of it i must say, featuring the usual suspects. (except i've never seen before Jimmy Pursey so smart).

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xmNXCRnLQo

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