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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1615

post #24211 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post


DJ, i agree it is too expensive, but i found the leather ( at least on the one that i tried ) very supple, nice looking, and of good quality. They are said to be in 'Buffalo leather'. Could be interesting in the next sales.
Now for sure, you pay for the brand. Same with their jeans TBH, for example Uniqlo selvedge jeans are better than basic Levi for half price.

 

Think mine is certainly a different kind of leather, plus it has pop buttons whatever they are called instead of denim style buttons.

 

I would of bought some of those uniqlos but they are not high waisters from what ive read on here. levis standard truckers are trash imo, very thin denim, i paid 40 quid for one a couple of years ago when it was about 50 percent off and still felt ripped off, got one from the seventies now second hand and it is far better quality.

 

i certainly think wrangler and lee are better quality with some of their items then levis these days, then there is the lesser known brands which i wont get into.

post #24212 of 25193

Herbrand st london .. dont know the year 

post #24213 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post



Herbrand st london .. dont know the year 


Looks as though the"Skinhead Reggae" logo has been been Photoshopped onto the existing advert.
post #24214 of 25193

 

1967 Ivy Cut from LV from American Classics - raw denim pretty much what would have been in the UK stores imported from California in the late 60s 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
 


I am a bit puzzled by the fact that there is no arcuate on the back pocket of these '1969 606 jeans'.

 

But i remember this picture i posted a long time ago...

 ...And they do look very similar...

 

Any opinion from the original bunch (or the denim heads & LVC aficionados) ?

post #24215 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Carlson View Post
 

 

Which mod town was it? There's a town south of London. I remember learning there was a town south that had a huge mod history but I'm blanking on the name. Anyway, that's cool stuff. So, different types of music was listened to? I'd assume that it was influenced by your local?

I am sure many of the growing commuter towns around London would have had a strong Mod contingent in the 1960s.  Chelmsford is less than 30 minutes on the train from central London and seemed to be something of a Mod and later Skinhead stronghold.  I think tastes in music were partly locally influenced but there would have been a general consistency across all areas.

 

At Ilford Palais on a Saturday night in 1969, for example, you would hear a bit of reggae mixed with Tamla, soul / R&B and pop.  Some songs that especially stand out from my visits there are: I'll pick a Rose for my Rose, To Love Somebody (Nina Simone version), You Don't Know Like I Know, Wichita Lineman...quite a mixed bag!


Edited by Mr Knightley - 9/12/16 at 4:26am
post #24216 of 25193
Hey there! I have a question it's not really about style, more about trad skin mentality. I've always loved skinhead/mod clothing, the smartness, ska, reggae, soul, the scooter culture, but i don't feel like i could fit in the mentality of working class, hool culture and most importantly violence. I grew up in a middle class family, having everything we needed. I am a really peaceful person, never been into a proper fight. I have plans for the future, i would like to go to uni to study psichology or music. What do you think, people like me can be skinheads?
post #24217 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobekoma View Post

Hey there! I have a question it's not really about style, more about trad skin mentality. I've always loved skinhead/mod clothing, the smartness, ska, reggae, soul, the scooter culture, but i don't feel like i could fit in the mentality of working class, hool culture and most importantly violence. I grew up in a middle class family, having everything we needed. I am a really peaceful person, never been into a proper fight. I have plans for the future, i would like to go to uni to study psichology or music. What do you think, people like me can be skinheads?

 

Yes? its not like all skinheads back then were working class anyway, and not all of them were violent/hooligans, it was just a style mainly popular with working class people(atleast from what ive read here)

post #24218 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donkey Jacket View Post
 

 

Yes? its not like all skinheads back then were working class anyway, and not all of them were violent/hooligans, it was just a style mainly popular with working class people(atleast from what ive read here)

I think 99.9% of Skinheads in 69 were working class .. Middle class kids tended to be hippies . 99.9% of English teenagers with boots and crops also liked the 'Hard ' image it portrayed .

post #24219 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobekoma View Post

Hey there! I have a question it's not really about style, more about trad skin mentality. I've always loved skinhead/mod clothing, the smartness, ska, reggae, soul, the scooter culture, but i don't feel like i could fit in the mentality of working class, hool culture and most importantly violence. I grew up in a middle class family, having everything we needed. I am a really peaceful person, never been into a proper fight. I have plans for the future, i would like to go to uni to study psichology or music. What do you think, people like me can be skinheads?

If you dress like a Skinhead im pretty sure you wont need to go looking for trouble it will find you easily enough 

post #24220 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post
 

If you dress like a Skinhead im pretty sure you wont need to go looking for trouble it will find you easily enough 


what do you mean by that?

post #24221 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post
 

I think 99.9% of Skinheads in 69 were working class .. Middle class kids tended to be hippies . 99.9% of English teenagers with boots and crops also liked the 'Hard ' image it portrayed .

 

Yeah it was uncommon, but it still happened, just not often.

 

And the trouble finding you part is true, i seem to find trouble without even doing anything, mainly from ''chavs'' because it is a different look, and yes it being an ''hard'' image does not help.

post #24222 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobekoma View Post

Hey there! I have a question it's not really about style, more about trad skin mentality. I've always loved skinhead/mod clothing, the smartness, ska, reggae, soul, the scooter culture, but i don't feel like i could fit in the mentality of working class, hool culture and most importantly violence. I grew up in a middle class family, having everything we needed. I am a really peaceful person, never been into a proper fight. I have plans for the future, i would like to go to uni to study psichology or music. What do you think, people like me can be skinheads?

 

Welcome!

 

Are you in the States? The only reason why I ask this is because we have a pigeon hole vision of the subculture. We think that it's all about bovver and dressing in the style of 1969, looking hard, Oi! (Originals, please excuse this term here), and reggae.

 

This is actually very far of the target and especially "trad skin mentality." I was an original California Trojan (trad) skin in California in the 80s part of the Santa Cruz Centurians, Dover Arms Firm, and Boots N Booze Crew (in fact these names were for the same group). Our mentality was working for the weekend, the style, and music. Occasionally we had fights especially with the "Oi!" skins and or boneheads as they had no idea what we were or thought we were mods. We were constantly called "fashion skins."

 

We didn't care about politics but if you were extreme on either side and or racist there would be issues. We didn't go out and hunt down nazis but we would deal with them if needed. It wasn't our main focus. We all loved the music and style and gravitated to it.

I've been doing a lot of research as of late as I still love the original era but my interest has been focused on 67-69. It's completely different than what us Yanks think. The dress is smarter and dapper, the music is better (soul and reggae, though, I do like early 70s junk glam too). Once you get into 69 you have a change in the attitude and as far as I can find in regards to the media there is nothing in the papers about skinhead, peanut, or trotter violence before late 69.

Talking to a handful of originals here and on FB the general notion of this period was to have fun, style, and music. That's it. An Ivy League style from John Simons' two shops the Squire Shop and the Ivy Shop with a neat combed over cut.

In regards to your future, there's nothing wrong with that. I have a BS in computers and Phil Templar from the band is a doctor. The whole grrr working class image is left over from the early Oi! stuff in the 80s - in my opinion - and that era has no bearing on the original era. Certainly a lot in the north worked in factories, the pits, etc. but I'm sure there are a lot of originals here that have professional careers.

Don't mix up our class system with that in England. It's completely different and and over there it's completely different than how it was in the 60s. In the States it's easy to find someone with a college degree and still work in a factory.


Here's a clipping of us from Skinhead Times.

 

post #24223 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Carlson View Post

Welcome!

Are you in the States? The only reason why I ask this is because we have a pigeon hole vision of the subculture. We think that it's all about bovver and dressing in the style of 1969, looking hard, Oi! (Originals, please excuse this term here), and reggae.

This is actually very far of the target and especially "trad skin mentality." I was an original California Trojan (trad) skin in California in the 80s part of the Santa Cruz Centurians, Dover Arms Firm, and Boots N Booze Crew (in fact these names were for the same group). Our mentality was working for the weekend, the style, and music. Occasionally we had fights especially with the "Oi!" skins and or boneheads as they had no idea what we were or thought we were mods. We were constantly called "fashion skins."

We didn't care about politics but if you were extreme on either side and or racist there would be issues. We didn't go out and hunt down nazis but we would deal with them if needed. It wasn't our main focus. We all loved the music and style and gravitated to it.


I've been doing a lot of research as of late as I still love the original era but my interest has been focused on 67-69. It's completely different than what us Yanks think. The dress is smarter and dapper, the music is better (soul and reggae, though, I do like early 70s junk glam too). Once you get into 69 you have a change in the attitude and as far as I can find in regards to the media there is nothing in the papers about skinhead, peanut, or trotter violence before late 69.


Talking to a handful of originals here and on FB the general notion of this period was to have fun, style, and music. That's it. An Ivy League style from John Simons' two shops the Squire Shop and the Ivy Shop with a neat combed over cut.


In regards to your future, there's nothing wrong with that. I have a BS in computers and Phil Templar from the band is a doctor. The whole grrr working class image is left over from the early Oi! stuff in the 80s - in my opinion - and that era has no bearing on the original era. Certainly a lot in the north worked in factories, the pits, etc. but I'm sure there are a lot of originals here that have professional careers.


Don't mix up our class system with that in England. It's completely different and and over there it's completely different than how it was in the 60s. In the States it's easy to find someone with a college degree and still work in a factory.


Here's a clipping of us from Skinhead Times.


Actually I'm from Budapest, Hungary. Here the scene is quite violent and "simple". Plus sometimes it is hard to tell about someone if he/she is a bonehead or just a punk-like oi skin
post #24224 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobekoma View Post


Actually I'm from Budapest, Hungary. Here the scene is quite violent and "simple". Plus sometimes it is hard to tell about someone if he/she is a bonehead or just a punk-like oi skin

 

Then if you have like minded friends who like the style and music, perhaps, influence a pre-69 look. Here's a great example of the style in 68. Imagine mid 60s American Ivy league and you have a smart, dapper, and proper look.

 

This is from a California school year book in 66. Notice desert boots, etc.

 

post #24225 of 25193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobekoma View Post


what do you mean by that?
Most people who (think they) know what a skinhead is will either view you with suspicion or outright hostility. There are many factions of skinheads and many do not get along. To be very honest with you, it can be a violent subculture and if you find yourself surrounded by skinheads who do not know you (at a show or dance night for instance) you could be pulled up. If you don't answer the right questions you can certainly earn yourself a hiding. If you don't like to fight or won't stand up for yourself it might not be the scene for you.
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