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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1614

post #24196 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post

I also wonder to what extent the originals were aware of his big ska tunes (One Step Beyond, Al Capone, etc), seeing as those predated the skinhead era by some 4-5 years?

A compilation named 'Fabulous Greatest Hits' came out in 1968. Was that a popular album with the class of 1969, or was it 'older brother music' by then?

My mob were totally aware of Prince Buster and his music. We looked up to older brothers and cousins and they influenced us. I remember as a young boy being with my mum and dad on Canvey Island one bank holiday when a small gang from East London were roaming around singing Al Capone. Me and my brother were well impressed and that day I decided I wanted to be in a gang.
One of our mates family moved from near Brixton to East London and he brought all his records with him. We knew about reggae, bluebeat, ska, rocksteady and even a bit of calypso. We also listened to pirate Radio Caroline and Radio London and were into English music and Local dancehalls played Atlantic, Stax and a lot of Tamla.
post #24197 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post


Good questions, mate.

I am not sure if I was really aware of the roots of the music we listened to at the time. It wasn't until the revival era and bands like Madness that I began to understand.

I know it has been mentioned many times but it may be worth repeating that our tastes were pretty eclectic, and as well as Jamaican music we liked Motown, Atlantic / Stax, Chicago Blues and the British interpretation (Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall and so on) and also good old pop of the time. Some say that the release of In the Summertime by Mungo Jerry was one of the triggers for the move to suedehead / smooth...

For those interested in the roots, The Ad-Lib Club in Lincoln has quarterly ‘Back to the Roots’ evenings in a cellar bar. You can see the details on their FB page and our old chum browniecj is a regular guest DJ there.

 

That's fascinating. Was that mainly in your area? I've never heard Fleetwood Mac being mentioned or anything outside of reggae and soul. I do know that Spirit in the Sky was popular, though. Didn't skinheads disrupt a Fleetwood Mac gig and caused them not to play? What else did you listen to?


Edited by Sean Carlson - 9/9/16 at 8:09pm
post #24198 of 24872

Just got these fairly cheap off ebay. Not sure how old, probably less than 10 years - but Made in England, limited edition. The colour's a very dark, subtle brown - almost black.

 

It's been said that a lot of brown DMs were around in the late 60s. In fact, one article claims the earliest DM boots were brown.

 

Just wondering if these resemble anything the originals saw or wore back in the day - esp the colour?

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

post #24199 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post
 

Just got these fairly cheap off ebay. Not sure how old, probably less than 10 years - but Made in England, limited edition. The colour's a very dark, subtle brown - almost black.

 

It's been said that a lot of brown DMs were around in the late 60s. In fact, one article claims the earliest DM boots were brown.

 

Just wondering if these resemble anything the originals saw or wore back in the day - esp the colour?

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

I've read many articles stating that the standard color of boots in the late 60s was indeed brown. Docs of the time would have the yellow stitching at the sole as far as I understand. But boots were boots back then as you had Hawkins, Sgt. Peppers, and different hobnail boots. I think in a sense they would be similar, though.

post #24200 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post




Any info on this shot (year, place, source)?

Cheers.

Its from a video i think, skip to 1:02 to see more

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFksmKvyxdY

post #24201 of 24872
I loved Prince Busters stuff , I always felt he had his own distinct sound and in some ways unique too .
I also think he was quite influential in this country even in the early sixties when his sound first came here. I think it was great when the 2-tone lot began to pay tribute to him as it gave him some worthy recognition in the British scene. . And Mr Campbell got to make a bob again. .smile.gifsmile.gif
post #24202 of 24872
post #24203 of 24872

George Best...suedehead influence?

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #24204 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post


I also wonder to what extent the originals were aware of his big ska tunes (One Step Beyond, Al Capone, etc), seeing as those predated the skinhead era by some 4-5 years?

A compilation named 'Fabulous Greatest Hits' came out in 1968. Was that a popular album with the class of 1969, or was it 'older brother music' by then?

Buster tunes like Ten commandments , Big Five and Al capone were massive youth club records when  circa 70 / 72 - It was just Jamaican music to most school kids . Big Five in fact influenced Judge Dread who had all those naughty pop reggae hits . Dont know weh it was released in JA but ' Big Five ' was released in UK in 1970 . 'Al Capone ' in fact still being played in clubs up until about 1975 , was a 'shuffle dance ' record with west indian kids doing that mad dance involving dropping hankis ...

post #24205 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Carlson View Post

That's fascinating. Was that mainly in your area? I've never heard Fleetwood Mac being mentioned or anything outside of reggae and soul. I do know that Spirit in the Sky was popular, though. Didn't skinheads disrupt a Fleetwood Mac gig and caused them not to play? What else did you listen to?

I think you may be right. My early influences came from school chums and then, in about 1965 / 66, things were changing so fast everything was up for grabs.

By 1968 / 69 I suppose tastes had settled down and people had chosen the direction they would go.

Growing up in a 'mod town' close to London I was lucky to have some great live music on the doorstep at Chelmsford Corn Exchange http://chelmsfordrocks.com/cornexchange.html

My own favourite stuff was probably Tamla Motown and Atlantic / Stax. At the Corn Exchange Geno Washington was the favourite.
post #24206 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post

I also wonder to what extent the originals were aware of his big ska tunes (One Step Beyond, Al Capone, etc), seeing as those predated the skinhead era by some 4-5 years?

A compilation named 'Fabulous Greatest Hits' came out in 1968. Was that a popular album with the class of 1969, or was it 'older brother music' by then?

'Oh Carolina' by the Folkes Brothers was often played in the Savoy Rooms, Catfiord, in 68/69.
post #24207 of 24872

Levi's new collection. A new version of the leather trucker jacket. No Franken'sleeves this time. Still buttons instead of poppers. Very nice leather and good length. Two (very discreet) side pockets and one internal pocket. Tried it at the shop today. Fit like a glove. But don't fit my wallet.

post #24208 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post


I think you may be right. My early influences came from school chums and then, in about 1965 / 66, things were changing so fast everything was up for grabs.

By 1968 / 69 I suppose tastes had settled down and people had chosen the direction they would go.

Growing up in a 'mod town' close to London I was lucky to have some great live music on the doorstep at Chelmsford Corn Exchange http://chelmsfordrocks.com/cornexchange.html

My own favourite stuff was probably Tamla Motown and Atlantic / Stax. At the Corn Exchange Geno Washington was the favourite.

 

Which mod town was it? There's a town south of London. I remember learning there was a town south that had a huge mod history but I'm blanking on the name. Anyway, that's cool stuff. So, different types of music was listened to? I'd assume that it was influenced by your local?

post #24209 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
 

Levi's new collection. A new version of the leather trucker jacket. No Franken'sleeves this time. Still buttons instead of poppers. Very nice leather and good length. Two (very discreet) side pockets and one internal pocket. Tried it at the shop today. Fit like a glove. But don't fit my wallet.

 

There not worth the price imo, i tried one on again not long ago and the leather feels cheap/tacky. much prefer my brown no name trucker, much thicker and good quality leather.

post #24210 of 24872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donkey Jacket View Post

There not worth the price imo, i tried one on again not long ago and the leather feels cheap/tacky. much prefer my brown no name trucker, much thicker and good quality leather.

DJ, i agree it is too expensive, but i found the leather ( at least on the one that i tried ) very supple, nice looking, and of good quality. The fact that leather is thicker doesnt always mean better quality.They are said to be in 'Buffalo leather'. Could be interesting in the next sales.
Now for sure, you pay for the brand. Same with their jeans TBH, for example Uniqlo selvedge jeans are better than basic Levi for half price...
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