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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1537

post #23041 of 24875

Sorry to interrupt the soul boy discussion for a second. Couldn't resist this sheepskin jacket (rather than coat - i.e. hip length) for 20 quid off ebay. Looks good, fits well, etc. How common were these 'back in the day'? I seem to remember Man-of-Mystery wore one in his famous stairs photo in 1969.

 

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post #23042 of 24875

Surfer/monkey jacket looking thing by Norse Projects.  No piping.... but WHOOSH!! Prohibitively expensive.  The closest thing I've seen in some time.  Looks kind of squarish in the pic but I think that's due to the hanger and the usual "make it look slim for the pic" move.  

 

post #23043 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by Botolph View Post

Surfer/monkey jacket looking thing by Norse Projects.  No piping.... but WHOOSH!! Prohibitively expensive.  The closest thing I've seen in some time.  Looks kind of squarish in the pic but I think that's due to the hanger and the usual "make it look slim for the pic" move.  



That is the closest I have seen so far to the classic non-piped surfer jacket of 1967.
post #23044 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinny legs View Post

I


Oddly enough some of the Hammond organ stuff by the likes of Big John Patton and Jimmy Smith we grooved along to, would have been appreciated by Mods twenty years previous.



I still groove to Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff, Jack McDuff, and can remember doing so back in the 60s, thanks to some older kids.
post #23045 of 24875
Quote:

Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

 

The 'first Punks ' who made up the audience for Pistols at the 100 club were ex soul boys who had moved on when they thought that had gone commercial . The same mob moved out of Punk by 78 and created the club scene that New Romantic grew out of ...  every scene has its top boys and dressers who lead in 1969 i was 11 and could only dribble at the kids in their mid teens who wore astronauts and sta prest by the time i was 13 and had a paper round and finally got my DM's they had moved on and were into something else .





Well I wasnt a soulboy nor my mates who were around the first punks! Agree there were some and links between the global village, the spooky lady, the clothes such as carpenters trousers, plastic sandals but then there were also overlaps with the bowie crowd and the emerging gay scene... and others like myself who happened upon it early. I think the term soul boy is a bit of a problem , a bit like revival skinheads and casual. There were soul boys, as you say into the music and clothes  and then the normals in the pub calling themselves soulboys..... a bit like later on there were casuals - more like the football casual - and the ordinary pub go-er thought of themselves as casuals, despite a difference in clothes. And again as with the revival, the different waves of that. I suppose its like theres a core version of the scene and its watered down or appropriated by the wider masses and changes with that?



 



Agree with the moving on bit, moved from punk to skinhead then to mod and then casual, mainly for the reasons of being different and changing taste in clothes and music. For the post punk ones though there was always a running theme of the clothes and music having an ivy-ish aspect and the music around soul.To some theres more that a hint of elitism around this,and I'd agree there was a bit of this for me, without trying to sound arrogant



On the jazz/soul sounds, when I was getting more and more into soul and blues in 79, Alan Lewis , the editor of Sounds, and an ex-mod, recommended listening to Brother Jack.

 



Covskin , luck does to a certain extent have a great deal to do with it. Bumping into the right people, seeing the right band or going to right club and hearing the right music.


Edited by TomMc666 - 2/26/16 at 8:50am
post #23046 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post
 
Quote:
 
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

 

The 'first Punks ' who made up the audience for Pistols at the 100 club were ex soul boys who had moved on when they thought that had gone commercial . The same mob moved out of Punk by 78 and created the club scene that New Romantic grew out of ...  every scene has its top boys and dressers who lead in 1969 i was 11 and could only dribble at the kids in their mid teens who wore astronauts and sta prest by the time i was 13 and had a paper round and finally got my DM's they had moved on and were into something else .

 

Well I wasnt a soulboy nor my mates who were around the first punks! Agree there were some and links between the global village, the spooky lady, the clothes such as carpenters trousers, plastic sandals but then there were also overlaps with the bowie crowd and the emerging gay scene... and others like myself who happened upon it early. I think the term soul boy is a bit of a problem , a bit like revival skinheads and casual. There were soul boys, as you say into the music and clothes  and then the normals in the pub calling themselves soulboys..... a bit like later on there were casuals - more like the football casual - and the ordinary pub go-er thought of themselves as casuals, despite a difference in clothes. And again as with the revival, the different waves of that. I suppose its like theres a core version of the scene and its watered down or appropriated by the wider masses and changes with that?

 

 

 

Agree with the moving on bit, moved from punk to skinhead then to mod and then casual, mainly for the reasons of being different and changing taste in clothes and music. For the post punk ones though there was always a running theme of the clothes and music having an ivy-ish aspect and the music around soul.To some theres more that a hint of elitism around this,and I'd agree there was a bit of this for me, without trying to sound arrogant



On the jazz/soul sounds, when I was getting more and more into soul and blues in 79, Alan Lewis , the editor of Sounds, and an ex-mod, recommended listening to Brother Jack.

 

 

Covskin , luck does to a certain extent have a great deal to do with it. Bumping into the right people, seeing the right band or going to right club and hearin

All Scenes are built on One Up man ship and elitism its what drives things forward . Mod skin  soul boy casual Acid House are all the same thing - the same lads from the same areas with many of the older ones taking in the lessons of those who came before or after . Lacy lady for Chris Hill's sunday night was def a place as was Chagaramas and crackers up west . Just herberts who love black music , gear and those little touches in fashion that only they know about .

post #23047 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post
 
Quote:

Well I wasnt a soulboy nor my mates who were around the first punks! Agree there were some and links between the global village, the spooky lady, the clothes such as carpenters trousers, plastic sandals but then there were also overlaps with the bowie crowd and the emerging gay scene... and others like myself who happened upon it early. I think the term soul boy is a bit of a problem , a bit like revival skinheads and casual. There were soul boys, as you say into the music and clothes  and then the normals in the pub calling themselves soulboys..... a bit like later on there were casuals - more like the football casual - and the ordinary pub go-er thought of themselves as casuals, despite a difference in clothes. And again as with the revival, the different waves of that. I suppose its like theres a core version of the scene and its watered down or appropriated by the wider masses and changes with that?

I think that the retailers and availability of styles needs to be considered.Before Kensigton Market closed there were a number of ex RCA/St Martins design students and independents in there who provided and pushed individual looks ,that were soon knocked off and then became widely available.Shoe shops like Robot,Red or Dead etc were small suppliers of some great alternatives lasts and uppers of DM's for example.It was certainly a bit of a free for all.When the likes of Browns/ Woodhouse/Reiss came along selling Italian and French imports this opened another avenue for stylish(and more exclusive at the time) options as I recall,and a return to looking at conventional retail for your choices,just as had been done pre-skinhead with Take 6,Cecil Gee etc.This was then diluted and pushed out by retailers in the suburbs like American Pie IIRC?

My memory is a bit fragmented as I was traveling a lot between '76 and '79 but I recall buying Lacoste in New York,Kappa in Naples and Reminiscence ( carpenter Pants ) in New York also.which was a return to a  pretty Mod/Casual mainstream look compared to what I had worn between '73-'76.

post #23048 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post
 

All Scenes are built on One Up man ship and elitism its what drives things forward . Mod skin  soul boy casual Acid House are all the same thing - the same lads from the same areas with many of the older ones taking in the lessons of those who came before or after . Lacy lady for Chris Hill's sunday night was def a place as was Chagaramas and crackers up west . Just herberts who love black music , gear and those little touches in fashion that only they know about .

The comment on moving from punk onto skinhead etc was about me as was the elitist bit......!! In all of the changes, after punk, getting the right gear, proecting your sources by not letting anyone one know where you got it - and that was about clothes and music - and wanting something unique.

post #23049 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post
 

I think that the retailers and availability of styles needs to be considered.Before Kensigton Market closed there were a number of ex RCA/St Martins design students and independents in there who provided and pushed individual looks ,that were soon knocked off and then became widely available.Shoe shops like Robot,Red or Dead etc were small suppliers of some great alternatives lasts and uppers of DM's for example.It was certainly a bit of a free for all.When the likes of Browns/ Woodhouse/Reiss came along selling Italian and French imports this opened another avenue for stylish(and more exclusive at the time) options as I recall,and a return to looking at conventional retail for your choices,just as had been done pre-skinhead with Take 6,Cecil Gee etc.This was then diluted and pushed out by retailers in the suburbs like American Pie IIRC?

My memory is a bit fragmented as I was traveling a lot between '76 and '79 but I recall buying Lacoste in New York,Kappa in Naples and Reminiscence ( carpenter Pants ) in New York also.which was a return to a  pretty Mod/Casual mainstream look compared to what I had worn between '73-'76.

Remember lots of my 'normal' mates buying and hoisting lacoste in 78 from Lillywhites, and their look, in Hackney Road, of straight Fiorucci jeans or chords and a burberry mac in 78, looked very moddish, whilst my then comtemporary view of 'suedehead' mixed skinhead and mod with a more formal look. 

post #23050 of 24875

Another crap 70's photo! Benidorm August 1978. Me and my cousins, the only skin/suedehead in the place, white levis staprest and my only type of casual shirt, other than short sleeved ben shermans. Could of been worse, could have been wearing an istanbul shirt like to my left....the istanbul, nights of hell listening to bleeding disco.                         .

 

Now back to the 60's!


Edited by TomMc666 - 2/26/16 at 2:47pm
post #23051 of 24875

When One Walks down Da Street Your "Look" can say One Of Two things. "I Comply" or "Fuck You" Simple.

post #23052 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post
 

The comment on moving from punk onto skinhead etc was about me as was the elitist bit......!! In all of the changes, after punk, getting the right gear, proecting your sources by not letting anyone one know where you got it - and that was about clothes and music - and wanting something unique.

Things changed quick as well back then - i guess they still do if your 18 today .  

post #23053 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post
 

Remember lots of my 'normal' mates buying and hoisting lacoste in 78 from Lillywhites, and their look, in Hackney Road, of straight Fiorucci jeans or chords and a burberry mac in 78, looked very moddish, whilst my then comtemporary view of 'suedehead' mixed skinhead and mod with a more formal look. 

My pal has a cracking pic of him in a lacoste behind 2 posters in 1976 - One is the Sex Pistols the other Brass Construction - sums that year up perfectly ( although Brass Construction was out on import in 75 ) .  Swap a Skins  Fred Perry polo  from the 60s with a Soul Boys 70s Lacoste and then a Casuals 80's RL and you have 3 decades of working class culture in 3 different looks .

post #23054 of 24875
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

My pal has a cracking pic of him in a lacoste behind 2 posters in 1976 - One is the Sex Pistols the other Brass Construction - sums that year up perfectly ( although Brass Construction was out on import in 75 ) .  Swap a Skins  Fred Perry polo  from the 60s with a Soul Boys 70s Lacoste and then a Casuals 80's RL and you have 3 decades of working class culture in 3 different looks .
During my brothers last year at secondary school-79- their uniform became black.
There were a good dozen of them, the Battersea Boogie Boys, wearing Farahs, Kingsway or College shoes with the metal bar across the instep, plus Slazenger or Pringle jumpers. Pretty nifty look for school wear
post #23055 of 24875
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