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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1536

post #23026 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post
 

 

This thread is beginning to loose direction I think? 

 

Perhaps some more unremarkable pictures from the 7ts could put that right. .

post #23027 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
 

 

I would say that both the polo shirts in that sequence are by the same manufacturer and  look like Penguin style but not able to distinguish the logo from image available . .

Its a Gabichi . 

post #23028 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
 

A very late 70s look to me. Close to skin (left), and to punk (right)

 

from : http://www.thebeatexcavation.com/article.php?s=slough-soul-boys

 

' This period coincided with punk and so fashionwise the two scenes collided with people travelling from Reading and West London in their bondage trousers to hear the cutting edge soul sounds played by Alan Sullivan at Skindles.'

thats 1978 ( bank holiday in Bournmouth )  the kid on the left is me . MA1 and Lonsdale T shirt - mix of Soul boy and Football that got hijacked by ' muggy boneheads ' the following year .

post #23029 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post
 

thats 1978 ( bank holiday in Bournmouth )  the kid on the left is me . MA1 and Lonsdale T shirt - mix of Soul boy and Football that got hijacked by ' muggy boneheads ' the following year .

A picture i like very much, and that i wanted to post for a long time. Waiting for the right occasion. Glad to know your face Flyfronted !

I recognized the Lonsdale Tshirt. A classic look with a MA-1 at the time. Without stupid connotations then.

Cheers

C.

post #23030 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by covskin View Post

I think Soulboy is relatively underdocumented because the clothes were actually fairly mainstream

 

A bit like the original skinheads, then, as we recently noted? It seems that soul boy, too, was a gradually changing working class youth culture into black dance music and certain fashion brands. As opposed to revivalist skins, who are a clearly defined 'cult' with rigid boundaries and an ethos of lifetime commitment ('a way of life', etc). Though one may argue that the skinhead revival kickstarted by Madness was more of a temporary youth fashion as well.

 

Anyway, I like Botolph's assessment: they're all different branches of the same tree.


Edited by Bela Kun - 2/24/16 at 10:16am
post #23031 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by covskin View Post

Haha...I was never into Sham, too preachy plus it's the sort of formula punk where you expect to hear that 'handclap' sound effect every few seconds.

 

I like Sham ok and respect what they did, but I like The Ruts better - just as 'street', but the music was much stronger, plus there was a reggae element to it. Not to step on anybody's toes, but maybe they should have been the prototype 'oi' band instead of Sham?


Edited by Bela Kun - 2/24/16 at 3:39am
post #23032 of 24876
Not sure that branches of a tree is a useful analogy, I don't think the relationships are as straightline and genealogical as that. More of a swirl around centres of gravity, centres that either dissipate or become established. Stuff like Nick Knight's Skinhead, Marshall's Spirit of '69 and even Mod to Suedehead can be seen as crude, localised, alternative attempts at a science of this. Getting back to Soulboy, it is one of the weaker manifestations in my view.
Edited by covskin - 2/24/16 at 4:15am
post #23033 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bela Kun View Post
 

 

A bit like the original skinheads, then, as we recently noted? It seems that soul boy, too, was a gradually changing working class youth culture into black dance music and certain fashion brands. As opposed to revivalist skins, who are a clearly defined 'cult' with rigid boundaries and an ethos of lifetime commitment ('a way of life', etc). Though one may argue that the skinhead revival kickstarted by Madness was more of a temporary youth fashion as well.

 

Anyway, I like Botolph's assessment: they're all different branches of the same tree.

Yes 100% - It just depended on what year you was 18 or so - 1968 or 1978 . 

post #23034 of 24876
In the interest of disclosure, I have actually been accused of being a soulboy due to musical tastes from Freeez through D Train and 52nd Street to early House but I vehemently deny it! For a flavour of how I see Soulboy, imagine you are hearing the following in an Essex 'fun pub' in the early mid-80s smile.gif

http://youtu.be/yKTAJkVFvCI
post #23035 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by covskin View Post

In the interest of disclosure, I have actually been accused of being a soulboy due to musical tastes from Freeez through D Train and 52nd Street to early House but I vehemently deny it! For a flavour of how I see Soulboy, imagine you are hearing the following in an Essex 'fun pub' in the early mid-80s smile.gif

http://youtu.be/yKTAJkVFvCI

By the early 80s ' soul boy ' had became a dirty name and like skinheads in 1980 a caricature of what it was in its heyday 1975 - 1978 

like skinhead and Mod the first couple of years are when the faces lead the way and the mainstream are not aware of the scene . The 80s ' essex soul boy ' to the mid 70s one would be your 1970s BOOT BOYS To the original skinheads . The originals move on .

post #23036 of 24876
I think the whole meme about an elite leading the way and moving on, etc invites the question 'so how did that turn out for you?'. How much of this elite-ness and moving on-ness is simply a function of fortuitous growing up rather than a midas touch? Not having a go at anyone, just interested in this meme. For instance I first heard a tape of the Sex Pistols in late 1976, not bad going for a 13 year old, first punks in the school, etc but was I really a member of a small elite quickly moving on or just lucky? Truly, I can take no credit.
Edited by covskin - 2/24/16 at 3:12pm
post #23037 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by covskin View Post

Penguin are a fairly recent thing in the UK I think (well done Louise!) so whenever I see 'darts player' type polo shirts I always think Gabicci. I especially think Gabicci when I see one of those patched cardigan things to the right. Mostly I think t*** of course! I think Soulboy is relatively underdocumented because the clothes were actually fairly mainstream, in an under the radar way perhaps but all in all fairly unremarkable.

I had a Munsingwear yellow V neck jumper in the early 80's with the penguin logo on it. Hard to find, think it came from a golf shop, so you could get it here. Think I bought it after seeing Weller in some Munsingwear . I remember going round Milan clothes shops near the railway station in 1982 trying to get a cheap Gabicci cardi, thinking they came from Italy and would be cheaper there. Got nothing but blank looks from the shop owners. Only found out years later they were a British firm, hence the blank looks. Don't remember soul boys wearing Gabicci, it was the West Indian roots reggae crowd round my way.
post #23038 of 24876
I
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShortBackAndSides View Post

I had a Munsingwear yellow V neck jumper in the early 80's with the penguin logo on it. Hard to find, think it came from a golf shop, so you could get it here. Think I bought it after seeing Weller in some Munsingwear . I remember going round Milan clothes shops near the railway station in 1982 trying to get a cheap Gabicci cardi, thinking they came from Italy and would be cheaper there. Got nothing but blank looks from the shop owners. Only found out years later they were a British firm, hence the blank looks. Don't remember soul boys wearing Gabicci, it was the West Indian roots reggae crowd round my way.
I think the demise of Soulboys occurred 83/84. Musically the focus shifted to syrupy balladeers such as Freddy Jackson and Alexander Oneil, gone were togtooth Farahs, the aforementioned Gabiccis and mock crock shoes- replaced by the likes of Luther Vandross tour T-Shirts, highlighted hair, and Ford Escorts with Wayne and Tracey emblazoned across the windscreen.
By 84 our crowd had moved onto the rare groove scene/ jazz fusion scene.
Oddly enough some of the Hammond organ stuff by the likes of Big John Patton and Jimmy Smith we grooved along to, would have been appreciated by Mods twenty years previous.
I've got a yellow and black vintage Gabicci ill endeavour to upload
Edited by skinny legs - 2/25/16 at 3:00am
post #23039 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by covskin View Post

I think the whole meme about an elite leading the way and moving on, etc invites the question 'so how did that turn out for you?'. How much of this elite-ness and moving on-ness is simply a function of fortuitous growing up rather than a midas touch? Not having a go at anyone, just interested in this meme. For instance I first heard a tape of the Sex Pistols in late 1976, not bad going for a 13 year old, first punks in the school, etc but was I really a member of a small elite quickly moving on or just lucky? Truly, I can take no credit.

The 'first Punks ' who made up the audience for Pistols at the 100 club were ex soul boys who had moved on when they thought that had gone commercial . The same mob moved out of Punk by 78 and created the club scene that New Romantic grew out of ...  every scene has its top boys and dressers who lead in 1969 i was 11 and could only dribble at the kids in their mid teens who wore astronauts and sta prest by the time i was 13 and had a paper round and finally got my DM's they had moved on and were into something else .


Edited by flyfronted - 2/25/16 at 9:13am
post #23040 of 24876
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinny legs View Post

I
I think the demise of Soulboys occurred 83/84. Musically the focus shifted to syrupy balladeers such as Freddy Jackson and Alexander Oneil, gone were togtooth Farahs, the aforementioned Gabiccis and mock crock shoes- replaced by the likes of Luther Vandross tour T-Shirts, highlighted hair, and Ford Escorts with Wayne and Tracey emblazoned across the windscreen.
By 84 our crowd had moved onto the rare groove scene/ jazz fusion scene.
Oddly enough some of the Hammond organ stuff by the likes of Big John Patton and Jimmy Smith we grooved along to, would have been appreciated by Mods twenty years previous.
I've got a yellow and black vintage Gabicci ill endeavour to upload

1979 for my lot  was the end of the ' Soul Scene ' - Some moved into pre casual Gabichi / Slacks and Bally shoes  ( as in that pic ) which was a modern day Rude Boy London x Jamaican look ( shades of Skin and Rudies in the late 60s ) the others who still went out dancing up west got into a 1950's Rockabilly look but still dancing to Funk . Thing is nowdays a well dressed mature man can take bits from the last 4 decades and mix n match - Barraccuta / wejuns / japanese denim / US Navy deck jackets / Red wings etc etc .....    whats classic remains classic and the shit bits we all forget about LOL 

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