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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1166

post #17476 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post

Apologies if this website has been mentioned before:

http://adamoflondon.com/home/

And, if any of you guys have used them - for anything - what do you reckon?

Well now I know where to get a whistle when I graduate!
post #17477 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post

Well now I know where to get a whistle when I graduate!

Got some nice Threads,the only problem is nothing my Size.
post #17478 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

A couple of photo sets that might have been posted before.

Carnaby St in the 60s;

www.vintag.es/2013/11/marvellous-black-and-white-photos-of.html

Mod revivalists in and around Carnaby St 1979 and 1980

www.vintag.es/2012/07/mods-in-london-1979-1980.html

 The bloke outside the door has it bang on. Could be me now... ... (wishing).

post #17479 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oneflewover View Post



 The bloke outside the door has it bang on. Could be me now... ... (wishing).


Can't tell: is that a stingy-brimmed fedora or a pork pie hat the fellow in question is wearing?
Cool pic either way.
post #17480 of 19331

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

I picked up these very straight-forward looking British-made shades off of the 'bay for a fiver. I'd say they were made early 70s, just post decimal. The slip inside has info on lens replacement (25p, or 50p for scratch resistant lenses. That included return postage) I'm guessing they're a mid-60s design, as JWL is wearing a similar pair in the Paperback Writer promo film.

I liked the simplicity of the design, the fact they were British made, and that they were obviously affordable when new.

post #17481 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

I picked up these very straight-forward looking British-made shades off of the 'bay for a fiver. I'd say they were made early 70s, just post decimal. The slip inside has info on lens replacement (25p, or 50p for scratch resistant lenses. That included return postage) I'm guessing they're a mid-60s design, as JWL is wearing a similar pair in the Paperback Writer promo film.

I liked the simplicity of the design, the fact they were British made, and that they were obviously affordable when new.

Sunglasses don't often get mentioned but back in the late 60s many of us had them as an accessory. I had several pairs similar to the above only with a gold frame.They had to be polaroids and some of us that took up fishing found them useful for that purpose. I don't remember wearing them down at the seaside on our bank holiday trips, probably because accessories were kept to a minimum, in case of a ruck.They were also an item that could be easily nicked or forgotten in the pub.

post #17482 of 19331


Returning to the wearing of blazers here is my blazer badge (and receipt) that I wore on a dark blue blazer, centre vent (7 inches?) with three silver buttons, patch pockets, medium lapels. I worked in the shop that supplied badges to East London/Essex borders. The fashion was short lived (3-6 months). The receipt shows the badge was bought by me 14/03/1970 and cost 10 shillings and  eightpence (I got a discount for being staff). I sold many of this style of badge. Others wore more elaborate badges and designs but in our area no football badges were worn as it would have been asking for trouble in an area where West Ham, Tottenham, Leyton Orient, Arsenal and some Chelsea fans 'rubbed shoulders' with each other on a regular basis. The wearing of Blazers with badges has an Ivy precedent but I'm not sure if we were aware of that at the time.

post #17483 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post
 


Returning to the wearing of blazers here is my blazer badge (and receipt) that I wore on a dark blue blazer, centre vent (7 inches?) with three silver buttons, patch pockets, medium lapels. I worked in the shop that supplied badges to East London/Essex borders. The fashion was short lived (3-6 months). The receipt shows the badge was bought by me 14/03/1970 and cost 10 shillings and  eightpence (I got a discount for being staff). I sold many of this style of badge. Others wore more elaborate badges and designs but in our area no football badges were worn as it would have been asking for trouble in an area where West Ham, Tottenham, Leyton Orient, Arsenal and some Chelsea fans 'rubbed shoulders' with each other on a regular basis. The wearing of Blazers with badges has an Ivy precedent but I'm not sure if we were aware of that at the time

A nice badge ,is it your initials ? when you mention more elaborate badges were they peoples initials ? or something else ?.

I do remember football blazer badges being worn here but usually on Crombies or Harringtons,also clubs colours as the pocket handkerchiefs,also blue and white or red and white wool scarves in the winter months.

 

I wonder if you can still get blazer badges made specially like yours ?.

 

The sunglasses that I remember seeing a lot of were the ones without a frame around the lens just gold coloured metal across the top, (I saw some Rodenstock  on ebay that looked like them) I expect the older lads had poloroids and the young kids ( like me ) cheap knock offs from the sea front shops.

post #17484 of 19331

We used to call them 'Initialled Blazers' and generally they were our own initials. The more elaborate badges were decorative with no specific meaning. I found the pattern book for the badges in a drawer at the shop and the manager was only too pleased for me to go ahead and order them.I order about six the first week and within a few weeks we were ordering many more. The orders had to be sent away and came back a week later.Ilford Palais was where we paraded ourselves in our blazers. Never street wear and because we all ended up looking like we were wearing a school uniform (stripped ties, white button down shirts, grey tonik trousers and black royals or loafers) the look was soon dropped. I also used to dig around the stockroom for old stock from the early sixties and found some decent stuff tucked away and forgotten.Mainly early mod John Smedley type gear with an Italian influence.

I remember the sunglasses without a frame and I think I had a pair.

post #17485 of 19331

Speaking of Italian influence...

I was in Venezia for a few days.

There is a lot of very nice clobber in this shop called "Black watch", Calle del forno, like these suede loafers and jacket.

post #17486 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
 

Speaking of Italian influence...

I was in Venezia for a few days.

There is a lot of very nice clobber in this shop called "Black watch", Calle del forno, like these suede loafers and jacket.

The mystery gent with the hat has almost the same cut jacket. He actually looks like he might well be wearing the same shirt, shoes and jacket as shown in the window display.

post #17487 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

The mystery gent with the hat has almost the same cut jacket. He actually looks like he might well be wearing the same shirt, shoes and jacket as shown in the window display.

Now that you have made the picture bigger,could the hat be a Homburg ? ( Botolphs question).

post #17488 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post
 

Now that you have made the picture bigger,could the hat be a Homburg ? ( Botolphs question).

I think Homburgs curve up at the sides more. I don't think it's a porkpie either. The one I bought from Hornet's in Kensington is similar. It was labelled as a stingy-brim fedora. I was looking for something as near as damn it as Johnny Boy's titfer in Mean Streets

post #17489 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post

We used to call them 'Initialled Blazers' and generally they were our own initials. The more elaborate badges were decorative with no specific meaning. I found the pattern book for the badges in a drawer at the shop and the manager was only too pleased for me to go ahead and order them.I order about six the first week and within a few weeks we were ordering many more. The orders had to be sent away and came back a week later.Ilford Palais was where we paraded ourselves in our blazers. Never street wear and because we all ended up looking like we were wearing a school uniform (stripped ties, white button down shirts, grey tonik trousers and black royals or loafers) the look was soon dropped. I also used to dig around the stockroom for old stock from the early sixties and found some decent stuff tucked away and forgotten.Mainly early mod John Smedley type gear with an Italian influence.
I remember the sunglasses without a frame and I think I had a pair.


I will be honest with you Bob the Badger,this is why I(and if I can remember correctly)and none of the older Skins wore Badges on Blazers-it reminded us of School.As I have said before,there was one person who did,but he played Professional Football for Luton Town.He looked very smart as well.

The Sunglasses I had were twin bar Polaroids,the Style Inks has purchased are more earlier 60s(very smart though)and normally were associated with West/East Germans.
post #17490 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post


Firstly, I think he was using that statement to startle his readers and to reinforce his point about Ivy League clothing items having different significances in different places at different times.

Secondly, the vast majority of us didn't even know our clothes were Ivy-League-influenced. They were just items of fashion.

The guys in the famous Piccadilly Circus photo - let's be fair - were in the minimal skinhead gear. But hey! aren't those American-style button-down Oxford shirts? biggrin.gif I'll bet the guy's point would seem to have more relevance if you could see the same blokes dressed up for an evening out.

 

M-O-M = Yes, I got that about the 'shock' value of mentioning skinheads, but you have picked up on the main theme of my comment - not only did I not know that our look was partly influenced, I had never even heard of Ivy League style back then - we wore what was fashionable, as you said. To be more accurate, pedantic even (one of my specialities!) I would have said that 'Ivy League' was more of an influence on 'Mod' and that in fact 'skinhead' initially moved away from this look. I would suggest the Piccadilly Circus photos (and those of the Paint House Gang), were in support of that argument. Surely Ivy League 'style' is more than just putting on a button down collar shirt? If I was asked what 'kick-started' skinhead I would have thought,  "working class mod meets cool young West Indian immigrant" was a more accurate description, though, of course, nothing is quite that simplistic. As we know, there were different influences in different areas at different times. As ever - always happy to 'stimulate discussion' on various topics!:satisfied:

 

Cerneabbas - yes, we certainly wore some American style clothing (though at the time I was unaware the extent of this). This became even more prevalent as we moved to the Suedehead look. The influence of the Ivy League look was more, then less, than more dominant again at various times through the 1960's and early 1970's. It was a reflection of the time - fast moving trends, clothes sending out certain signals to those 'in the know' - in some ways the same message as the author of the  Ivy League article was portraying.

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