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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1143

post #17131 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post

Great stuff but I still find it hard to believe some are not a little earlier. The generic white shirt and tie undone reeks of 1968. But it could be the regional thing I suppose...


I would have put it there Mr.Knightley.

Welcome back Gabriela,you are always welcome.
post #17132 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimH View Post

Just made a belt for an ex-mod and had a great chat with him about all this stuff - brilliant era!!

Get him on here Mate.smile.gif
post #17133 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankmod View Post


The tassled Loafers were the first give-away-I could go for nearly a day,of what was not accurate to the set date.But I wont.....smile.gif
post #17134 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post


Great stuff but I still find it hard to believe some are not a little earlier. The generic white shirt and tie undone reeks of 1968. But it could be the regional thing I suppose...

Mr Knightley,As you have mentioned regional,the Zephyr has a Birmingham area number ( I think ) I wonder if the lady  that you know from Birmingham might be able to help date the picture ? ( a long shot I know,).

I thought that the pictures were good but it made me realise what a long time ago it was,and truthfully how little of the clothes I would wear now,as roytonboy remarked nostalgia isn't what it used to be.


Edited by cerneabbas - 2/27/14 at 1:03am
post #17135 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post
 

 

elwood - I gave you my own personal reply on this one, but I'm not sure how typical it was. In our area, as you are aware, and probably across much of the north of England, that Mod/Skinhead/Suedehead identity was linked to soul music. If you were a youngster the chart Soul and Motown  stuff was what you bought and listened to at home and at the youth club the girls would dance to it. Often there would be all sorts of kids at the local youth club but as you got a bit older and wanted to be with the 'in crowd' you naturally went to a soul club. The 'big timers',  as we used to call them, would be there (the older lads you aspired to be like), your mates wanted to go there to see and be seen and probably that girl you fancied would be there too. It was the place to be.Some people absolutely loved the music, many others liked it, for some it may have been incidental to the whole experience. Of the people who used to attend the local soul club where I went regularly, how many would be soul fans now? Undoubtedly some will be, but the majority? Probably never set foot in a soul venue since 1972. They might enjoy hearing the odd old tune on Radio 2. but that's as far as it goes. As I posted some months ago, when I first started going to a soul club in late 1970 it was very busy "wall to wall skinhead", by late 1972 it had closed down - the older skinheads had moved on, the younger kids were into Slade and Gary Glitter.

 

cerneabbas posed the same question about football. How many of our ilk went to football with their mates because it was the thing to do? I became a skinhead because I was a football fan, I'm sure others went to football because they wanted to be skinheads and that's what skinheads did. I certainly had one mate who fell into that category. Of the 4 close mates I regularly went to watch City with 1969 - 1972, how many still go, even occasionally? How many of them even went in their twenties? Well, 2 of them have sadly departed (now there's a thought.....) I know one of the others still goes now and then and and as for the fourth, (the lad I initially became a skinhead with) I haven't seen or heard from him since the day of my wedding in 1979. I'm sure he would always state his allegiance if asked, but whether he ever goes is anybody's guess. I still occasionally recognise some of the faces from that era if I go to City, but we're only really talking about 3 or 4 individuals and certainly no-one I knew personally. I would imagine every club is pretty much the same.

 

Those of us on this forum  obviously have a pretty strong connection with that era but for most people it was just a phase in their life. - they did it, enjoyed it and moved on to something else. Whilst we also did this there are some threads with our past that obviously remain.

roytonboy.A nail on the head post I think.

As we get further away from the period the "rules" become more entrenched,for instance skinheads love ska ! as we saw when talking about music on this thread last year some skinheads listened to ska ( and for a limited period in some cases).

Your soul club story proves it for me,thriving in 1970 shutdown in 72,as you say the customers had moved on to something else, music tastes like fashion tastes largely disposable even then maybe.

I wont say the r word again but modern day enthusiasts of the look need somewhere to gather and lets face it that couldn't be at football and so it is at soul or ska nights.

As for football,I can remember one poor lad coming to his first game with us and things going completely mad ending in him getting a bottle over his head,we never saw him again and I bet that was the case for a lot of people then,or they stopped going when their mates did.

I think that people just go along with their mates in some ways when they are younger,I know that when we used to go out I ended up thinking "what the hell am I doing in  here ?" many times,I doubt that I am the only one.

post #17136 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

roytonboy.As for football,I can remember one poor lad coming to his first game with us and things going completely mad ending in him getting a bottle over his head,we never saw him again and I bet that was the case for a lot of people then,or they stopped going when their mates did.
I think that people just go along with their mates in some ways when they are younger,I know that when we used to go out I ended up thinking "what the hell am I doing in  here ?" many times,I doubt that I am the only one.


When I moved to Guildford,I did not know a soul.The first Dance I went to(at the Guildford Civic Hall)I got jumped on.I was taken to a nearby Pub,because the Doormen had thrown me out,where I got cleaned up.The Fellas that helped me I got to know very well-in fact they were the boys I started knocking about with.The moral of the story is,they can knock you down but you keep getting up.We learnt to look after ourselves(we were never a big mob).
post #17137 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post


I would have put it there Mr.Knightley.

Welcome back Gabriela,you are always welcome.

Thanks :) I do read the thread but I don't post lol. Will start posting more!

post #17138 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post

Welcome, Cleav.

My old Tootal scarf is another lost treasure for me. I had a 60s (or even late 50s) yellow/ gold paisley one that I persuaded my Grandad to give me in about 1970. I was sure until recently that I still had it somewhere but can I find it ...? maybe it's stuffed away somewhere in the loft. Anyway, I did recently inherit another 60s Tootal scarf with quite an unusual pattern - well at least I'd never seen it before. It's not silk though - 100% rayon. I'll try and put a photo of it on here.

And just to add that those photos are brilliant, Bunty and thanks for the link to the info on your FB page, gabriela.


Here's a couple of photos of the Tootal scarf I mentioned. A sort of Paisley pattern with racecourse scenes ... could imagine a raffish bookie wearing it (not who I inherited it from):



The label says it's "Tebilized" - some sort of crease resistance ... a Sta-Prest scarf?

post #17139 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

elwood - I gave you my own personal reply on this one, but I'm not sure how typical it was. In our area, as you are aware, and probably across much of the north of England, that Mod/Skinhead/Suedehead identity was linked to soul music. If you were a youngster the chart Soul and Motown  stuff was what you bought and listened to at home and at the youth club the girls would dance to it. Often there would be all sorts of kids at the local youth club but as you got a bit older and wanted to be with the 'in crowd' you naturally went to a soul club. The 'big timers',  as we used to call them, would be there (the older lads you aspired to be like), your mates wanted to go there to see and be seen and probably that girl you fancied would be there too. It was the place to be.Some people absolutely loved the music, many others liked it, for some it may have been incidental to the whole experience. Of the people who used to attend the local soul club where I went regularly, how many would be soul fans now? Undoubtedly some will be, but the majority? Probably never set foot in a soul venue since 1972. They might enjoy hearing the odd old tune on Radio 2. but that's as far as it goes. As I posted some months ago, when I first started going to a soul club in late 1970 it was very busy "wall to wall skinhead", by late 1972 it had closed down - the older skinheads had moved on, the younger kids were into Slade and Gary Glitter.

cerneabbas posed the same question about football. How many of our ilk went to football with their mates because it was the thing to do? I became a skinhead because I was a football fan, I'm sure others went to football because they wanted to be skinheads and that's what skinheads did. I certainly had one mate who fell into that category. Of the 4 close mates I regularly went to watch City with 1969 - 1972, how many still go, even occasionally? How many of them even went in their twenties? Well, 2 of them have sadly departed (now there's a thought.....) I know one of the others still goes now and then and and as for the fourth, (the lad I initially became a skinhead with) I haven't seen or heard from him since the day of my wedding in 1979. I'm sure he would always state his allegiance if asked, but whether he ever goes is anybody's guess. I still occasionally recognise some of the faces from that era if I go to City, but we're only really talking about 3 or 4 individuals and certainly no-one I knew personally. I would imagine every club is pretty much the same.

Those of us on this forum  obviously have a pretty strong connection with that era but for most people it was just a phase in their life. - they did it, enjoyed it and moved on to something else. Whilst we also did this there are some threads with our past that obviously remain.

More thoughts I appreciate, roytonboy. (How could I have omitted football??? ... the third element in another trinity - but again which element drew you in would depend on the individual.) And those of us on this forum are probably unrepresentative as most won't have given any of it another thought in the intervening forty years. If you remember those times and you're on here some or all of it (football/ fashion/music) still means something to you.
post #17140 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

cerneabbas - Recent research shows that the average age of people attending Premier League games is now 41. Gone forever at this level are the experiences that we had of going with your local mates, meeting up with others, walking around the ground, standing together. Lads of that age just can't do it now - you have to buy tickets in advance,  you can't buy more than a couple of seats together (it's probably too expensive for most) .

I've seen that stat too, roytonboy, and anyone who used to go on the terraces I the late 60s to late 70s and still goes to Premier League games now will recognise it from what they see. And if you look at videos of the period on YouTube, the sound of the singing from the terraces is of much younger voices than today. All those factors you quote mean it's changed, probably permanently.

One reflection on the terrace "activity" that used to occur - I remember reading somewhere, but can't find it now, an explanation for the rise of "hooliganism" in the late 60s being along the following lines. Until the 1960s, the terraces were filled with older adult males who wouldn't tolerate young lads running wild and would effectively keep them in check. However, with increasing prosperity not least reflected in car and TV ownership, from the early 60s onwards these older males abandoned the terraces for trips out in the car, mowing the lawn and watching Grandstand. As a result, the terraces were left to younger males' rivalry.

That's a very rough outline of a sociological explanation ... take it as you will. But it would suggest that what we saw in that period was very much of its time.
post #17141 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabriela View Post
 

 

Yes, it was shared on The Ballroom Bltz with the other pictures Bunty posted. It was taken at the Tin Hat (Kettering, 1971). The rest are also from 1970-1971, I put up some info

 

Thanks for the link, gabriela, I enjoyed browsing.

post #17142 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Mr Knightley,As you have mentioned regional,the Zephyr has a Birmingham area number ( I think ) I wonder if the lady  that you know from Birmingham might be able to help date the picture ? ( a long shot I know,).

I thought that the pictures were good but it made me realise what a long time ago it was,and truthfully how little of the clothes I would wear now,as roytonboy remarked nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

 



I agree, cerneabbas, about the way it all looks to us today – very dated and not really in a good way.

I know I am a terrible snob and you will recall I have previously complained that, even viewed at the time, a large gathering of skinheads was not often a pretty sight! As today, people interpreted casual as f***ing scruffy – dirty boots, sta-prest turned up in the most amateurish fashion and pilling knitwear…..That sort of thing. My own dress often fell short of the standards I set for myself.

But every now and then, of course you would spot a boy or girl that looked ‘just right’ and that was a thing to behold.

Gill Evans is the former ‘Continentalist’ from Birmingham (and she certainly would have been in the latter category) and I shall ask her the question. She may have a view on it.
Edited by Mr Knightley - 2/28/14 at 3:57am
post #17143 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post



Here's a couple of photos of the Tootal scarf I mentioned. A sort of Paisley pattern with racecourse scenes ... could imagine a raffish bookie wearing it (not who I inherited it from):







The label says it's "Tebilized" - some sort of crease resistance ... a Sta-Prest scarf?



 



What a beauty!
post #17144 of 19279
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/t1/1972542_715639918467923_2112472273_n.jpg

I suppose if you are going to re-create the look today this is about as good as it gets - our own Jay San (Get Smart)
post #17145 of 19279
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post


When I moved to Guildford,I did not know a soul.The first Dance I went to(at the Guildford Civic Hall)I got jumped on.I was taken to a nearby Pub,because the Doormen had thrown me out,where I got cleaned up.The Fellas that helped me I got to know very well-in fact they were the boys I started knocking about with.The moral of the story is,they can knock you down but you keep getting up.We learnt to look after ourselves(we were never a big mob).

browniecj.I wont go into the whole story of that day,but I did feel sorry for the lad,he just tagged along with his mates and was totally unprepared for a day ( and an evening,as it was an away game) of violent incidents.I saw one of his mates years after and he told me the lad still talked about it.

BTW I looked on that Ballroom Blitz site and there was a bloke on there wearing one of those Argyle slipovers in white and black,started me thinking was there cardigans in that design as well?

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