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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1109

post #16621 of 18914

 

Pretty sure this has been on here before. Another Daily Express photo, this time dated (April 1971) and caption:

 

'Lindsay Newton, 14, from North Salford Girls’ secondary school was one of several pupils who upset their parents and head teacher when they got ‘skin-bird’ haircuts.'

post #16622 of 18914

A couple of earlier photos from same source (but this time from the Daily Herald) and dated 30th March 1964 with captions about "Clacton scooter disturbances" (apologies if already on here):

 


 (some nice hats in this one)

 

 

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

 

(interesting one of the girls' leather coats ... sorry couldn't get the size right on this one)

post #16623 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

browniecj - you are correct in your assertion that Soul was the predominant music of choice in and around Manchester,however, this was not exclusively the case. You have referred to the book 'CENtral 1179' and this pricked my curiosity as I would have expected as least some ska/reggae to have featured at The Twisted Wheel, as when I started to go out to clubs some (admittedly a small minority) was played. Looking through the Whitworth Street playlist in the book, entitled, "Just A Few Of The Many", a couple of tracks are included - Phoenix City(Roland Alphonso) and Gun Of Navarone (Skatalites), no doubt both very well known to you at the time. As these are on the list they were probably played quite regularly and it's my bet that some others were also played. In terms of live acts, the book tells us that Jimmy Cliff played there, as did Harry J and the All Stars. I recall at the time a short news item on 'North West Tonight' which was reporting on black and white youths getting on in Moss Side. It captured my attention as some of the lads were familiar to me from the terraces at Manchester City - there they were in a local youth club being interviewed with Reggae playing in the background. The 'Wheel' started off as a Rhythm & Blues venue and evolved into a Soul Club - that's why people went there.  I would imagine that outside of London  there was a correlation between the proximity of a West Indian community and the amount of Reggae played. Only 2 West Indian kids in the whole of our my first secondary school gives an indication of our local community - very little Reggae played by us (I remember 'Al Capone' by Prince Buster was one of a very few regularly played at the local Soul club) except for the well known stuff that made the charts, which tended to feature in local youth clubs. I also remember listening to 'Wet Dream' and 'Big Five' in a mate's house as his older brother had them.  I don't know if you agree, but by 1971 some of the 'Reggae' that was being put out was little more than pop music and by 1972 most of it was dreadful. I vividly recall some unfortunate requesting "Johnny Reggae"* at the Soul Club in Shaw one night and the DJ going bonkers - in fact he turned into my Dad, yelling "They'll be having bloody chimpanzees on that Top Of The Pops next!"

* Yes, I know that "Johnny Reggae" wasn't a reggae record, I'm just using that as an example of how commercialism had got hold of the whole thing - let's face it, "Suzanne Beware Of The Devil" wasn't much better (IMHO!)


Yes roytonboy,I read the Playlist.I thought at the time of reading the book that ,for a "Mod" Club,Jamaican Sounds were very sparsely represented.This was confirmed by the Liverpool exMods I spoke to, who visited the "Wheel"(`65/`67).Compared with the "Sink" it was nearly non-existant(their words not mine).I went to a couple of the later "Wheel" Nights-before it closed down and none were played. yet "Polk Salad Annie" and "Hey,Hey Kiss Him Goodbye"were spun as original "Wheel" Spins.

By the time that "Double Barrel",Monkey Spanner" etc.came out,I regarded Reggae as pure pop.
post #16624 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post




Not sure if we've had this on here before ... caption simply says "Skinhead girls at 'The Room at the Top', Ilford" (a venue which I think has been mentioned on here a few times?). It's a Daily Express photo but there's no date given. To my eyes it looks 80s revival - anyone know any more?

Yes that is a "Revival" Picture
.At the Ilford Palais they used to put on "Mod Alldayers" in the 80s.The "Room At The Top" put on Skinhead Dos about the same time.The two clubs were only yards from each other.Sometimes there would be problems outside-between the two groups.This would always confuse me,as one came from the other originally. smile.gif
post #16625 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post

A couple of earlier photos from same source (but this time from the Daily Herald) and dated 30th March 1964 with captions about "Clacton scooter disturbances" (apologies if already on here):





 (some nice hats in this one)

Trilbies,Pork Pie Hats,I think one maybe wearing a Bowler.The only one that is not represented here is the Deerstalkers.



LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01


(interesting one of the girls' leather coats ... sorry couldn't get the size right on this one)

Always liked seeing Girls in Leather Coats.A couple of my Girlfriends had Leather or Suede Coats.Very smart.
post #16626 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post
 

If the drawing is meant to be from 1970 then surely that time would have been more suedehead than skinhead? Where are the Royals, brogues,bass weejuns? Are they covered by other drawings?I never wore a t-shirt then. The boots are too high. My crew wore 6/7 eyelet boots, when we wore them.etc

 

Bob, it depends on where you were. In the book the caption says "1968-9"   - but that particular look, or something like it was more common in the north in 1970 (That's not to say that no-one wore it in 1969 as the look was starting to emerge then). I never heard the term 'Suedehead' until the spring of 1971, by that time we were starting to wear blazers and Prince of Wales check trousers to go out at night but still Levi's/Wranglers and Doc Martens during the day. I use the term 'in the north' but in September 1970 I attended a local football match in which Aston Villa (Birmingham) were the visitors. They brought hundreds and hundreds of skinhead supporters and they were dressed pretty much as we were. Some of those Villa fans were the first I saw wearing donkey jackets. In the Jim Ferguson drawing there are two additional characters, one of them is wearing a donkey jacket. When I first scanned the picture for use in the article I had originally written years ago, I blocked off the two additional characters as they wore clothes not seen in our area -"British Army Two Piece", NCB Boots, Union Shirt, some boots that look straight off a building site - maybe these were common elsewhere, but certainly not by us at any time.

 

Is the book some of you are referring to "Spirit Of 69 - A Skinhead Bible"? I have it in front of me right now. It contains an "A-Z of Skinwear" which pretty much tells you all you need to know -  a mish-mash of original, revival and world wide clothing - "Above: Ilena from Sweden and Lene from Denmark" (in fishnet tights and white ankle socks) - containing not much detail and very few illustrations. Most of the photos are of poor quality and very few relate to the period 1968-1971, in fact, once you have opened the front cover you have past the best bit of the book. Those of our number who view 'skinhead' as an extension of 'mod' with the wearing of smart suits and expensive shoes need to steer well clear of this little tome 'cos it's only going to upset you. Personally, I don't like the 'jokey' narrative style and in any case some of it is inaccurate. For reggae fans there is, to be fair, quite a lot of detail on the different reggae labels , 12 pages in fact. To put things into perspective, however, there are 18 pages on Two-Tone and 22 pages on Oi! and associated activities.

post #16627 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post
 

 

Pretty sure this has been on here before. Another Daily Express photo, this time dated (April 1971) and caption:

 

'Lindsay Newton, 14, from North Salford Girls’ secondary school was one of several pupils who upset their parents and head teacher when they got ‘skin-bird’ haircuts.

I had my hair hair cut like that, bit longer on top, was called a bogbrush round here, mid to late 70's

post #16628 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post
 

A couple of earlier photos from same source (but this time from the Daily Herald) and dated 30th March 1964 with captions about "Clacton scooter disturbances" (apologies if already on here):

 


 (some nice hats in this one)

 

 

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

 

(interesting one of the girls' leather coats ... sorry couldn't get the size right on this one)

I haven't seen this photo before. Love the hats. I remember seeing some boys on Canvey Island, with a similar look, at about the same time. They inspired me to be come part of a gang of lads all out for a good time. I see a very definite link between this lot and those of us who came later. Who wouldn't want to be in Clacton with them?

post #16629 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

Little Queenie, I found this a really surprising fact. On what basis were they lampooned? When first buying that book many, many years ago I thought that the drawings were very good (probably the best thing in it, actually). Whilst they didn't fit exactly into the time-scale I would have given and some of the clothes not so widely worn in our area, I just put this down to the old 'time/space continuum' whereby styles changed slightly from region to region and over different periods. The only slight criticism I would have is that the jeans depicted were shorter than I saw worn at the time, generally speaking. (again, could be regional differences?)

I've started trawling for the relevant posts... may take a while! I think some of the discussion was off-forum and along the lines of 'wasn't seen up our way'. I'll post more when I get a minute.
post #16630 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post
 

 

 

"Is the book some of you are referring to "Spirit Of 69 - A Skinhead Bible"?"  No, that's definitely not the one i'm remembering. Wish i had bought it too.  I'm looking for it for years actually, and never saw it again...

post #16631 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Queenie View Post


I've started trawling for the relevant posts... may take a while! I think some of the discussion was off-forum and along the lines of 'wasn't seen up our way'. I'll post more when I get a minute.

If I recall correctly, it was way back in the first few hundred pages or so, if that helps narrow it down.

 

Before all this interwebiddybobbins, it was a massive source of information, even if the rest of the book was irrelevant.

post #16632 of 18914
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flWmmTxPDaM&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Some geezer talking about his encounter with "bovver boys"
post #16633 of 18914

I remember reading that book and trying to remember the drawings when I was 15 or so at "See Hear" on St Mark's Place. I think was the "Skinhead" book by Nick Knight, wish I bought it instead of just flipping through it for years.

post #16634 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Queenie View Post

I've already told you that.. are you becoming forgetful, Mr. M?!

terminally.
post #16635 of 18914
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post


Yes roytonboy,I read the Playlist.I thought at the time of reading the book that ,for a "Mod" Club,Jamaican Sounds were very sparsely represented.This was confirmed by the Liverpool exMods I spoke to, who visited the "Wheel"(`65/`67).Compared with the "Sink" it was nearly non-existant(their words not mine).I went to a couple of the later "Wheel" Nights-before it closed down and none were played. yet "Polk Salad Annie" and "Hey,Hey Kiss Him Goodbye"were spun as original "Wheel" Spins.

By the time that "Double Barrel",Monkey Spanner" etc.came out,I regarded Reggae as pure pop.

 

browniecj, what would have been the ratio of Soul:Reggae in your area? I would suspect in the Manchester region it would generally have been less than 10:1, maybe even as low as 20:1 depending on venue. I seem to recall, however, that The Blue Note Club in Manchester city centre was known for playing more Reggae. (by which I mean I recall reading that, I never went there).

 

Like you I was surprised to hear Polk Salad Annie being played when we attended a recent 'nighter' at the Wheel.

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