or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mod to Suedehead - Page 1064

post #15946 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post
 

I had a look  for pictures online and there were a few,but no ladies,in one of the earlier pictures you put up from the 60s there was a lovely girl and I had  hoped that the ladies would be there celebrating as well as the blokes.

I have a theory though that ( most ) girls move on fashion wise faster than men, and that they are not so nostalgic,which may be why we don't get any female "originals" on here ? ( shame ).

Fashions and styles in the 1960s moved at a tremendous rate. You can date what year a photo was taken, by the amount of shirt-cuff protruding from a gents suit sleeve, or the trouser length, the type of finish on the polish of a shoe, or turn-up on jeans. A woman could identify the month of the year, and  the day of the week the photo was taken by the un-subtle way that ladies fashion changed back then (and has changed since). This may be a misogynistic hypothesis, but women have been a lot more concerned with, 'fashion' than they have been with 'style'. I have a lot less embarrassing 'what the F was I wearing then' photos than Mrs. Inks has. Another fast moving fashion decade for both male and female was the 1980s (which I opted out of in it's entirety) A bloke might be concerned with the 5mm difference in tie-clip length, or collar-roll on a BD shirt over a 1 year period. A ladies skirt length may have dropped 20 inches, changed fabric, colour and overall style in half of that time-frame.

I only say this, because my first wife would pay twice as much as myself on a shoddy pair of 'designer' hoofs, as I would on a pair of hand-made heels. She'd wear them maybe twice and chuck 'em in the back of the closet. I'm still rocking my onesans 15 years later. Primark aside, women really do get F'd-over when it comes to cloth.

post #15947 of 18818

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

Off topic maybe. But I saw these, and just got so effing angry when I vidi'd them.

post #15948 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

Off topic maybe. But I saw these, and just got so effing angry when I vidi'd them.

I have never liked Kickers...they look like toddlers first shoes,colours and all.

post #15949 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post
 

I have never liked Kickers...they look like toddlers first shoes,colours and all.

Kickers are bad enough (shoes for deaf French kids was the rumour going round my 'ecole'), but Kicker 'Brogues'. Non !

post #15950 of 18818

Some Japanese ladies from a 1969 fashion mag.

post #15951 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

Kickers are bad enough (shoes for deaf French kids was the rumour going round my 'ecole'), but Kicker 'Brogues'. Non !

One mans meat ...I was chuckling yesterday about those non brogue DM shoes,spastic shoes in my book..and before anyone kicks off about the word spastic it wasn't an insult back then.

post #15952 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post
 

One mans meat ...I was chuckling yesterday about those non brogue DM shoes,spastic shoes in my book..and before anyone kicks off about the word spastic it wasn't an insult back then.

Apparently Kickers had a red dot on one sole, and a green dot on one sole as some sort of deaf-code, and the soles were made of a certain rubber, so deaf kids could feel vibrations. Absolute BS, but funny as F for those of us that hated them.

.

post #15953 of 18818

The Kickers look like something you would buy for a five year old. Many 'adult' clothes today seem to be an extension of what childrens' wear is. Men dress like overgrown babies and children.

 

Going back to boots I vaguely remember rubber-soled commando boots. In the late '60s you were never far away from an Army and Navy store that supplied cheap clothing and footwear. I bought officer boots and jungle greens from an A&N near Fords motor works.They generally sold to Ford factory workers but we bought our street wear there. I quickly moved on to the 'softer' end of the skinhead 'outfits' when we stopped hanging about on street corners and started to go to pubs and clubs that had a strict clothes policy. Gangs that stayed local kept to the hard look but my mob travelled over London, going back to our roots in East London, occasionally visiting the Lyceum West End and even venturing to the Old Kent Road and Borough when we felt really brave.We were open to new changing ideas in clothes as worn by other mobs. None of my mates wore hobnail or steel toe capped boots. We would have laughed at anyone wearing them. I don't remember many shops selling DM's (we called them 'Martens', with a soft T) in 1968 but we bought ours from Blackmans in Brick Lane.I don't remember them being that expensive but anyway you only needed one pair. When mine became old I wore them on building site summer jobs. We kept them clean, polished and shiny when new but never bothered to clean them when used as workwear.

Nails through the sole was a problem and we repaired them over mums gas stove with a hot flat knife. Repairs were a bit hit and miss and that's when the boots usually became workwear.

post #15954 of 18818

My Mob bought their first Harringtons (Baracutas) from the Squire shop (He did sell them then) in late 1969. I remember that I was a bit dissapointed because I thought Harringtons were American (after watching Peyton Place) and mine had 'Made in England' on the label. Mine was bottle green and we all tried to have different colours but not black . I seem to remember that black became the main colour for knock-off Harringtons as sold in Millets and in the market. What puzzles me is when Millets started to sell them because I don't remember any knock off Harringtons in my area before 1970. Did Millets sell them earlier? Because we paid a premium for our Harringtons we looked down on copies but by the time everyone was wearing them we had moved on anyway.


Edited by Bob the Badger - 11/7/13 at 3:35am
post #15955 of 18818

Regarding jeans, everyone in my area wanted Red Tab 501's in the mid late '60s. The type you sat in the bath in and waited for them to shrink 4 inches in length and 1 inch in the waist. In 1970 I bought a pair of ready shrunk Orange tab Levi's (from Millets?) but I always regarded them as inferior. I then went on to wear Lee Rider jeans and I wear Lee to this day. Like many of us I still bought Levi cords and Sta Prest in 68/69/70.

Jeans sold today bare no comparison to what was once sold. This comment goes for many other items of clothing including footwear and shirts.

If you lived in or around London in 1969 it was possible to buy good quality clothes at reasonable prices. Today I find it almost impossible to buy on the high street. What is on offer is cheap and shite or expensive and shite. Take your pick.

post #15956 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post

Regarding jeans, everyone in my area wanted Red Tab 501's in the mid late '60s. The type you sat in the bath in and waited for them to shrink 4 inches in length and 1 inch in the waist. In 1970 I bought a pair of ready shrunk Orange tab Levi's (from Millets?) but I always regarded them as inferior. I then went on to wear Lee Rider jeans and I wear Lee to this day. Like many of us I still bought Levi cords and Sta Prest in 68/69/70.
Jeans sold today bare no comparison to what was once sold. This comment goes for many other items of clothing including footwear and shirts.
If you lived in or around London in 1969 it was possible to buy good quality clothes at reasonable prices. Today I find it almost impossible to buy on the high street. What is on offer is cheap and shite or expensive and shite. Take your pick.

Marks stuff was 90% British in those days. When that policy stopped many suppliers folded so imported tat is often all that is available now..

Regarding jeans, there is a good thread on Wrangler MWZ13 http://forums.filmnoirbuff.com/viewtopic.php?id=15044
post #15957 of 18818

Regarding Harringtons, yes Millets sold them from about 1969 in my area (Chelmsford) and I had a navy one.  Friends that had the Baracuta could not really detect much of an improvement over the Millets version, I recall. We all tried to have different colours too!  In pursuit of that objective some ended up with some odd colours including I think a two-tone beige!

 

By late 1970 we had all sold them to the 'next level' of kids to fund the next project - whatever that was.....

post #15958 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Thats a shame,I can remember your sheepskin very well, you sometimes wore a badge in the sheepskin lapel,I had a slightly darker one with brown sheepskin collar/lapels.
On e bay sheepskins seem quite reasonably priced,I am guessing that they are not too popular at the moment,I said that I wouldnt have another one but I did think that one would look good with jeans and a pair of brown Paraboot Michael.
They are a great coat for a dry cold day  IMO.
BTW,I hope that you have restricted  your mrs access to the loft now or your Monkey boots will be going missing next !

Bloody hell, you got a good memory! I used to wear a Union Jack button badge in the lapel, in fact it was almost welded to it (this was during my dark 'dalliance with the far right' days). Monkey boots safe and sound and under lock and key under the stairs. smile.gif
post #15959 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

Fashions and styles in the 1960s moved at a tremendous rate. You can date what year a photo was taken, by the amount of shirt-cuff protruding from a gents suit sleeve, or the trouser length, the type of finish on the polish of a shoe, or turn-up on jeans. A woman could identify the month of the year, and  the day of the week the photo was taken by the un-subtle way that ladies fashion changed back then (and has changed since). This may be a misogynistic hypothesis, but women have been a lot more concerned with, 'fashion' than they have been with 'style'. I have a lot less embarrassing 'what the F was I wearing then' photos than Mrs. Inks has. Another fast moving fashion decade for both male and female was the 1980s (which I opted out of in it's entirety) A bloke might be concerned with the 5mm difference in tie-clip length, or collar-roll on a BD shirt over a 1 year period. A ladies skirt length may have dropped 20 inches, changed fabric, colour and overall style in half of that time-frame.

I only say this, because my first wife would pay twice as much as myself on a shoddy pair of 'designer' hoofs, as I would on a pair of hand-made heels. She'd wear them maybe twice and chuck 'em in the back of the closet. I'm still rocking my onesans 15 years later. Primark aside, women really do get F'd-over when it comes to cloth.

I think it is an Englishwoman's disease.  Italian girls are far more interested in style, buy fewer but much better clothes, keep them much longer and generally look chicer for it.  French too, but I think that is changing fast.

 

Returning to the Englishwoman, thankfully they are not all alike and Original Modernist, Gill Evans who coined the term 'Continentalist' in the very early 60s does like to look back and has, she told me yesterday, joined Style Forum.  So we may soon be able to do what cerneabbas was wanting.


Edited by Mr Knightley - 11/7/13 at 7:15am
post #15960 of 18818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post
 

Regarding Harringtons, yes Millets sold them from about 1969 in my area (Chelmsford) and I had a navy one.  Friends that had the Baracuta could not really detect much of an improvement over the Millets version, I recall. We all tried to have different colours too!  In pursuit of that objective some ended up with some odd colours including I think a two-tone beige!

 

By late 1970 we had all sold them to the 'next level' of kids to fund the next project - whatever that was.....


A mate of mine ended up with a lime green one that at the time we all thought was great. Another friend had a almost brilliant white one. We never went down the two-tone route though. I can't remember what casual jacket if any I bought after that (in the 90s I had a Ralph Lauren) but I did have a Levi jean jacket for a while when it all started to go wrong in the 1970s

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead