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Mod to Suedehead - Page 1042

post #15616 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingstonian View Post


Exactly. At my age, I should be able to buy all my clothes in the High Street - but sadly that is not the case. Down the pub today almost everyone was badly dressed. People think you are 'stylish' if you are are wearing a jacket that buttons up rather than a fleece or zipper jacket. That is the way of the world. You either try harder or go with the flow.

Interesting what you say about the people in the pub,I think that there seems to be 3 main categories,

1, People who just don't care what they look like, ( scruffy fcuckers ).

2,People who dress practically with no thought for style, ie wearing a fleece on a cold day,or trainers because they are comfy.

3,More discerning people who take an interest in style and their appearance ( I suppose there is a sub group here of people who care but just get it wrong ).

 

I have sometimes tried to analyse why the way that I dress is important to me,the only reason I can think of is some kind of self satisfaction,I know that I am not too worried about what other people think of my dress sense ( apart from the GF,I know that she appreciates me dressing smartly ).

When you say about trying harder,I think that finding good quality smart looking clobber is becoming much harder year on year ( not one for going with the flow though,that would be dumbing down IMO ).

post #15617 of 18596

cerneabbas, I'm not sure if your question about 1971 and the evolution coming to an abrupt end got the response it might have deserved.  I have been struggling to think how I might reply.

 

This piece I was asked to do over on Ask Andy some seven years ago now sets out the way it was for me.  It is, on reflection, a bit stilted in places but you will get the message.

 

http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?57062-Skinhead-to-Smooth&highlight=skinhead+smooth

 

If you have seen it before, please ignore or whatever.  The point I am trying to make is that things did change subtly over the period from about 1965 to (for me) mid 1970 and then bang!  a huge change that moved everyone in a completely different direction.

 

Despite that, you could still feel good about yourself by knowing the right shops - Squire Shop, Village Gate, Jones / Quincy, Take 6 etc. But it was a period I always struggled with.

post #15618 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post
 

cerneabbas, I'm not sure if your question about 1971 and the evolution coming to an abrupt end got the response it might have deserved.  I have been struggling to think how I might reply.

 

This piece I was asked to do over on Ask Andy some seven years ago now sets out the way it was for me.  It is, on reflection, a bit stilted in places but you will get the message.

 

http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?57062-Skinhead-to-Smooth&highlight=skinhead+smooth

 

If you have seen it before, please ignore or whatever.  The point I am trying to make is that things did change subtly over the period from about 1965 to (for me) mid 1970 and then bang!  a huge change that moved everyone in a completely different direction.

 

Despite that, you could still feel good about yourself by knowing the right shops - Squire Shop, Village Gate, Jones / Quincy, Take 6 etc. But it was a period I always struggled with.

Mr Knightley.Thanks for that,I also thought that it should have been discussed further.

I have read your piece for Ask Andy before but it was worth reading again as you have put some thought into it.

I find it difficult to be objective when discussing it because I didn't like it ( you and your GF have a much more subtle take on it than I remember being generally seen ).

I seem to come across as hostile when posting about the changing look,its not hostility towards anyone that I am discussing it with,its the subject that makes me bristle.

When assessing what I want to take from the past into my present or future look,there is nothing from that period that interests me,I think that says a lot.

post #15619 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post
 

Mr Knightley.Thanks for that,I also thought that it should have been discussed further.

I have read your piece for Ask Andy before but it was worth reading again as you have put some thought into it.

I find it difficult to be objective when discussing it because I didn't like it ( you and your GF have a much more subtle take on it than I remember being generally seen ).

I seem to come across as hostile when posting about the changing look,its not hostility towards anyone that I am discussing it with,its the subject that makes me bristle.

When assessing what I want to take from the past into my present or future look,there is nothing from that period that interests me,I think that says a lot.

Agreed, mate.  Nothing from that period can be found in my wardrobe today - with the exception of my favourite fragrance from the time, Eau Sauvage which is still stunning IMO.

 

More here about the birth of Mod

 

http://djpennylane.blogspot.ca/2013/10/mod-before-mod-continentalists.html

post #15620 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post
 

Agreed, mate.  Nothing from that period can be found in my wardrobe today - with the exception of my favourite fragrance from the time, Eau Sauvage which is still stunning IMO.

 

More here about the birth of Mod

 

http://djpennylane.blogspot.ca/2013/10/mod-before-mod-continentalists.html

One thing that I have been thinking about recently is how there were certain clothes that I would not have been seen dead wearing in 70/71 that I am now interested in,at first I thought that was due to me getting older but I now realise that the uniform look and the mindset then probably stifled my appreciation of clothes outside of our look.

Now without those ( self imposed ) restraints I enjoy looking at clothes / shoes with an open mind,the only question being will they fit in with my existing clothes.

 

I have also been thinking since last weeks Barbour debate about how some items were taken from city gents,crombies,umbrellas,silk ties,brogues...if this was a conscious bid to dress "upmarket", then if Barbours would have been considered as "posh peoples wear" then they may have become part of the look,however they were just seen as practical country wear then as they weren't gentrified until 1980ish.

post #15621 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post
 

More here about the birth of Mod

 

http://djpennylane.blogspot.ca/2013/10/mod-before-mod-continentalists.html

There is brief reference in this text about the influence of continental style on the Mod movement. I am very interested on 60s Italian style, red a little on the subject, and this is just a little reflection about it. Hope i'm not too off topic, but i think that Italian style (in the wider meaning) really influenced mods...To suedeheads. (As usual, my English is not perfect, sorry for that.)

 

Is Italian style an art ?

 

The renowned Italian style for men seemed to appear just after the end of WW2. Then, Italian style, on the sides of the more conservative English style and of the more relaxed American style, became a new reference for elegance. 

In the early fifties appeared the main line of Italian style for men, very distinctive : bright and pastel colors, fitted suits, dark ties, black or white poplin shirts, knitted polos, silk striped jackets, black shades, etc... Then on, until the late sixties, the influence on European (and maybe even American) men's style is mainly italian.

 

There is an explanation on that: Italy at the time is at its heights. The Italian style can not be separate from the post-war economical success, the force of the textile industry and craftmanship, and from the explosion of italian design and Cinema. Movies are sartorial testimonies of the time: Marcello Mastroianni in Fellini's "Dolce vita", Alain Delon in Visconti's "Rocco e i suoi fratelli" and Antonioni's "L'eclisse", Alain Delon and Maurice Ronet in Clement's "Plein soleil" (Purple noon:  a French movie, but shot in Italy).

 

In the sixties Italian style, everything has a meaning: clothes are fitted, but with a little room to be relaxed, the length of the trousers is short but still smart,  the short jacket and short trousers are said to come from the scooter use: more practical...

 

In the time (and still now, i guess) four cities were influential:

Rome, the capital city, leader of fashion in 1960; Milan, with all the small tailors that became fashion icons and industries; Napoli, city of the Camorra gangster's with their striped suits, Panama, and bicolore shoes; and Firenze knowned for quality footwear... 

 

So yes, in my opinion, Italian style: design, cinema,  and clothing, is an art, still influential to this day.


Edited by Clouseau - 10/20/13 at 5:46am
post #15622 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Interesting what you say about the people in the pub,I think that there seems to be 3 main categories,
1, People who just don't care what they look like, ( scruffy fcuckers ).
2,People who dress practically with no thought for style, ie wearing a fleece on a cold day,or trainers because they are comfy.
3,More discerning people who take an interest in style and their appearance ( I suppose there is a sub group here of people who care but just get it wrong ).

I have sometimes tried to analyse why the way that I dress is important to me,the only reason I can think of is some kind of self satisfaction,I know that I am not too worried about what other people think of my dress sense ( apart from the GF,I know that she appreciates me dressing smartly ).
When you say about trying harder,I think that finding good quality smart looking clobber is becoming much harder year on year ( not one for going with the flow though,that would be dumbing down IMO ).

I find with people especially on the Skinhead scene, Their is people who think they are smart, people who are smart, people who have not a clue..and people who don't care a fcuk. biggrin.gif
post #15623 of 18596


Portsmouth Mods @ the Mecca approx. 1968/9

I'm not sure of those dates though?
post #15624 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunty View Post



Portsmouth Mods @ the Mecca approx. 1968/9

I'm not sure of those dates though?

Black / dark shirt and white / lighter tie - oh dear!
Edited by Mr Knightley - 10/20/13 at 1:17pm
post #15625 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
 

There is brief reference in this text about the influence of continental style on the Mod movement. I am very interested on 60s Italian style, red a little on the subject, and this is just a little reflection about it. Hope i'm not too off topic, but i think that Italian style (in the wider meaning) really influenced mods...To suedeheads. (As usual, my English is not perfect, sorry for that.)

 

Is Italian style an art ?

 

The renowned Italian style for men seemed to appear just after the end of WW2. Then, Italian style, on the sides of the more conservative English style and of the more relaxed American style, became a new reference for elegance.

In the early fifties appeared the main line of Italian style for men, very distinctive : bright and pastel colors, fitted suits, dark ties, black or white poplin shirts, knitted polos, silk striped jackets, black shades, etc... Then on, until the late sixties, the influence on European (and maybe even American) men's style is mainly italian.

 

There is an explanation on that: Italy at the time is at its heights. The Italian style can not be separate from the post-war economical success, the force of the textile industry and craftmanship, and from the explosion of italian design and Cinema. Movies are sartorial testimonies of the time: Marcello Mastroianni in Fellini's "Dolce vita", Alain Delon in Visconti's "Rocco e i suoi fratelli" and Antonioni's "L'eclisse", Alain Delon and Maurice Ronet in Clement's "Plein soleil" (Purple noon:  a French movie, but shot in Italy).

 

In the sixties Italian style, everything has a meaning: clothes are fitted, but with a little room to be relaxed, the length of the trousers is short but still smart,  the short jacket and short trousers are said to come from the scooter use: more practical...

 

In the time (and still now, i guess) four cities were influential:

Rome, the capital city, leader of fashion in 1960; Milan, with all the small tailors that became fashion icons and industries; Napoli, city of the Camorra gangster's with their striped suits, Panama, and bicolore shoes; and Firenze knowned for quality footwear...

 

So yes, in my opinion, Italian style: design, cinema,  and clothing, is an art, still influential to this day.

Alain Delon was also dressed well in Melville's films, as were the women (especially Cathy Rosier in Le Samourai) But Melville had a very American-influenced style. Jean Seberg in Godard's, A bout de soufflé is very Mod.

As for the Italian style of 60s cinema, I think Marcello Mastroianni was one of the best dressed gents, especially in Otto e Mezzo. The square, Prada spr07f he wears, are the best sunglasses I've ever seen.

post #15626 of 18596


Brian "Dobbie" Dolan 1971
post #15627 of 18596
another well known pic:


and some new additions i´ve not seen on here before:




plus a background story:

"As the (Anti- english occupation of Northern Ireland) march entered Renfield Street, James Cook (16, Glasgow), who was carrying one pole of a banner bearing IRA slogans, was slashed in the neck with an open razor by Brian Stewart (17, Glasgow), an apprentice electrician. Stewart was seen to draw the open razor from his pocket and severely injure Cook, causing a seven-inch wound which exposed the jugular vein.

Plain clothed Detective Inspector George Johnston (44), who was in the front of the Irish sympathisers’ march, saw what had happened and went after Brian Stewart, who had tried to run away. In the end, he caught Stewart but Johnston himself was slashed as well during a struggle in which the youth brought the razor down on the right side of D.I. Johnston’s face. The wound was four-and-a-half inches long and needed 2 stitches.”
post #15628 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunty View Post



Brian "Dobbie" Dolan 1971


Superb pic, various lengths of hair, some cracking suits, all displaying various style elements, jacket bottoms, square, and rounded, lapels in various widths and shapes

post #15629 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post


Black / dark shirt and white / lighter tie - oh dear!


He looks like he did alright with it thou ;-)

post #15630 of 18596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pressure_Drop View Post

Just found this photo of my brother-in-law, Gareth, he grew up in Exeter - think this was his last civvy photo before he joined the Army in 1969ish as a boy soldier (he left a few years back - Brigadier or something, not bad for a council house kiddy). I think he's got a touch of the young David Bowie about him.

Do you think that's a dog ear collar shirt he's wearing?

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