or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mod to Suedehead - Page 1002

post #15016 of 18395

Now over 1000 pages. What ever happened to the bloke who started it? Where is 'Spirit of 69' ? Someone should tell him he created a monster.

post #15017 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

Did many of the original Skins that later adopted the Suedehead style come back to the Trad Skin style with the second wave of Skins in the late 70s ? I'm only 45, but I remember a lot of older Skins well into their 20s back in the late 70s that obviously weren't new Skins. Or were they probably blokes that were Suedeheads first that later adopted the earlier Trad look after everything started getting a bit flarey ?

Suedehead has always seen a bit transitional. The bits I like from Suedehead style are the bits carried over from Hard Mods and Skins, I can't get on with the Ruperts, tank tops and some of the shoes.

Like I said, I was pretty young during the second wave, went on to Mod. Losing my hair at 19 didn't help. I found myself having to adopt the Ivy look as anything Trad made me look like a rabid pit-bull. Being a dead-ringer for a certain Mr.Courtney doesn't help.

 

 

Interesting point

 

I have never let go of my skinhead roots but in 1977 ish when the 2nd wave appeared I had no interest whatsoever in their trend as their style was an exaggeration of what we had in 69/71 and was not for me when you have had the real deal

 

Their jeans were higher and tighter, braces worn hanging down from waist, boots were higher legged, hair shorter, Tee shirts with motifs, racist and political attitudes.  They also did not seem to have a dress code for smart wear ie for clubs or meeting girlfriends - no smart suits or casual wear.

 

They had their own take on the style and it was their time

 

I was 23 / 24 by then and living and working in Spain and Germany and to be dressed like the 2nd wave would have looked daft on me at that age and I wanted to blend in with the crowd and not stand out.  I had no political statements to make.  In Germany then I encountered several incidences where German skinhead fanatics relishing the old Nazis ways tried to intimidate Brits working in their country - no chance

 

I think at the time I was wearing smart sports jacket (suit type) and trousers for evening wear and Lois jeans and slip on shoes for day wear.  Polo shirts but not the Fred Perry brand - something else.  I remember 'cap sleeve' ?? T shirts with the high shoulder sleeve.

 

I also never had an issue with losing my hair at a young age.  Having had a Wahl electric clippers for 35 years I have saved a fortune in that time from not visiting the barbers.  In that time my hair has been number 1 which was shorter than the 1/2 inch crop back in our day

 

One of our old gang had dealings with Mr Courtney in his line of business

post #15018 of 18395

Yes congrats to all contributors for making this thread attain over 1000 pages.  its good and interesting reading from various ages, all areas of Britain together with a world wide input

 

Sometimes the thread varies off course but it needs to be remembered that its a forum therefore freedom of speech.  An item someone posts will trigger someone's memory and out pours information that we have not recalled since kids and a debate emerges.

 

We have a lot of characters on here with sensible contributions and I have had pleasure in thinking ' Christ I remember that' or 'I had one of those' and the old memory starts clicking through the motions

 

I am glad I found this thread and have been able to contribute and also enjoy other like minded peoples recollections especially before old age and Alzheimer's kicks in

post #15019 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by dusttruffle View Post
 

forgive the ignorance, but what is "sticksman"?

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6Q3FeAdrIQ

 

The Black Bad boys of the seventies and 80s . Petty Theivery and Mugging but doing it in style . ( if that is not a contridiction in itself )

post #15020 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post

Now over 1000 pages. What ever happened to the bloke who started it? Where is 'Spirit of 69' ? Someone should tell him he created a monster.

He is over on the AAAC forum under a different name. He does not come on here much now.
post #15021 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

I did say a while back that this thread should have stayed Mod to Suedehead and spawned new threads ( such as What came after Suedeheads etc etc ).
The way the thread has gone lately makes me think it even more.

What came after the Skinheads 68/70..for some 71, I have no real interest....I lived through it and rather forget it......
post #15022 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aces and Eights View Post
 

Interesting point

 

I have never let go of my skinhead roots but in 1977 ish when the 2nd wave appeared I had no interest whatsoever in their trend as their style was an exaggeration of what we had in 69/71 and was not for me when you have had the real deal

 

Their jeans were higher and tighter, braces worn hanging down from waist, boots were higher legged, hair shorter, Tee shirts with motifs, racist and political attitudes.  They also did not seem to have a dress code for smart wear ie for clubs or meeting girlfriends - no smart suits or casual wear.

 

They had their own take on the style and it was their time

 

 

 

 

A bit of a stereotyping of the later waves of skinhead! Think we've had it on here before, there wasnt just one wave after 77, but a number , all with different influences from music, politics - including none - and age and location and also with different looks. And also overlapping with each other

post #15023 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post
 

 

sticksman look was at least 3 years before ' Casual ' though . The Reggae look incoprprated Burberry trenchcoats long before the football lot got involved 

 

Whos talking about football? Plenty of blokes didnt go to football and the main elements of the casual look, as in my post, were already embedded years ahead of the 'casual' look from football, having a drink down Hackney Road or up the Angel in 76/77.

post #15024 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post


What came after the Skinheads 68/70..for some 71, I have no real interest....I lived through it and rather forget it......

Same as me....that's why I suggested another thread....I think more threads would keep this one more "on subject" .

post #15025 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post
 

 

Whos talking about football? Plenty of blokes didnt go to football and the main elements of the casual look, as in my post, were already embedded years ahead of the 'casual' look from football, having a drink down Hackney Road or up the Angel in 76/77.

 

I got to plead guilty to mentioning football....when I see Casual mentioned I always think football Casual because that was where I used to see it most.

post #15026 of 18395

 


Totally off topic but this was the magnetic football game I had as a boy. I looked on ebay to see if it was worth selling but in the end it went to the tip.

post #15027 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Same as me....that's why I suggested another thread....I think more threads would keep this one more "on subject" .

For me personally from 72 to 75 was a awful period...The cloths just got stupid..and the ex disciplined skinheads just lost it...with drink, drugs , and violence..loyalties went out the window....maybe it was because we was getting older and lost our innocence.
The period 68 too 71 was a glorious time and thats why i like this thread...
post #15028 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post


For me personally from 72 to 75 was a awful period...The cloths just got stupid..and the ex disciplined skinheads just lost it...with drink, drugs , and violence..loyalties went out the window....maybe it was because we was getting older and lost our innocence.
The period 68 too 71 was a glorious time and thats why i like this thread...

 

Interesting you should mention drugs...as kids we thought hippies take drugs,skinheads hate drugs,as the 70s went on drugs seemed to become more widespread.

I still think that drug use exploded in the early 80s,up until then the war against drugs could have been won after that it was to firmly entrenched in society,now its just part of life for a LOT of people.

post #15029 of 18395
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Interesting you should mention drugs...as kids we thought hippies take drugs,skinheads hate drugs,as the 70s went on drugs seemed to become more widespread.
I still think that drug use exploded in the early 80s,up until then the war against drugs could have been won after that it was to firmly entrenched in society,now its just part of life for a LOT of people.

Cerneabbas as skinheads we hated Hippies and Drugs...But some lads fell by the wayside as they grew their hair longer and ended up looking like the hippies they once hated.
I was chatting to a couple of my mates last year from the 60s and was surprised they took drugs from around 72...Me i have never taken drugs....Beer has always been my downfall,biggrin.gif
post #15030 of 18395
Music -When I first started to go to a soul club in late 1970, having just turned 16, the music played was a mixture of current soul and Motown hits and older soul and Motown tracks, many of which I had never heard before. The club was in a small town called Shaw which was about 10 or 11 miles from Manchester city centre and, as such, was heavily influenced by the Twisted Wheel club in Manchester. I have no doubt the DJ, who was several years older than us, was or had been a regular at the 'Wheel' as I have subsequently discovered virtually all the records played were also favourites in the city centre. Some of the older regulars also frequented the Twisted Wheel until it was closed down a few months later. At this time the club was almost exclusively 'skinhead', in it's widest sense - you didn't have to have a crop to get in but if you weren't wearing the style you would have looked and no doubt felt out of place. No problem for me, of course, as by that time I was well into the whole scene as were all the lads I went with. The type of music played covered a wide range of soul styles - not only those that would later become 'Northern' soul classics (The Snake - Al Wilson, Soul Time - Shirley Ellis, Little Piece Of Leather - Donny Elbert)) but also records that would not be played at a 'Northern' venue these days (Uptight - Stevie Wonder, Sweetest Feeling - Jackie Wilson, Saturday Night At The Movies - The Drifters, Hey Girl Don't Bother Me - The Tams).  We appreciated that these were old records but understood that they had been danced to in the mod era (some of my mates older brothers had gone to the same club 2 or 3 years earlier). There was the odd reggae/ska track such as Al Capone by Prince Buster, but there would be only 2 or three of these a night. We embraced these sounds as 'our' music and knew that most kids weren't into it and that it wasn't what people were listening to elsewhere.This made it, like our style of dress, special to us or 'exclusive' if you prefer that term. Most towns round and about had a similar style of soul club, such a the 'Chambers' in Rochdale or at the very least a venue where this type of music was played once a week, such as the 'Candlelight Club' in Oldham, which, bizarrely was a Monday night (and, take it from me, you wouldn't have be been seen there any other night of the week!) I'm pretty sure this was the case right across the north of England at that time. So popular did this type of music become that the record companies started to re-release some of these previously unsuccessful tracks - Heaven Must Have Sent You by the Elgins is one that springs to mind - that proved to be big hits second time around. I have read or heard that some of these records didn't 'chart' because their popularity was so localised that the people who drew up the charts (called the HIT PARADE back then!) thought the record companies were trying to manipulate the charts by mass buying in a particular region. As M-O-M has stated we regarded ourselves as 'Soul Fans' - no distinction was made. It was a coincidence that much of this music was from cities in the northern states of the USA such as Detroit and Chicago, but we also danced to Green Onions by Booker T & the MGs , Ride Your Pony by  Lee Dorsey and Memphis Soul Stew by King Curtis which were all from, well, Memphis! To this day the best example of soul dancing I have ever seen was in this small town club by a lad dancing to 'Satisfaction' by Otis Redding -- absolutely spellbinding and not a back-drop in sight. I never heard the term 'Northern Soul' at this time. Sometimes this type of music was referred to as 'Rhythm and Soul' - Yankmod, you may have come across the term 'Uptown Soul' or simply 'Uptown' which I believe was also used. We just called it soul music. It was here and then that I first learned to dance, first 'got off' with girls (all of them skinheads) and in fact laid the foundations of my social life pretty much ever since.
 
I attended this club until 1972 and the same kind of music was played throughout. By this time we had gone through the suedehead fashion, which to me was just a smarter version of skinhead - other than the smarter clothes we were just the same. In 1972 the club started to get quieter and quieter until, in the end, it closed down. I knew the writing was on the wall that spring when a good friend of mine, Herbie, a soul fan and suedehead  like myself at that time, and I were chatting to a girl in Royton Youth Club when the DJ played a record and Herbie said, "This is a Great Record!" On the dance floor some girls were doing a contrived dance, swinging their arms across their chest and lifting their knees to the beat - the record? "Rock and Roll"  by Gary Glitter. I couldn't believe it. "You what!?!?!" I exclaimed.  Of course, he had seen the future and I hadn't. It really was the beginning of the end. Some tried to keep the look of the terraces alive with Doc Martens, wide fitting jeans, Rupert trousers and football jumpers etc. but really, most young kids were looking at Mr. Glitter, David Bowie and Slade as their style icons.By December of that year youth style had been transformed. Apologies if I've told this story before. Some lads from school were going to going to a Christmas disco at another school and asked if I would go (always a bit of safety in numbers....) Whilst there I got off with a girl from our school (coals to Newcastle?) who was a couple of years younger than me, but a fine looking lass. She was with her older sister. 12 months previously both had been suedeheads, now both were wearing baggy white trousers, platform shoes and wearing glitter make up around their eyes. Incidentally, Herbie really had seen the future as he ultimately married that girl we'd been talking to.
 
After the suedehead look petered out I was at a bit of a loss, fashion-wise. We had moved from Royton at Easter 1972 and I was studying for my A-levels so didn't get out much, other than to football, where I was still wearing elements of the skinhead/suedehead/boot boy look. I'd even grown my hair a bit, but all in all was not really in a good place. To go away to college I had my hair cut short again (in fact, just before I started college the barber took one look at me and without saying a word attached the number three clippers and gave me a crop) Late September 1973 I turned up at teacher training college, the only skinhead in the place. I played up to the image a bit by wearing BD collared check shirts, Wranglers and Denim Jacket and of course, at the college discos, I had a particular, soul dance style. I soon got into the dress code of the more stylish students and settled in to having a great time. One of the traditions at college was that everyone in our hall of residence would gather each Thursday night in the huge television lounge to watch 'Top Of The Pops'. One night in 1975 the presenter said "And now, introducing to you the latest phenomenom  sweeping the north of England, Northern Soul" On came 'Footsie' with a dance floor full of Wigan Casino regulars doing their stuff. Someone in the television lounge shouted out "It's Roytonboy!" and everyone present looked at me and nodded their agreement. So three years after I had last been to a soul club and never having heard the term 'Northern Soul', I was immediately associated with the music and some aspects of the style. I don't class myself as a 'Northern Soul' fan per se though I do like some Northern Soul, just as I like many other styles of soul music. Like many of you, I have a particularly strong attachment to the music of my youth. 
 
So, Yankmod, I have to disagree with your assertion that Northern Soul is so named because it comes from the northern United States. If this was the case we'd refer to Stax and Atlantic soul as 'Southern Soul' which of course, we don't.  We do recognise that it is from the USA, as is nearly all soul music, and no-one is trying to take that away from you. On the subject of soul in the USA, a friend from college went on a student exchange to a university in Buffalo during college year 1974/75. Whilst there he went to see Isaac Hayes in concert. He said he was the only white person there and when he walked into the concert hall EVERYBODY turned round to look at him.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead