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post #14836 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post

Returning to the clothes, I remember that when everyone started to wear Tonik and later Trevira (cheap material that a lot of the girls seemed to wear in tonik style jackets and short skirts) the look became cheap. We moved on to Prince of Wales check (some wore complete suits with a blue or red window pane over check to indicate MTM). I had a MTM jacket in POW. Dogtooth became popular and then even Houndstooth. Of course it was all in the details, not just the material. It was always about being one step ahead. Following the crowd was not an option. I also wore off the peg blazers with patched pockets, Repp ties, White Ben Sherman, Grey Mohair MTM strides and black shoes from The Squire Shop with their red or white socks. The word Skinhead, even in my mind, brings up a picture of DM boots turned up Levi's, Brutus shirts, red braces and a no.2 haircut, but that was a small part of the story. We could not have got into Clubs,Pubs, Dance Halls etc wearing the outfits that have become more familiar in public perception from 1969.


 



Mr Badger, we have said before that our experiences were often very similar - it's that regional thing again.

By late 1969 I had also effectively dropped the more obvious skinhead items and was buying stuff mainly at the Squire Shop or Ivy Shop. I had a MTM black and white dogtooth suit (from Burtons) which looked great with plain Royals in a cordovan colour, white OCBD and striped woven silk tie. A friend of mine managed to get a bleeding madras Ivy jacket from John Simons which he wore with BD and tie and was the envy of us all. Like you, I had a pair of grey bespoke trou in mohair - mine with a faint tan stripe.

With socks I recall a more sedate approach for suits with black or dark grey (from M&S) being typical but with the brighter colours worn with a short sleeve shirt and sta prest or tailored trousers in summer. I had a pale peppermint pair from the Squire Shop that I particularly loved.
post #14837 of 18769

I would agree with above and add that in our area only about 5% wore for a severe crop look as more often depicted in stereotypes.The majority preferred the neat square cut back college boy cut.

post #14838 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post

Hello Gel boy.Just one question-why did Terry Spencer pick the Borehamwood Skins for his Camera work?

Borehamwood is the home of Elstree Film Studios...Maybe Terry Spencer was working out of there.

I spent 12 resent years in a village a couple of miles north of Borehamwood... Talking to the locals they had a big skinhead gang at the time..with their main rivals the Burnt Oak Mob,...Borehamwood was one of the New Towns build in the 50s/early 60s....Most of the people came out of the slums of N /NW London. ...One of the photos that Terry Spencer took was outside The Red Lion Pub, which i posted on here about 500 pages ago.
Terry Spencer did some nice photo's of Mods in the mid 60s..I also believe he did some photos of Punks.
post #14839 of 18769

I didn't know that about the windowpane and the MTM connection Bob?My OTP ones had a sky blue check,though red was predominent.I suppose the OTP ones we were wearing came later when they hit all the usual outlets.

I came under some flack here for proposing to be "One step ahead" or "Ahead of the game" as I put it,but that's just the way it was back then.Everything was fresh and new to us.Shoes,clothes,music,even dance steps !We weren't  like the generations that followed who chose to to cherry pick what they wanted 
from decades of previous style and fashion,putting together mis-matched  that would have been a crime years earlier.Being dressed "right" and being first was all part of the fun.
Two well known and very stylish brothers walked into our Youth Club one Friday evening wearing almost identicle sand mohair suits,white BD's,brown loafers.They looked as sharp as they always did,but there was one HUGE difference.They had both just returned from a shopping trip to London that day and had got their hair cut in a before unseen style to us.Slightly spiky,feathery at the back and sides.They had left Stafford in the morning looking like everyone else that day,they returned in the afternoon looking like no one else.Cost to them was minimal,but the impact was massive.
The way they looked that night was probably seen in every suburb all over London ,but to us it was like nothing else.
Nedless to say, we all followed,as fast as our hair could grow.
post #14840 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post
 

I didn't know that about the windowpane and the MTM connection Bob?My OTP ones had a sky blue check,though red was predominent.I suppose the OTP ones we were wearing came later when they hit all the usual outlets.

I came under some flack here for proposing to be "One step ahead" or "Ahead of the game" as I put it,but that's just the way it was back then.Everything was fresh and new to us.Shoes,clothes,music,even dance steps !We weren't  like the generations that followed who chose to to cherry pick what they wanted 
from decades of previous style and fashion,putting together mis-matched  that would have been a crime years earlier.Being dressed "right" and being first was all part of the fun.

Like a lot of the clothes they started MTM and pretty quickly (3-6 months) you could buy off-the-peg, in the same style, from market stalls and clothes shops etc. A mate of mine had the first blue windowpane check MTM POW that I saw and a week later his mate had a red windowpane check POW suit. My POW jacket was from Alexandra and my Mohair trousers were from a normal High Street Burtons.I remember the explosion in knock-off Harringtons sold from market stalls in Romford.They were everywhere within 6 months replacing the Monkey jackets previously sold by the same stalls.

post #14841 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Yeah ,and spray painted boots.When everything went terribly wrong.

 

i loved paint sprayed boots with elephant cords n south sea bubble jumpers 

post #14842 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post


More probably from Bernard Hinault...



... whose La Vie Claire team outfit was inspired by Mondiran.

The first person who came to mind when that PS Jumper was posted was Mondrian.

 

The second was Wiggins :nodding:

post #14843 of 18769
This one step ahead that has been mentioned.....The Skinhead fashion was very regimental ...you could not really wear something that was not so call skinhead style, One step ahead was really a new patten of check shirt..or colour..or when Gibsons came in. I use to wear American imported shirts from the Squire shop...I would get paid on a thursday..straight into the Squire shop and buy the latest shirt...Simmons always had a limited amount of colours or pattens..by Saturday he would of sold out of that run...so it was a good chance only you around Kilburn would have that particular shirt.
I must point out the above only applied to the Skinheads who had jobs..unless you had a rich Mum&Dad,smile.gif
post #14844 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post

I remember the explosion in knock-off Harringtons sold from market stalls in Romford.They were everywhere within 6 months replacing the Monkey jackets previously sold by the same stalls.

Millets had Harringtons. The bigger central London stores had the most colours. I never knew anyone who had a Baracuta in those days.

Made to Measure was cheap and readily available in every High Street. I remember my brother got a blazer with what we called an 'off centre vent', but is usually called a hook vent and patch pockets. You could see the clothes on TV in shows like' The Fugitive' or 'I Spy' - just play around with the contrast control to see all the detail.
post #14845 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

This one step ahead that has been mentioned.....The Skinhead fashion was very regimental ...you could not really wear something that was not so call skinhead style, One step ahead was really a new patten of check shirt..or colour..or when Gibsons came in. I use to wear American imported shirts from the Squire shop...I would get paid on a thursday..straight into the Squire shop and buy the latest shirt...Simmons always had a limited amount of colours or pattens..by Saturday he would of sold out of that run...so it was a good chance only you around Kilburn would have that particular shirt.
I must point out the above only applied to the Skinheads who had jobs..unless you had a rich Mum&Dad,smile.gif

 

:rotflmao: your funny Roy....

 

Though J Simons shops were obviously enormously influential as to the style of the time,I highly doubt he was well known throughout the rest of the country,or for that matter dressed the thousands of kids who were sporting it in one quality or another.My first visit to one of his shops was in the mid 70's,to the Ivy.I had money,was working full time and still didn't like the prices or the attitude.I may be way off here,but I am guessing you were one of the fortunate few.One of the few that it's been said,he wasn't in favor of,preferring an older money,discreet ivy inspired customer.I see him today as a nostalgic dinosaur of a retailer,clinging on in a secondary trading position with a few lifelong supportive clients and homesick yanks wanting to update the Full Gant.He was right on your doorstep.I would suggest the rest of the country for the most part were not his customer.

post #14846 of 18769
I have wrote about J Simmons before...He hated the Skinheads.. but it was the money he made from the Skinheads that allowed him to open the Squire shop..and later The Village Gate Shops..I was unaware of this at the time, and never took much notice of the man. ..in later years when i started to wear BD Shirts, Harringtons,Brogues again, I went back to the Ivy Shop and later his shop in Covent Garden, I found him a miserable cnut. yes a dinosaur ..he certainly don't like browsers in his shops.
He still has a following of people who think he is some kind of style icon...but his shop did play its part in Skinhead Fashion..I suppose mostly for London Skinheads...another shop that was used for American cloths was Reeds in Regent Street, Two of my mates who was a little older than me was more into Ivy than Skinhead..would buy Off the peg American imported suits and listen to the Drifters,:smile.gif
post #14847 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post

Returning to the clothes, I remember that when everyone started to wear Tonik and later Trevira (cheap material that a lot of the girls seemed to wear in tonik style jackets and short skirts) the look became cheap. We moved on to Prince of Wales check (some wore complete suits with a blue or red window pane over check to indicate MTM). I had a MTM jacket in POW. Dogtooth became popular and then even Houndstooth. Of course it was all in the details, not just the material. It was always about being one step ahead. Following the crowd was not an option. I also wore off the peg blazers with patched pockets, Repp ties, White Ben Sherman, Grey Mohair MTM strides and black shoes from The Squire Shop with their red or white socks. The word Skinhead, even in my mind, brings up a picture of DM boots turned up Levi's, Brutus shirts, red braces and a no.2 haircut, but that was a small part of the story. We could not have got into Clubs,Pubs, Dance Halls etc wearing the outfits that have become more familiar in public perception from 1969.


 



Mr Badger, we have said before that our experiences were often very similar - it's that regional thing again.

By late 1969 I had also effectively dropped the more obvious skinhead items and was buying stuff mainly at the Squire Shop or Ivy Shop. I had a MTM black and white dogtooth suit (from Burtons) which looked great with plain Royals in a cordovan colour, white OCBD and striped woven silk tie. A friend of mine managed to get a bleeding madras Ivy jacket from John Simons which he wore with BD and tie and was the envy of us all. Like you, I had a pair of grey bespoke trou in mohair - mine with a faint tan stripe.

With socks I recall a more sedate approach for suits with black or dark grey (from M&S) being typical but with the brighter colours worn with a short sleeve shirt and sta prest or tailored trousers in summer. I had a pale peppermint pair from the Squire Shop that I particularly loved.

Interesting and spot-on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

Borehamwood is the home of Elstree Film Studios...Maybe Terry Spencer was working out of there.

I spent 12 resent years in a village a couple of miles north of Borehamwood... Talking to the locals they had a big skinhead gang at the time..with their main rivals the Burnt Oak Mob,...Borehamwood was one of the New Towns build in the 50s/early 60s....Most of the people came out of the slums of N /NW London. ...One of the photos that Terry Spencer took was outside The Red Lion Pub, which i posted on here about 500 pages ago.
Terry Spencer did some nice photo's of Mods in the mid 60s..I also believe he did some photos of Punks.

Thanks Lasttye,just wondered.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingstonian View Post

Millets had Harringtons. The bigger central London stores had the most colours. I never knew anyone who had a Baracuta in those days.

Yep a Lemon Yellow one.smile.gif
post #14848 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post

I have wrote about J Simmons before...He hated the Skinheads.. but it was the money he made from the Skinheads that allowed him to open the Squire shop..and later The Village Gate Shops..I was unaware of this at the time, and never took much notice of the man. ..in later years when i started to wear BD Shirts, Harringtons,Brogues again, I went back to the Ivy Shop and later his shop in Covent Garden, I found him a miserable cnut. yes a dinosaur ..he certainly don't like browsers in his shops.
He still has a following of people who think he is some kind of style icon...but his shop did play its part in Skinhead Fashion..I suppose mostly for London Skinheads...another shop that was used for American cloths was Reeds in Regent Street, Two of my mates who was a little older than me was more into Ivy than Skinhead..would buy Off the peg American imported suits and listen to the Drifters,:smile.gif

He does have his "Modernist Jazz" Followers.
post #14849 of 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

rotflmao.gif  your funny Roy....

Though J Simons shops were obviously enormously influential as to the style of the time,I highly doubt he was well known throughout the rest of the country,or for that matter dressed the thousands of kids who were sporting it in one quality or another.My first visit to one of his shops was in the mid 70's,to the Ivy.I had money,was working full time and still didn't like the prices or the attitude.I may be way off here,but I am guessing you were one of the fortunate few.

I only knew the shops. I did not know the same owner had both Ivy and Squire shops. Plus I was served by Saturday staff, who seemed to change on every visit.

That said, having a real American shirt - not a Ben Sherman and having a pair of Royals gave you a sense of oneupmanship. I thought the rest of the country were really provincial and we were better than them.

Austins in Shaftesbury Avenue also sold American kit but I remember rejecting their shirts because I wanted permanant press i.e polycotton not the 100% cotton they were offering.
post #14850 of 18769
I am just wondering,were there not American Import Clothes Shops in places like Liverpool etc?I ask this because a Scouser once told me,there was a lot of that influence coming over during the 60s.I was told about Clubs like the Sink that were running the same time as the Cavern.Their main Music Policy was American Imported Records.
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