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post #14161 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post


Funnily enough we also called them Blockbusters.i picked up both terms from London lads at the time.I was the first person I knew of who wore them in my area and they gradually filtered in,so no local retailers had them.The same happened with Toppers later on.i wore them at fist with a suit with quite parrallel strides.they looked better with French flares,but they hadn't arrived yet.


Enjoying your posts regarding your memorys of this period, i've managed to pick up a couple of pairs of shoes with this sort of shape,

like yourself i wear them with wider/parrallel style trousers, for some reason shoes of this style seem to ruffle peoples feathers, French flares?

post #14162 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

I understand to a point your comment but equally you could say the same about many thing as we move forward,Also you have to consider how they were worn and complemented the "Whole Look".While I cringe at the gargantuan lapels of my later suit jackets,I was very comfortable with the whole ensemble.........at the time.
Well said. Often the more fashionable something is at the time, the quicker it goes out of fashion and is first to be mocked later. That doesn't detract from its credibility at the time.

[/quote]

My money's on them being Manchester lads, possibly even Man Utd.
post #14163 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post



Still on footwear but a bit behind the discussion about "baseball boots" - has this photo been on here before? See lad on scooter on left. Looks genuine early/mid-60s shot to me. Caption says 1 Jan 1964: "a group of mods posing on their scooters outside The Scene club in Soho, London, circa 1964".


I went to my parents over the weekend, and mentioned Baseball boots, mother confirmed that i'd had umpteen pairs as a kid,

bought from various places ( cheap ) including as Pressure Drop mentioned Woolworths, also mentioned the term bumper boots

the old man said it rang a bell but was unsure, he also said that as a kid he wanted a pair but his dad wouldn't let him have them,

im assuming this was pre Teddy boy days for him, Baseball boots and youth, a long standing association?

 

My Baseball boots summer 75

post #14164 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basset View Post


Enjoying your posts regarding your memorys of this period, i've managed to pick up a couple of pairs of shoes with this sort of shape,

like yourself i wear them with wider/parrallel style trousers, for some reason shoes of this style seem to ruffle peoples feathers, French flares?

 

 

Those Plainfronts are very nice indeed.Great toe shape and colour.

The French flares had an inverted pleat that ran down the outside leg seam.Some of them also had a V "Yoke" panel at the back,similar to the way jeans are constructed.They were short lived,about the same time as the stack heel shoes.

I just got back from a week in Barcelona/Ibiza and to my surprise i noticed that a lot of the kids ( lads and girls ) were wearing........

White Baseball Boots !!

post #14165 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Those Plainfronts are very nice indeed.Great toe shape and colour.

The French flares had an inverted pleat that ran down the outside leg seam.Some of them also had a V "Yoke" panel at the back,similar to the way jeans are constructed.They were short lived,about the same time as the stack heel shoes.

I just got back from a week in Barcelona/Ibiza and to my surprise i noticed that a lot of the kids ( lads and girls ) were wearing........

White Baseball Boots !!


Thanks for the info and comments.

 

I can confirm as a father to a soon to be fourteen year old daughter, that white Baseball boots are ' well in '

had to buy some for her a little while ago, although her and a lot of her mates call them ' hightops '

i dunno youth eh biggrin.gif

post #14166 of 18777

Never been a fan of white sneakers of any kind I can't be bothered to keep them clean, the ones you were wearing Basset are definately modeled off the classic American PF Flyers, I believe Woolworths was an American company as well ironically it went on much longer in the UK than he did here, those baseball boots technically are high tops when I was your daughters age everybody was wearing skate shoes bigger than a taxi cab.

post #14167 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, R1.1.1.M2b

If ye want a pair of top skinhead shoes from 1969 - this isn't them.
If ye want a shoe for all occasions, this isn't them.
If ye want a pair of shoes for a 60 year old bloke who's 'dressing his age' to wear with his comfy slacks and M&S wooly-pully ... this isn't them.
Buy some decent brogues.

But there was a snap shot in time when these were super cool, long after basket top norwegians and before giant stack heeled spooners.
And if everyone has a brown pair, what better than a 3-tone brown pair?!

Timeless classic they ain't and if you're wearing these with a striped Benny, you need a stern talking to at best, but I wouldn't just bash them cos they'd raise an eyebrow down at Wetherspoons. With the right outfit - why not?

The phrase 'dustbin of history' comes to mind...
post #14168 of 18777
roytonboy.Thanks for another great read,i hope that you reconsider yor premature ( IMO) retirement from writing quality posts,i am sure i am not the only one who has enjoyed them and as they are set in the "time" and include a lot of style obsevations i think that they are most relevant.You confirm my own experiences of going to a game by car,ok if its a place with no opposition but somewhere dodgy you have to go with the mob and stick together.We used to travel in transit vans quite a lot,not mini bus just an ordinary van,bit of cardboard to sit on flagon of cider and off you go,we used to get about 15/18 in them sometimes,that can be a handy little crew when you pull up at traffic lights near the ground you are visiting.You ask about Bristol,i am answering from a 60s point of view ( everythings changed now )yes largely geographical,south of the river and Somerset =City ( some individuals or enclaves Rovers) east Bristol and Gloucestershire =Rovers ( again some exceptions) and North/northwest Bristol split,some of the enclaves/exceptions maybe explained by bus routes ? all IMO and expect Pressure_Drop to have a different view.A question that i have to ask is how on earth did Scousers ( blue or red ) get this humorous,knowledgeable,good lads reputation with football commentators,when most of us who visited as away suppporters come away with such a different idea ?.
post #14169 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Those Plainfronts are very nice indeed.Great toe shape and colour.

The French flares had an inverted pleat that ran down the outside leg seam.Some of them also had a V "Yoke" panel at the back,similar to the way jeans are constructed.They were short lived,about the same time as the stack heel shoes.

I just got back from a week in Barcelona/Ibiza and to my surprise i noticed that a lot of the kids ( lads and girls ) were wearing........

White Baseball Boots !!

About the appellation" French flares". Just a supposition, but i think it may come first from the Renoma trousers wore by the Minets, that were the first (in France) that were wide in the bottoms.

Then, i think that it comes from the shop "New man", open in 1965, that later became a brand. At first, the shop sold American clothes wore by the Minets: corduroy levi's, Fruit of the loom, oxford BD.

In 1966, "New man" began to make his own trousers, called the "wide & low". Between 1966 and 1971, those trousers became very popular in France and abroad. They existed in jeans and mainly in corduroy, were low waisted, had a zipper, and were flared. Lots of colors too.

"New man" became mainstream, and the brand still exists today.

 

Source: "Des modes et des hommes" by Farid Chenoune. Mr Knightley, thanks too you i learned the existence of this book that i borrowed from the public library. The French version is sold out too...

post #14170 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

roytonboy.Thanks for another great read,i hope that you reconsider yor premature ( IMO) retirement from writing quality posts,i am sure i am not the only one who has enjoyed them and as they are set in the "time" and include a lot of style obsevations i think that they are most relevant.You confirm my own experiences of going to a game by car,ok if its a place with no opposition but somewhere dodgy you have to go with the mob and stick together.We used to travel in transit vans quite a lot,not mini bus just an ordinary van,bit of cardboard to sit on flagon of cider and off you go,we used to get about 15/18 in them sometimes,that can be a handy little crew when you pull up at traffic lights near the ground you are visiting.You ask about Bristol,i am answering from a 60s point of view ( everythings changed now )yes largely geographical,south of the river and Somerset =City ( some individuals or enclaves Rovers) east Bristol and Gloucestershire =Rovers ( again some exceptions) and North/northwest Bristol split,some of the enclaves/exceptions maybe explained by bus routes ? all IMO and expect Pressure_Drop to have a different view.A question that i have to ask is how on earth did Scousers ( blue or red ) get this humorous,knowledgeable,good lads reputation with football commentators,when most of us who visited as away suppporters come away with such a different idea ?.

 

cerneabbas - thanks for the positive feedback. I agree with your comments about scousers. Among my mates, red or blue, trips to Merseyside were acknowledged to be the most hair-raising. I remember reading Chris Lightbown's (I hope that's right) "Skinhead Guide To Safety" in the Sunday Times during that period, however, and he cited Old Trafford and Maine Road as the worst places for a visiting fan - Maine Road?!? - surely not!

 

The reason I asked about geography is that this has an impact on the skinhead/greaser split of a group of fans. The more inner city, the more skinhead influence, the more outskirts or rural, the bigger the greaser contingent was likely to be. 

post #14171 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post

About the appellation" French flares". Just a supposition, but i think it may come first from the Renoma trousers wore by the Minets, that were the first (in France) that were wide in the bottoms.

Then, i think that it comes from the shop "New man", open in 1965, that later became a brand. At first, the shop sold American clothes wore by the Minets: corduroy levi's, Fruit of the loom, oxford BD.

In 1966, "New man" began to make his own trousers, called the "wide & low". Between 1966 and 1971, those trousers became very popular in France and abroad. They existed in jeans and mainly in corduroy, were low waisted, had a zipper, and were flared. Lots of colors too.

"New man" became mainstream, and the brand still exists today.

 

Source: "Des modes et des hommes" by Farid Chenoune. Mr Knightley, thanks too you i learned the existence of this book that i borrowed from the public library. The French version is sold out too...

 

New Man opened their own shop in Mayfair in the early 80s called 'Bip' after a famous French clown I believe. I wore their stuff briefly in the late 70s / early 80s. Good quality and interesting designs I recall. John Simons sold very nice 'French flares' in 1970 for a year or two. I had one or two pairs.
post #14172 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post


Excellent picture Mr.Knightley.Captures the period of time exactly.smile.gif

 

And what a stylish period that was. I was just too young to participate being only 13 when that pic would have been taken. I suppose, looking back, my love of that mid 60s look influenced my own interpretation of skinhead, spurning as I did some of the more extreme elements and pursuing more of a West London take on it.
post #14173 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post



My money's on them being Manchester lads, possibly even Man Utd.

[/quote] Definitely not United fans with the scarf the boy in the Evvaprest jacket is wearing.

Were it in colour, I reckon that was the black and red of City's 'away' strip. (See Clouseau's excellent enlargement of the pic.)
(I could be wrong, though.) satisfied.gif

FTR: those Evvaprest jackets - green, brown, blue and black (you could get matching trousers, too), a BD shirt, a pair of Levi's and DM's were perfectly acceptable for youth club/hanging around in, in Manchester, c1970.
post #14174 of 18777
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post


Well said. Often the more fashionable something is at the time, the quicker it goes out of fashion and is first to be mocked later. That doesn't detract from its credibility at the time.

[/quote]

My money's on them being Manchester lads, possibly even Man Utd.

 

Hmmm..... such a pity it's not in colour, the scarf would tell us. It's not red and white, and it's certainly not a City Scarf as we had the 3 colours with wide and narrow bands. HOWEVER, by season 1971/72 when I estimate this to have been taken, the styles and hair length would be bang on for Manchester AND both sets of fans had taken to wearing their away colours as scarves - Red and Black for City, Blue and Yellow for United - that lad's scarf could easily be either of those. The only other option would be claret and blue suggesting Aston Villa (wrong division), Burnley (wrong division) or West Ham which would mean it's probably the season before.

 

If it IS City away at Nottingham Forest then it's probably the very match I described in a recent post.

post #14175 of 18777
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