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post #14146 of 17753

I cannot think of anything from the 70s after the suedehead period that i would want to wear today,it was bad enough wearing it then.I just dont understand why the skinhead/suedehead look lasted such a short time,or why what followed lasted so long.If you look at that picture ek77 put up of the North Sheilds lads and then watch the Millwall Panorama programme you will see the same basic long haired,baggy trousers look..the picture was 5 years before the programme.I know that clothes and shoes changed over those 5 years but the ( awful ) look remained the same,remember the thick zip up cardigans ? ( winter 75 ) or the longer starsky and hutch ones ?.By 76 i had had enough and began buying what I wanted more than what was in fashion,i even started wearing loafers,a camel coloured crombie and a few other suedehead style clothes ( not all at once ) and since then i have often worn similar clothes and shoes,but again not all at the same time.


Edited by cerneabbas - 8/6/13 at 7:23am
post #14147 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

elwood.The loafers that you mention for 71/72 sound like the "bovver moccs" that Pressure_Drop and i have mentioned,i also had a brown pair but i never saw anyone else with brown.

Very much so, cerneabbas. I saw the photo of a more modern version that was posted then and it was quite similar.
post #14148 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

MikeDT.Do you mean platform shoes? they were about in 75...the stacks that elwood mentions were definitely 72/73 in Bristol too,they had a bit of a higher heel with natural leather colour soles and heels ( i hope that makes sense ).BTW you once mentioned the Long Cross pub in Lawrence Weston,i went past there on  friday and its shut down i think that it was the last pub down there,i can remember when there was five pubs in that area how times have changed.

Yes, what I was calling stacks were the natural leather soles and heels that cerneabbas describes and which looked "layered"
post #14149 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post

So that's what Solatios looked like. I think they're mentioned in Robert Elms' "The Way We Wore" and I came across references to them when looking up Royals on the internet some time ago. Quite a lot about them on a Liverpool-oriented forum that was linked on a post here a little while ago.

I know its been mentioned but Solatio was a make of shoe who'd been making shoes long before then, in many styles.
However, about the time of the style in question, some people would refer to them as "Solatios" or "Slattios" (in the same way a vacuum cleaner was often called a Hoover).
Mind you, many called the basket weave loafers 'Solatios' as well (probably as they'd only ever known Solatio make them).
Brideshead mentioned earlier having a pair, late 60s. I must have at least 6 or 7 different styles by them.
The nick-name was very dependent on where you were, how old etc.

Very true.Until I found this Forum I had never heard of Solatios',crossovers or Norwegians but had owned them in the 70's.As I mentioned earlier,the post smooth/pre glam period was a minefield .When I think of myself in a beige two piece suit with Toppers,I keep seeing a mental picture of Max Wall.I just couldn't wait to have the rest of the "Right" gear before I proudly strode out in them.Such was vanity and always wanting to be one step ahead of the pack.There's no doubt about it Royals were (are) very,very special at the time,and have stood the tests of time,but in the vagaries of fashion and style then and since,other things have made the heart beat faster.

Gaziano & Girling has been known to cause palpitations.

post #14150 of 17753

It all in the details they say,and i was thinking of a couple of things the other day regarding knitwear/jumpers.About the time of the scoop neck tank tops,the length of the "Rib" at the waist was getting longer and longer,exagerated up to 8-10".

On 'V' neck Jumpers,it became important to have an overlapp at the point of the 'V'.This was about the same time as the Patchwork jumper style.Silly memories but it kept us on our toes.

The girls were also wearing long sleeve shirts with tight fitting ,fine ribbed short sleeve crew necks.This made the sleeves look quite puffy.

post #14151 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

 

http://www.solatio.co.uk/ To think we replaced Smooths and Brogues with these monstrosities and there back ??

I understand to a point your comment but equally you could say the same about many thing as we move forward,Also you have to consider how they were worn and complemented the "Whole Look".While I cringe at the gargantuan lapels of my later suit jackets,I was very comfortable with the whole ensemble.........at the time.

post #14152 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by papyloic View Post

and an other one from my collection... from the same set..

Interesting picture,can anyone read the names on the poster ? i think Manchester City on the right.Nottingham Forest on the left ?.

post #14153 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Interesting picture,can anyone read the names on the poster ? i think Manchester City on the right.Nottingham Forest on the left ?.
Looks it to me.

post #14154 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

I cannot think of anything from the 70s after the suedehead period that i would want to wear today,it was bad enough wearing it then.I just dont understand why the skinhead/suedehead look lasted such a short time,or why what followed lasted so long.If you look at that picture ek77 put up of the North Sheilds lads and then watch the Millwall Panorama programme you will see the same basic long haired,baggy trousers look..the picture was 5 years before the programme.I know that clothes and shoes changed over those 5 years but the ( awful ) look remained the same,remember the thick zip up cardigans ? ( winter 75 ) or the longer starsky and hutch ones ?.By 76 i had had enough and began buying what I wanted more than what was in fashion,i even started wearing loafers,a camel coloured crombie and a few other suedehead style clothes ( not all at once ) and since then i have often worn similar clothes and shoes,but again not all at the same time.

Check out Bobby the Wolf on the panorama doc with his soul boy barnet , shades and polo neck very south london tout look .

post #14155 of 17753

Two of the young lads, the same day.

Like the jacket-scarf-jean combo (well you can see the jean on the other pic posted by papyloic). And the crombie/jean combo too.

Roytonboy refers to the jean/jacket association in his recent post "Notthingam forest". Became a classic. But you must find an apropriate jacket to match the jean...


Edited by Clouseau - 8/6/13 at 1:52pm
post #14156 of 17753
Eccles is 62 now i believe. As i mentioned he must be at leat 60 now and he said plus a couple. Still loves Chelsea and when i mentioned that hes a bit of a legend on skinhead forums he said he was a Skinhead for no more than 2 years.
He also said he still gets harrassed by the OB at SB.
post #14157 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post

Gill and Del Evans, Birmingham Mods at Torquay in 1966 (from their Mod Togs page on Facebook).  Del is wearing what Gill describes as Italian shoes that may well be early Solatios - Del can't recall the make unfortunately.

Apart from the shoes the other thing I love about this photo is that it reminds us of the reluctance to dress-down even on holiday.




Excellent picture Mr.Knightley.Captures the period of time exactly.smile.gif
post #14158 of 17753


Still on footwear but a bit behind the discussion about "baseball boots" - has this photo been on here before? See lad on scooter on left. Looks genuine early/mid-60s shot to me. Caption says 1 Jan 1964: "a group of mods posing on their scooters outside The Scene club in Soho, London, circa 1964".
post #14159 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

roytonboy.Another great post from you,it was interesting to read about how the Forest fans had organised themselves,as you say they probably had more success against lesser numbers.I was also interested in what you said about Forests greasers,at Rovers we had greasers too ( and skinheads of course ) they seemed to come together for a "common cause" whilst i only remember  Bristol City having skinheads.There were always stories about people being chucked in the Trent by Forest fans,or having their sheepskins/martens stolen at Liverpool another story that went the rounds was the "ammonia girls" at Chelsea...there must be some truth in some of those stories but how much i dont know.

 

cerneabbas, you are a bad influence!!  (This is absolutely, positively the last of these stories I'm going to post- they must be of no interest to the vast majority of people on this site)

 

 

Liverpool (a) 1972

 

“Something happens to everyone who goes there!” warned Steven Howe.  And it was true – those wackers would not only give you a good hiding, but pinch some of your clothes too! One of the Royton lads had been done at Anfield when visiting with United, Not only had they had his Harrington but they wanted his Doc Martens too, They lost interest when he told them they were size 6 (he lied). Well, City were top of the league and hot favourites to win the Championship and we were going to go, Scousers or no Scousers. We decided to be sensible and not wear anything that would distinguish us as Blues, we would keep our mouths shut on the streets and hope to get away with it.

Towards the end of that season we were taken to a few matches by car, driven by Andy Cavanagh’s Mum and her friend, Anne. What an odd sight that must have been, two middle-aged women with 3 denim-clad youths in the back of the car!  Anyway, on this occasion Terry (Cocking) couldn't come so it was just Andy and I. We reckoned that the car would be the safest bet. We were 17 by this time and much of the niaivity  of our younger days had diminished. At 14 and 15 we couldn’t wait to be one of the ‘big timers’, in amongst it, by 17 we were a bit more street wise and knew we had to have our wits about us. Madge and Anne had arranged to meet some blokes they worked with in a pub and intended to watch the game from the Kop (!?!) – we would go to the Anfield Road end. It was packed (50,000+) and to my surprise loads of scousers behind the goal at ‘our’ end. It was jammed so full that we couldn't even get to the rest of the City fans, who were pushed to one side of the terrace. The match was crap  - we lost 3-0 – and as the third went in we decided to leave to get an early dash back to the car. In one of those ‘happy’ coincidences Everton were also at home, in the cup, that day. In order to avoid congestion they had kicked of 15 minutes early, our match 15 minutes late. Yes, giving just enough time for all the Everton fans to get up to Anfield for a spot of ‘Manc’ bashing! As we left the stadium there were a gang of blue scouse leaning on the wall across the road. We walked a few steps further before noticing some City fans getting kicked to bits by a wall further up the street, two local bobbies quite literally ‘looking the other way’. We decided to go back into the stadium, and turned, but too late – the Everton fans had sussed us (not difficult really) and followed us up the street. They stood between us and the entrance. We ran through them – I would like to have said we gave as good as we got, but nowhere near and Andy got the worst of it – and up the steps back onto the crowded terracing, pushing and kicking our way through the mass, trying to get lost in the crowd. When we had got well into the throng we stopped so as not to draw any more attention to ourselves - I don’t think I’d ever been as scared in my life. When the final whistle went we left with the masses and entered the stand on the side and walked along underneath that until we came out at the Kop exit. Trying to look happy (the home team had won 3-0) we hoped to blend in and make our way back to the car. (Bravado be damned - this was purely about survival!) Now, when you see a fight by a football ground it’s most often a quick scuffle and people usually shout abuse or pretend not to notice. Not in Liverpool! We passed another couple of fights, loads of people of all ages stood around shouting encouragement as if they were ringside! One was taking place on a Zebra crossing with a crowd gathered around, even across the road and I can remember the baleasher beacon post going ‘ding’ as someone crashed into it. We didn’t stop and were so grateful to see the inside of that car.

 

 

Sadly, Andy died, aged 44, some years ago, following a heart attack. Though I hadn’t seen him for over 25 years I was still very sad to hear the news. So many memories……..  

post #14160 of 17753
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

roytonboy.Another great post from you,it was interesting to read about how the Forest fans had organised themselves,as you say they probably had more success against lesser numbers.I was also interested in what you said about Forests greasers,at Rovers we had greasers too ( and skinheads of course ) they seemed to come together for a "common cause" whilst i only remember  Bristol City having skinheads.There were always stories about people being chucked in the Trent by Forest fans,or having their sheepskins/martens stolen at Liverpool another story that went the rounds was the "ammonia girls" at Chelsea...there must be some truth in some of those stories but how much i dont know.

 

cerneabbas - my apologies, I know very little about Bristol. Is support for the two clubs divided along geographical lines?

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