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post #13726 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post

I tended to not wear steel DMs as they were too cumbersome but lads who did when the steel began to show through the toecap they would be relegated to work wear only.  Greasers tended to like having the steel showing through the toecap but this was on heavy black industrial boots - they did not wear DMs


The steel toed work boots - I meant ones with the steel on the outside ....[/quote]


From `68/`70,never saw anybody with exposed toecaps on Boot.Maybe on the Sites but never around the Street.
post #13727 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Dandelion & Burdock,Draught Sherry,Scrumpy,Lager & Lime.

A bottle of Asprin

The End.

Sorry Botolph....

 

Dandelion & Burdock (Corona- Delivered every week to the house),Draught Sherry (Nameless,cheap and poisonous in volume) Scrumpy (Thatchers iiRC?) Lager (never used to order by name in those days,just Lager and Lime and get the cheapest )

 

Nowadays it's Appleton & Coke when I can find it in a bar.Daily tipple now is usually a Nero D'avola or Rioja......Nuit St Georges if I am feeling flush.

post #13728 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerneabbas View Post

Botolph. I enjoyed the post where you mentioned the ice hockey related "trouble",i had not realised that this happened..and you went up to Canada to "take it to them " fair play to you. Yes you do and you should grow out of this as i did with the football thing,however you still see some old nutter getting arrested in his 50s at football matches ! ( what do their children think about it ? ) age with dignity i say.I meant to put up a post about the Robinsons brogues that you posted pictures of,i was reading about them and they are made in Northampton ! the guy from Robinsons didnt say who makes them but he said not Cheaney,i thought it was strange because if someone can make nice longwings for Robinsons why not make and sell them under their own brand ?

 

 

 

  Yeah the only real 'football' related bother here seems to be "trying too hard to emulate the skinheads and casuals or ultras"... Hockey is more of a home-grown hooligan sport here.  Granted there aren't to my knowledge any serious firms or anything having to do with it.  In the '70s we had the "Gallery Gods" at the Boston Garden but nothing like your Bushwhackers, ICF, Treatment, ASC, etc.  It was fun while it lasted, but approaching 40 years old I don't go looking for trouble!  Hahaha.

 

 

  That's funny about Robinson's brogues, I wonder who the maker is... I have  pairs from a few of the other major Northampton companies and the Robinson's seem bulletproof in comparison to many others.  Granted I like the shape of say, Loake, just a bit better but them Robinson's could survive a 3rd World War!

post #13729 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Sorry Botolph....

 

Dandelion & Burdock (Corona- Delivered every week to the house),Draught Sherry (Nameless,cheap and poisonous in volume) Scrumpy (Thatchers iiRC?) Lager (never used to order by name in those days,just Lager and Lime and get the cheapest )

 

Nowadays it's Appleton & Coke when I can find it in a bar.Daily tipple now is usually a Nero D'avola or Rioja......Nuit St Georges if I am feeling flush.

 

 

 

  No probs fella... just thought discussing such things might jog the old memory banks, go off on an as-unmentioned tangent.  Hit and miss!

I was thinking this after initially reading your mention of draught sherry-- what a deadly thing that must have been what with no regulation in bars as to taps and lines staying clean, and all that bacteria...bleccchh... The hangovers must have been exquisite.

  When I'm in the UK I'll definitely still order "lager" "stout", or "ale" if in a proper public house.  Probably a dying thing with all the old pubs going the way of the dodo and the new kit bars taking over.   

post #13730 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aces and Eights View Post

 

Light and bitter at 2 shillings and sixpence (half a crown) a pint was the norm.  Some lads drank Brown Ale as it was sweeter.  The girls would drink half a cider or half Harp Lager that was just becoming popular in 69.  On Saturday nights your girl would be treated to Rum & Black.  This was not a popular drink with the blokes as if it got spilt on your clothes the blackcurrant stain would not come out.

 

In those days people did not go Dutch ie girls buying their share of drinks.  We were very chivalrous back then and it was a pride thing to be able to buy your girls drinks and cigarettes

 

I think in late 69 / early 70 on of the older lads in our gang came in the pub and ordered a pint of Harp lager and lime which was unheard of for a bloke to drink and cost the extortionate price of 4 shillings.  He was on much bigger wages than a lot of us and was also a trendsetter.  It wasn't long before we were all changing to pints of lager with old boys in flat caps tutting and assuming we must have tuned gay to give up traditional beer.  Another year and the lime was dropped

 

Girls also liked Pernod with the believe that if you drank water in the morning after you would get drunk again !

 

If you went out for a meal Blue Nun or Mateus was the choice of the day mainly because we did not know anything else

 

It was quite normal to enter and be served in pubs at 15 with no checking of age or ID.  If you looked 18 ish you were in.

 

Of course pubs were so different then - they were mainly Landlord and not any managers so the Landlord would keep his pub decent as the more turnover he took - the more profit he made for himself.  a typical landlord would have a jag on the forecourt and would be client side of the saloon bar on a  Friday and Saturday night somking a big cigar and you wanted hem to call you bay name to impress your girl and mates to show that you were accepted.

 

With no mobile phones / email back then the pub was your meeting point and everything happened from there.  So if you arranged to meet at 8 pm on a Monday night - that was it - no changes - you very rarely rang your mates house because house phones were still not the norm and if you did have one your parents would not let you use it or wanted incoming calls from your mates.

 

How times have changed


Good post mate, i've mentioned the brown/light splits that the old man drank, i could never work out why he/you did this, he explained that

bitter was cheap but due to the crap way it was brewed tasted like rats piss, ale on the other was more expensive and tasted better, so by

splitting the pint you had a reasonable drink that didn't cost the earth.

 

Larger, his opinions from the 50/60's, served in half pint glasses drank by the lady's and expensive, blokes didn't drink it and if they did, they were looked upon as benders

post #13731 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Sorry Botolph....

 

Dandelion & Burdock (Corona- Delivered every week to the house),Draught Sherry (Nameless,cheap and poisonous in volume) Scrumpy (Thatchers iiRC?) Lager (never used to order by name in those days,just Lager and Lime and get the cheapest )

 

Nowadays it's Appleton & Coke when I can find it in a bar.Daily tipple now is usually a Nero D'avola or Rioja......Nuit St Georges if I am feeling flush.

Draught Sherry, NEVER again for me, once bitten....

post #13732 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post


straight from the squire shop. ha ha


I had a duffel coat, Gloverall bottle green, post skinhead in 1972. I bought a brown one in 1975. Never thought of them as skinhead or suedehead and was surprised when they featured in 'The Ivy Look'. quote  'the pea coat and the duffle coat are the ultimate signifiers of the Ivy look in cold weather'.  I still  have a liking for them and there is still a factory in London making them. In winter they are an option. However. my missus refuses to allow me to buy one because she worries I might end up looking like Uncle Albert in 'Only fools and horses'

post #13733 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post

I tended to not wear steel DMs as they were too cumbersome but lads who did when the steel began to show through the toecap they would be relegated to work wear only.  Greasers tended to like having the steel showing through the toecap but this was on heavy black industrial boots - they did not wear DMs



[/quote]
The steel toed work boots - I meant ones with the steel on the outside ....


I've spoken to several flat roofers/ashphelters over the years who wont wear anything other than this type of steel toecap

post #13734 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aces and Eights View Post

 

Light and bitter at 2 shillings and sixpence (half a crown) a pint was the norm.  Some lads drank Brown Ale as it was sweeter.  The girls would drink half a cider or half Harp Lager that was just becoming popular in 69.  On Saturday nights your girl would be treated to Rum & Black.  This was not a popular drink with the blokes as if it got spilt on your clothes the blackcurrant stain would not come out.

 

In those days people did not go Dutch ie girls buying their share of drinks.  We were very chivalrous back then and it was a pride thing to be able to buy your girls drinks and cigarettes

 

I think in late 69 / early 70 on of the older lads in our gang came in the pub and ordered a pint of Harp lager and lime which was unheard of for a bloke to drink and cost the extortionate price of 4 shillings.  He was on much bigger wages than a lot of us and was also a trendsetter.  It wasn't long before we were all changing to pints of lager with old boys in flat caps tutting and assuming we must have tuned gay to give up traditional beer.  Another year and the lime was dropped

 

Girls also liked Pernod with the believe that if you drank water in the morning after you would get drunk again !

 

If you went out for a meal Blue Nun or Mateus was the choice of the day mainly because we did not know anything else

 

It was quite normal to enter and be served in pubs at 15 with no checking of age or ID.  If you looked 18 ish you were in.

 

Of course pubs were so different then - they were mainly Landlord and not any managers so the Landlord would keep his pub decent as the more turnover he took - the more profit he made for himself.  a typical landlord would have a jag on the forecourt and would be client side of the saloon bar on a  Friday and Saturday night somking a big cigar and you wanted hem to call you bay name to impress your girl and mates to show that you were accepted.

 

With no mobile phones / email back then the pub was your meeting point and everything happened from there.  So if you arranged to meet at 8 pm on a Monday night - that was it - no changes - you very rarely rang your mates house because house phones were still not the norm and if you did have one your parents would not let you use it or wanted incoming calls from your mates.

 

How times have changed


I could have written this (if my memory was as good). Just to add that we sometimes drank Rum and Black when we had the money. Drambue was another drink when we were flush. We also drank Pernod with plenty of ice to make it cloudy. We started to drink Lager (much to the disgust of older men) and Stella was the most expensive so we had that. One mate always wanted Lime in his Stella which used to wind us up because it ruined the taste and we thought he should have a cheaper lager with lime. Skol was a cheap alternative. At 15 I was a pub regular.

post #13735 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post


I was merely an eye-twinkle in the '60-70 season so sadly couldn't attend due to height restrictions.
There are many things I will never know about the time - that's why I waiting for you lot to tell me some more stories!

What about them american college cardies with the sleeve stripes?
What about painting / polishing the toe caps on your exposed steel work boots?
What about watches - cool accessory on your xmas list or not worth bothering with when there's sheepskins to save up for?
St Christophers? ID bracelets - engraved? short lived?

You seem to have most of that period sussed IMO.

American college cardies-Don't remember them.

Steel toe caps- Only for building site workers and the young guys were wearing worn out DM's.

Watches- Timex was a popular Christmas or Birthday gift. I had an imitation divers watch.

St Christophers- I had one in about 1972.

ID Bracelet- I had one 1966 with my christian name badly engraved on the face plate. By 1969 no one had them.

post #13736 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger View Post


I had a duffel coat, Gloverall bottle green, post skinhead in 1972. I bought a brown one in 1975. Never thought of them as skinhead or suedehead and was surprised when they featured in 'The Ivy Look'. quote  'the pea coat and the duffle coat are the ultimate signifiers of the Ivy look in cold weather'.  I still  have a liking for them and there is still a factory in London making them. In winter they are an option. However. my missus refuses to allow me to buy one because she worries I might end up looking like Uncle Albert in 'Only fools and horses'

Indeed Uncle Albert.Laughin like a loon.

post #13737 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basset View Post


Good post mate, i've mentioned the brown/light splits that the old man drank, i could never work out why he/you did this, he explained that

bitter was cheap but due to the crap way it was brewed tasted like rats piss, ale on the other was more expensive and tasted better, so by

splitting the pint you had a reasonable drink that didn't cost the earth.

 

Larger, his opinions from the 50/60's, served in half pint glasses drank by the lady's and expensive, blokes didn't drink it and if they did, they were looked upon as benders

Interesting tid bit I never knew that was that was the reason, so the old man would have mixed a pale ale with a mild ale? because he didn't like the taste of a pale ale?,bars will traditionally use a guinness and a harp for a half and half here in the states which would be using the irish definition or you can order a black and tan which is the guinness with a bass, so its either a irish dry stout with a pale ale or an irish dry stout with a pale lager, I don't know why its done in the states none of the brands are really the worst of the worst that they usually use, if someone were doing it for that purpose in the states they would use something more like a a mixture of a good american pale ale with an american adjunct lager or something to that effect but its rarely done as far as I know, I once mixed the rest of my stella with some bottom of the barrel busch and I couldn't finish it.

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob the Badger
 
I could have written this (if my memory was as good). Just to add that we sometimes drank Rum and Black when we had the money. Drambue was another drink when we were flush. We also drank Pernod with plenty of ice to make it cloudy. We started to drink Lager (much to the disgust of older men) and Stella was the most expensive so we had that. One mate always wanted Lime in his Stella which used to wind us up because it ruined the taste and we thought he should have a cheaper lager with lime. Skol was a cheap alternative. At 15 I was a pub regular.
 

 

Why were the old men against lagers and pale lagers was it due to perceived strength of alcohol content or something else?
post #13738 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post



Here I am  in those carefree, happy-go-lucky days.   




                

Yep, I can tell that's you! smile.gif
post #13739 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Has this ever been posted?

http://youtu.be/JQ9_0ybmPeI

0:33 the bloke with the bar billiards cue is Jeremy Bulloch. He was a former child actor - I'm sure he played TV's original 'Just William' before Dennis Waterman.

Loads of other recognisable faces, but I can't put names to them.
post #13740 of 18906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post

M-U... MUF... MUFC - OK!

"Let's Go" - recorded in the 1960s by The Ventures (but I don't think that was the original). I've mentioned before that this track was the origin of the football terrace clapping chant.

I also think I mentioned that Steve Maxted used to play it at the Savoy Rooms in Catford, and all the Millwall supporters would join in.

Clap, clap, clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap-clap, "Millwall!"
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