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post #13636 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post

It wasn't a new idea even then. Here's a pic of two US Marines in 1944.



Someone else much remembered from the 1960s was wrestler Billy Two Rivers, who might have influenced your rival mob.


My Mum loved "Billy Two Rivers"-every time he did his dance-she would do the Indian noises.Some of the things you remember when you are getting older!!!!! smile.gif
post #13637 of 19331
Man of Mystery. We were talking about Billy Two Rivers ( and other wrestlers of that time ) in work today.I am not trying to be a smartass here,but the picture you put up saying US marines is one of the pictures that Clouseau mentioned of US paratroops, 101st airborne division the "screaming eagles"...i think that at least one of them is a native American.Did you ever see anyone with a mohican 69/70 ?
post #13638 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post

What has not been touched on(with us older exSkinheads)is the Polo neck Jumper.Whilst the younger ones were wearing patch-work Jumpers etc.,the older ones wore these in many colours and patterns.They were smart enough(if thin)to wear with Jackets,Trousers and Suits.The thicker ones could be worn with Jeans or Trousers.I had about 5 thin ones(various colours) and 2 thicker ones.If you look at Pictures of that time, one if not more would be wearing a Polo neck Jumper.

Also, crew neck lambswool pullovers, just before this.

 

I would give a time line for knitwear as:

 

1968 - plain v-neck sleeveless pullover

1969 - as above with the addition of v-neck fair-isle pullover. This was the first item of clothing I bought specifically for my 'skinhead' wardrobe. (I already had boots, Levi's, BD shirts before I  ever heard the term 'skinhead')

1970 - plain sleeveless pullovers - fair-isle fading out as checked shirts came in.

1971 - plain long sleeved v-neck pullovers. Late 1971 - also crew neck lambswool pullovers

1972 - Early 1972 Polo neck jumper.

 

Obviously the usual disclaimer re: location and timings and naturally some cross-over in styles (e.g. I still wore sleeveless pullovers in 1971 as well as long sleeved ones)

 

Late 1972 - Football Jumpers (although they were zip up cardigans) and 'patchwork' jumpers (were these also known as 'Jester' jumpers?). I would describe these as "terrace wear" for although there was still a football terrace culture it had little to do with skinhead or suedehead (or Mod) style by this stage. I had a mate who was 12-18 months younger than me who had been a smartly turned out suedehead but who was later to be seen wearing loafers, checked rupert trousers and a patchwork jumper over a penny round collared shirt. He was most put out when he heard an old woman say "It's Joseph and his coat of many colours!" - Ah, fashion, but no style!

post #13639 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post

AppleMark


This pic was on modculture some time ago (can't see it there now) and it purports to show two mods - rather scruffy ones I'd say - wearing Adidas and Hush Puppies in the mid 1960s.  I have no idea if it is genuine.

Mr.Knightley,interesting Photo.The car in the background looks like a Riley Elf-one of the answers to the popular Mini.The Mark2 came out in `64,the Mk.3 came out in in `69.Another interesting aspect is the other Scooter rider with(looking from this direction)"College Stripes" on his sleeves.
post #13640 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

Also, crew neck lambswool pullovers, just before this.

I would give a time line for knitwear as:

1968 - plain v-neck sleeveless pullover
1969 - as above with the addition of v-neck fair-isle pullover. This was the first item of clothing I bought specifically for my 'skinhead' wardrobe. (I already had boots, Levi's, BD shirts before I  ever heard the term 'skinhead')
1970 - plain sleeveless pullovers - fair-isle fading out as checked shirts came in.
1971 - plain long sleeved v-neck pullovers. Late 1971 - also crew neck lambswool pullovers
1972 - Early 1972 Polo neck jumper.

Obviously the usual disclaimer re: location and timings and naturally some cross-over in styles (e.g. I still wore sleeveless pullovers in 1971 as well as long sleeved ones)

Late 1972 - Football Jumpers (although they were zip up cardigans) and 'patchwork' jumpers (were these also known as 'Jester' jumpers?). I would describe these as "terrace wear" for although there was still a football terrace culture it had little to do with skinhead or suedehead (or Mod) style by this stage. I had a mate who was 12-18 months younger than me who had been a smartly turned out suedehead but who was later to be seen wearing loafers, checked rupert trousers and a patchwork jumper over a penny round collared shirt. He was most put out when he heard an old woman say "It's Joseph and his coat of many colours!" - Ah, fashion, but no style!

Interesting List.Crew Neck Jumpers were worn around `66/`67 as well-following on from the Mod.

I know what you mean Ed.The ones that stand out in my mind was the `71ish "Ribbed" Polo Necks.These came in an assortment of Colours.
post #13641 of 19331
Mr. Knightley's very interesting post about dressing in the Age of Nudity and the whole topic of shorts, plus cerneabbas' comments about politicians' dressing down seem to be focused in this Daily Telegraph article (tried to link but couldn't make it work, so hope this cut & paste does):

Get shorty at work, but make sure you have the legs for it

As temperatures rise, Glenda Cooper asks whether it is ever acceptable for men to wear shorts in the office



Frankie Morello's short suits, left and right, at Milan fashion week; the Labour MP Ben Bradshaw in cycling shorts, shirt and formal shoes (Getty/James Eisen)

FOR many red-faced commuters making their way to the office today in near-90 degree heat, there is a pressing question: is it possible for the (male) office worker to keep his cool and his dignity? In short – can he wear shorts?
With dress codes at many businesses having relaxed over the past decade, and the short suit now part of many women’s office wardrobe, such a suggestion – once unthinkable – no longer seems so outré, as the heatwave is predicted to hit 89.6F (32C) on Wednesday.
At Milan fashion week this month, designers showcased city shorts. And even the stuffy world of politics is not immune. Last week, the Labour MP Ben Bradshaw turned up in cycling shorts for a reception to bid farewell to David Miliband, the former foreign secretary.
But Jodi R R Smith, president of the US etiquette consultants Mannersmith, urges caution. “Let’s be honest, very few men have the right legs for the office,” she observes. But for those who feel they do, she adds: “First, you must know your office environment. If it’s formal or very conservative, then no. If it is more casual then I would go as far as maybe. The safe option though is thin linen trousers – save the shorts for a day at the beach.”
For those determined to indulge, cycling shorts like Mr Bradshaw’s would still be seen as unacceptable in most offices – along with hotpants, denim and boardshorts. But even with tailored shorts the dilemma continues – wear socks and shoes and risk being mistaken for Just William? Or sandals and risk widespread revulsion unless you’ve spent a fortune on pedicures?
Some tailors already make bespoke shorts for businessmen. Steven Hitchcock, of the Savile Row Tailor, said: “We generally tend to make them in linen. I have had a couple of people who said that they want them for the City, but they are mainly for people who are in hotter climates.”
They are not yet a common sight in Britain’s business world, but even in the smart world of the City, the fashion choice is not banned. Shorts are not mentioned in the Bank of England’s dress code, which states that people need to be “neat and businesslike”.
And a Pricewaterhouse Coopers spokesman said it did not have a “no shorts” policy but added: “We do not expect to see droves of staff arriving in shorts, but if someone came to work in a short suit that was appropriate for big clients and the office then it would not be a problem.”
So don’t write off the rise of the trouser hemline yet. Last month, when train drivers in Stockholm were told they could not wear shorts because the operator Arriva’s dress code only permitted trousers or skirts, around a dozen male drivers turned up in skirts.
post #13642 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post

Mr. Knightley's very interesting post about dressing in the Age of Nudity and the whole topic of shorts, plus cerneabbas' comments about politicians' dressing down seem to be focused in this Daily Telegraph article (tried to link but couldn't make it work, so hope this cut & paste does):

Get shorty at work, but make sure you have the legs for it

As temperatures rise, Glenda Cooper asks whether it is ever acceptable for men to wear shorts in the office



Frankie Morello's short suits, left and right, at Milan fashion week; the Labour MP Ben Bradshaw in cycling shorts, shirt and formal shoes (Getty/James Eisen)

FOR many red-faced commuters making their way to the office today in near-90 degree heat, there is a pressing question: is it possible for the (male) office worker to keep his cool and his dignity? In short – can he wear shorts?
With dress codes at many businesses having relaxed over the past decade, and the short suit now part of many women’s office wardrobe, such a suggestion – once unthinkable – no longer seems so outré, as the heatwave is predicted to hit 89.6F (32C) on Wednesday.
At Milan fashion week this month, designers showcased city shorts. And even the stuffy world of politics is not immune. Last week, the Labour MP Ben Bradshaw turned up in cycling shorts for a reception to bid farewell to David Miliband, the former foreign secretary.
But Jodi R R Smith, president of the US etiquette consultants Mannersmith, urges caution. “Let’s be honest, very few men have the right legs for the office,” she observes. But for those who feel they do, she adds: “First, you must know your office environment. If it’s formal or very conservative, then no. If it is more casual then I would go as far as maybe. The safe option though is thin linen trousers – save the shorts for a day at the beach.”
For those determined to indulge, cycling shorts like Mr Bradshaw’s would still be seen as unacceptable in most offices – along with hotpants, denim and boardshorts. But even with tailored shorts the dilemma continues – wear socks and shoes and risk being mistaken for Just William? Or sandals and risk widespread revulsion unless you’ve spent a fortune on pedicures?
Some tailors already make bespoke shorts for businessmen. Steven Hitchcock, of the Savile Row Tailor, said: “We generally tend to make them in linen. I have had a couple of people who said that they want them for the City, but they are mainly for people who are in hotter climates.”
They are not yet a common sight in Britain’s business world, but even in the smart world of the City, the fashion choice is not banned. Shorts are not mentioned in the Bank of England’s dress code, which states that people need to be “neat and businesslike”.
And a Pricewaterhouse Coopers spokesman said it did not have a “no shorts” policy but added: “We do not expect to see droves of staff arriving in shorts, but if someone came to work in a short suit that was appropriate for big clients and the office then it would not be a problem.”
So don’t write off the rise of the trouser hemline yet. Last month, when train drivers in Stockholm were told they could not wear shorts because the operator Arriva’s dress code only permitted trousers or skirts, around a dozen male drivers turned up in skirts.

Hmmm ... Photos didn't copy over - you'll have to Google Ben Bradshaw MP
post #13643 of 19331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Knightley View Post

AppleMark


This pic was on modculture some time ago (can't see it there now) and it purports to show two mods - rather scruffy ones I'd say - wearing Adidas and Hush Puppies in the mid 1960s.  I have no idea if it is genuine.


Great photo, apparently Adidas made bowling shoes in the 60s, maybe that's what the lad is wearing.*

Not relevant at all, but made me smile -



Another medal, Muttley? biggrin.gif

*EDIT No it isn't, they haven't got a heel.
post #13644 of 19331
bunty.Great picture...you say not relevant but the sports bag proves that Mods new about Adidas at least .Is wearing medals that you are not entitled to an offence ?,i think that you are allowed to wear your relatives medals not sure but i bet there are rules about it.
post #13645 of 19331
elwood.Interesting article just shows that we have got our fingers on the pulse on here.i have two questions,what sort of bloke turns up to work wearing cycling shorts ? ( except Bradley Wiggins ) and who would vote for that bloke ?.
post #13646 of 19331
MoM. Great pic of the US paratroopers. "Mille chemises" sounds familiar. i think my older brother had shirts of that brand in the seventies. i even think they had a shop in Paris, but it disappeared. there is today a website with that name but it has no relation.

Mr Knightley. Very difficult to date this picture. On the Weston website where they used this photo as a model for a drawing, they say that Minets wore their emblematic mocassin since 1962. But it is true that the haircuts look more mid-sixties. I would say this picture was shot between 1962 and 1966. So 1963 is possible as Mr Chenoune seems to be an authority in the field of history of fashion.

And that was an interesting Link, Mr Knightley. The influence on French style from the "Incroyables" (eccentric Dandys) and the "Merveilleuses" (with their semi transparent dresses) has been very important, at the end of the Revolution. Stanley Kubrick seemed to use an English "Dickensian" version of "Incroyable" style for Alex costume in the Chelsea Drugstore (by the way the inside of this location is very similar to the Inside of the Drugstores of the Champs elysees and Boulevard Saint Germain in the seventies ) scene of Clockwork orange, where Alex pulls two girls. "Incroyables" always carried sticks, for style, and as weapons.

Maybe this will bring memories to the originals from London :
casualcoblog.blogspot.jp/2010/01/at-chelsea-drugstore.html
Edited by Clouseau - 7/16/13 at 7:17am
post #13647 of 19331
Adidas made all kinds of sports shoes in the 60s but I don't know what they are.
Not really my thing so I asked a couple of Adidas officionardos and they didn't know.
So I had a hunt around and they're not Italias or ROMs (both available in '60). Look a bit like the Adidas Perfekt but the soles are too thin. Must be a very specific shoe for something requiring a very thin sole (i.e. low impact, something like tight-rope walking!)
Software: Microsoft Office
[IMG ALT=""]http://www.styleforum.net/content/type/61/id/886691/width/350/he (the b/w pic is the yanks picking up a few medals at the 1960 Olympics in Rome.ight/700[/IMG]
The advert if from 1968.

Anyway, the make's fairly irrelevant but there was a desire by some to wear expensive sports shoes (like what Dopeman was saying earlier).

More importantly, what kudos did such a choice have by '67, '68, '69?
How cool was it to wear exclusive sports shoes by that time (if at all)?
Were green flash and the likes a cheap shoe you didn't mind going on the beach in or kicking a ball around, rether than messing up your shiny leather?
Were the older lads wearing them as a fashion item? Or were they too cheap and not grown up enough?
post #13648 of 19331
oops, made a mess of that.
You get my point though!

post #13649 of 19331

Anyone else know about Mods wearing Italian Bowling shoes?Am I wrong about this(I've seen pics of Keith Moon wearing them mid 60's)

post #13650 of 19331
I was talking to the bloke i work with yesterday about white plimsolls,he is 60 now and from London ( Fulham),he said that him and his mates wore Dunlop plimsolls mid to late 60s they were influenced by the tv show " I Spy".He has told me before that they wanted an American look and would save up and buy American button downs instead of Ben Shermans,he had a yellow harrington.We also talked about boat/deck shoes,he always wears them in the hot weather and says that they should not be worn with socks,and that linen shirts should not be tucked into trousers.
Edited by cerneabbas - 7/15/13 at 9:36pm
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