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post #12766 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankmod View Post

Looking at the Vintage Shirts on ebay.The most expensive at 125 us dollars is this Brutus.baldy[1].gif

Pretty crazy I wouldn't even sell a pristine vintage brooks brothers for half that price.

post #12767 of 17758
The longwings do look very similar to the current Florsheim - here are mine: Florsheim 09 photo FlorsheimKenwoodandMS_JSsox09.jpg
post #12768 of 17758

http://www.levi.com/GB/en_GB/men-clothing-pants/p/978110012?productid=978110012&brand=LEVI

This is the first time I have seen something close to the originals in almost 30 years, although there are several imitations from Merc, Jump-the-Gun and Relco in the UK of course.

I wrote the text below three or four years ago.


 

 

---
Permanent press trousers

Alan Birnley: You need a good spanking!
Daphne Birnley: You don’t even know what he’s done.
Alan Birnley: Well apart from costing me £8,000, what has he done?
Daphne Birnley: He’s made a new kind of cloth. It never gets dirty and it lasts forever.

The Man in the White Suit (1951)


Alec Guinness plays the hero of the 1951 Ealing comedy ‘The man in the white suit’. His character, Sidney Stratton, develops an indestructible fabric that never needs cleaning. Afraid that this will spell an end to their businesses, rival mill owners combine forces to prevent the fabric from being produced. 

Unlike her fictional counterpart, the real-life chemist who developed a very similar fabric in the 1960s is credited with saving the US cotton industry from collapse. She was the brains behind Levis Sta-Prest trousers as well as today’s stain-resistant, easy-care and non-iron fabrics. But her story must wait, because there are two parts to the Sta-Prest tale: the cut and the cloth.


Chinos

Like denim, Chino twill cloth is made from cotton. This type of cloth was first made in China (‘chino’ is the Spanish word for Chinese). It was originally used for British and French military uniforms in the mid-19th century.

‘Chino’ is also the name given to a certain style of trousers. The first chinos sold were U.S. Army trousers and unlike today’s chinos, to save fabric during World War II, they had no pleats (that is, they were flat-fronted) and were tapered at the bottom of the leg. 

In the 1950s and ’60s, such trousers became popular with the Ivy-Leagers. Initially chinos were 100% cotton, were easily creased and therefore needed heavy ironing. 


Permanent press

The first modern permanent press (non-iron) process was invented in 1964 by Ruth Rogan Benerito, who worked at the US Department of Agriculture research centre in New Orleans. Her method used methanal (formaldehyde) to cross-link the cellulose molecules in cotton. This made the cotton wrinkle-resistant and allowed cotton fabrics to compete against the new synthetic fibres. Benerito is consequently credited with having saved the US cotton industry in the 1960s.

The same year, Levi Strauss and Co introduced Benerito’s process at its plant in Knoxville, Tennessee. Levis Sta-Prest trousers were therefore some of the first, if not the first, permanent press clothes. They became popular throughout America and were later sold in the UK and adopted by Mods. The first ‘permanent press’ fabrics were prone to staining and the methanal treatment weakened the fibres. This was overcome by incorporating one of the then new synthetic fibres into the weave, such as Terylene, which was developed by ICI in Britain, and licensed to DuPont in the USA as Dacron.

Many other companies subsequently made similar trousers in a wide variety of colours. They became the ‘smart casual’ trousers worn by Mods and the original skinheads. 

Benerito’s basic technique later allowed other valuable properties to be added to cotton, such as stain- and flame-resistance. Today, like the originals, chinos are once more made from 100% cotton. In the 1980s, baggier, pleated chinos became popular, so the cut of most modern chinos is now unlike that of Sta-Prest trousers. 

Levi Strauss and Co subsequently used the Sta-Prest brand name for other items of clothing, including jackets and trousers of very different styles and made from other materials. More recent Levi Strauss jeans with the Sta-Prest name were not the same as the originals, either.

In 1986, more effective methods of making fabrics wrinkle-free were developed, using an alternative to the toxic methanal. The first clothes using this material were sold in 1992. More recently, nanotechnology has been used to make polyester-cotton mixes that are truly stain, sweat and wrinkle proof.



——
• Terylene takes its name from the polyester polyethylene terephthalate (PET) — the stuff that plastic lemonade bottles are made from.


Further reading

The ivy look: An illustrated pocket guide. Classic American clothing by Graham Marsh and JP Gaul (2010) Frances Lincoln Limited. ISBN 978 07112 3138 2.

post #12769 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Watermelon man View Post

http://www.levi.com/GB/en_GB/men-clothing-pants/p/978110012?productid=978110012&brand=LEVI


This is the first time I have seen something close to the originals in almost 30 years, although there are several imitations from Merc, Jump-the-Gun and Relco in the UK of course.


I wrote the text below three or four years ago.




 



 



---

Permanent press trousers


Alan Birnley: You need a good spanking!

Daphne Birnley: You don’t even know what he’s done.

Alan Birnley: Well apart from costing me £8,000, what has he done?

Daphne Birnley: He’s made a new kind of cloth. It never gets dirty and it lasts forever.


The Man in the White Suit (1951)



Alec Guinness plays the hero of the 1951 Ealing comedy ‘The man in the white suit’. His character, Sidney Stratton, develops an indestructible fabric that never needs cleaning. Afraid that this will spell an end to their businesses, rival mill owners combine forces to prevent the fabric from being produced. 


Unlike her fictional counterpart, the real-life chemist who developed a very similar fabric in the 1960s is credited with saving the US cotton industry from collapse. She was the brains behind Levis Sta-Prest trousers as well as today’s stain-resistant, easy-care and non-iron fabrics. But her story must wait, because there are two parts to the Sta-Prest tale: the cut and the cloth.



Chinos


Like denim, Chino twill cloth is made from cotton. This type of cloth was first made in China (‘chino’ is the Spanish word for Chinese). It was originally used for British and French military uniforms in the mid-19th century.


‘Chino’ is also the name given to a certain style of trousers. The first chinos sold were U.S. Army trousers and unlike today’s chinos, to save fabric during World War II, they had no pleats (that is, they were flat-fronted) and were tapered at the bottom of the leg. 


In the 1950s and ’60s, such trousers became popular with the Ivy-Leagers. Initially chinos were 100% cotton, were easily creased and therefore needed heavy ironing. 



Permanent press


The first modern permanent press (non-iron) process was invented in 1964 by Ruth Rogan Benerito, who worked at the US Department of Agriculture research centre in New Orleans. Her method used methanal (formaldehyde) to cross-link the cellulose molecules in cotton. This made the cotton wrinkle-resistant and allowed cotton fabrics to compete against the new synthetic fibres. Benerito is consequently credited with having saved the US cotton industry in the 1960s.


The same year, Levi Strauss and Co introduced Benerito’s process at its plant in Knoxville, Tennessee. Levis Sta-Prest trousers were therefore some of the first, if not the first, permanent press clothes. They became popular throughout America and were later sold in the UK and adopted by Mods. The first ‘permanent press’ fabrics were prone to staining and the methanal treatment weakened the fibres. This was overcome by incorporating one of the then new synthetic fibres into the weave, such as Terylene, which was developed by ICI in Britain, and licensed to DuPont in the USA as Dacron.


Many other companies subsequently made similar trousers in a wide variety of colours. They became the ‘smart casual’ trousers worn by Mods and the original skinheads. 


Benerito’s basic technique later allowed other valuable properties to be added to cotton, such as stain- and flame-resistance. Today, like the originals, chinos are once more made from 100% cotton. In the 1980s, baggier, pleated chinos became popular, so the cut of most modern chinos is now unlike that of Sta-Prest trousers. 


Levi Strauss and Co subsequently used the Sta-Prest brand name for other items of clothing, including jackets and trousers of very different styles and made from other materials. More recent Levi Strauss jeans with the Sta-Prest name were not the same as the originals, either.


In 1986, more effective methods of making fabrics wrinkle-free were developed, using an alternative to the toxic methanal. The first clothes using this material were sold in 1992. More recently, nanotechnology has been used to make polyester-cotton mixes that are truly stain, sweat and wrinkle proof.




——

• Terylene takes its name from the polyester polyethylene terephthalate (PET) — the stuff that plastic lemonade bottles are made from.



Further reading


The ivy look: An illustrated pocket guide. Classic American clothing by Graham Marsh and JP Gaul (2010) Frances Lincoln Limited. ISBN 978 07112 3138 2.



Interesting stuff, Mr Watermelon but I'm hoping you don't mean that's the closest to Levi Sta Press you've seen.
The main differences are the fabric, the cut, pocket detail, waistband, fastener, stitching and colour scheme. If you stand back and squint a bit, they look kind of beige but apart from that......
post #12770 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Watermelon man View Post

http://www.levi.com/GB/en_GB/men-clothing-pants/p/978110012?productid=978110012&brand=LEVI

This is the first time I have seen something close to the originals in almost 30 years, although there are several imitations from Merc, Jump-the-Gun and Relco in the UK of course.

I wrote the text below three or four years ago.


 

 

---
Permanent press trousers

Alan Birnley: You need a good spanking!
Daphne Birnley: You don’t even know what he’s done.
Alan Birnley: Well apart from costing me £8,000, what has he done?
Daphne Birnley: He’s made a new kind of cloth. It never gets dirty and it lasts forever.

The Man in the White Suit (1951)


Alec Guinness plays the hero of the 1951 Ealing comedy ‘The man in the white suit’. His character, Sidney Stratton, develops an indestructible fabric that never needs cleaning. Afraid that this will spell an end to their businesses, rival mill owners combine forces to prevent the fabric from being produced. 

Unlike her fictional counterpart, the real-life chemist who developed a very similar fabric in the 1960s is credited with saving the US cotton industry from collapse. She was the brains behind Levis Sta-Prest trousers as well as today’s stain-resistant, easy-care and non-iron fabrics. But her story must wait, because there are two parts to the Sta-Prest tale: the cut and the cloth.


Chinos

Like denim, Chino twill cloth is made from cotton. This type of cloth was first made in China (‘chino’ is the Spanish word for Chinese). It was originally used for British and French military uniforms in the mid-19th century.

‘Chino’ is also the name given to a certain style of trousers. The first chinos sold were U.S. Army trousers and unlike today’s chinos, to save fabric during World War II, they had no pleats (that is, they were flat-fronted) and were tapered at the bottom of the leg. 

In the 1950s and ’60s, such trousers became popular with the Ivy-Leagers. Initially chinos were 100% cotton, were easily creased and therefore needed heavy ironing. 


Permanent press

The first modern permanent press (non-iron) process was invented in 1964 by Ruth Rogan Benerito, who worked at the US Department of Agriculture research centre in New Orleans. Her method used methanal (formaldehyde) to cross-link the cellulose molecules in cotton. This made the cotton wrinkle-resistant and allowed cotton fabrics to compete against the new synthetic fibres. Benerito is consequently credited with having saved the US cotton industry in the 1960s.

The same year, Levi Strauss and Co introduced Benerito’s process at its plant in Knoxville, Tennessee. Levis Sta-Prest trousers were therefore some of the first, if not the first, permanent press clothes. They became popular throughout America and were later sold in the UK and adopted by Mods. The first ‘permanent press’ fabrics were prone to staining and the methanal treatment weakened the fibres. This was overcome by incorporating one of the then new synthetic fibres into the weave, such as Terylene, which was developed by ICI in Britain, and licensed to DuPont in the USA as Dacron.

Many other companies subsequently made similar trousers in a wide variety of colours. They became the ‘smart casual’ trousers worn by Mods and the original skinheads. 

Benerito’s basic technique later allowed other valuable properties to be added to cotton, such as stain- and flame-resistance. Today, like the originals, chinos are once more made from 100% cotton. In the 1980s, baggier, pleated chinos became popular, so the cut of most modern chinos is now unlike that of Sta-Prest trousers. 

Levi Strauss and Co subsequently used the Sta-Prest brand name for other items of clothing, including jackets and trousers of very different styles and made from other materials. More recent Levi Strauss jeans with the Sta-Prest name were not the same as the originals, either.

In 1986, more effective methods of making fabrics wrinkle-free were developed, using an alternative to the toxic methanal. The first clothes using this material were sold in 1992. More recently, nanotechnology has been used to make polyester-cotton mixes that are truly stain, sweat and wrinkle proof.



——
• Terylene takes its name from the polyester polyethylene terephthalate (PET) — the stuff that plastic lemonade bottles are made from.


Further reading

The ivy look: An illustrated pocket guide. Classic American clothing by Graham Marsh and JP Gaul (2010) Frances Lincoln Limited. ISBN 978 07112 3138 2.


Interesting stuff, as mentioned Levi have stuck the Sta Prest tag on lots of things, think i've got 5/6 pairs of strides with the Sta Pest tag on them, there all different, i think one pair maybe what this thread would call Sta Prest ( if that makes sense ), im not liking the ones in the link they still look like a cross between trousers/jeans, although there slightly better than Levi's last effort with the Sta Prest tag with mods/skins mentioned in the advertising blurb

post #12771 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirryacus View Post

Pretty crazy I wouldn't even sell a pristine vintage brooks brothers for half that price.

They made way more Brooks Brothers shirts at that time than they did Brutus shirts

post #12772 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basset View Post


Interesting stuff, as mentioned Levi have stuck the Sta Prest tag on lots of things, think i've got 5/6 pairs of strides with the Sta Pest tag on them, there all different, i think one pair maybe what this thread would call Sta Prest ( if that makes sense ), im not liking the ones in the link they still look like a cross between trousers/jeans, although there slightly better than Levi's last effort with the Sta Prest tag with mods/skins mentioned in the advertising blurb

I agree. It's a joke making 511 the only format. The market doesn't care about real traditional mods and skins, they only want to cater to the hipsters that like to look "vintagesque." I even ordered a pair of the ones from Stuarts London, the 508 I think. They were alright in the leg but still they had to cut at least 1.5 to 2 inches off the waist? WTF? So basically I would never been able to keep my shirt tucked in and my ass crack would show every time I bend over. This is not my idea of Smart looking at all. Not to mention they say black on the site but really are a charcoal grey. I gave them away.

post #12773 of 17758

Watermelon man.   Great read.Thanks for posting.       Ivyskin89.     You make a good point.           Get the row boat out,pick up Botolph.God speed.

post #12774 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivyskin89 View Post

They made way more Brooks Brothers shirts at that time than they did Brutus shirts

Basically they are asking that kind of money because it is rare not because it is a quality shirt.

post #12775 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttons View Post


Interesting stuff, Mr Watermelon but I'm hoping you don't mean that's the closest to Levi Sta Press you've seen.
The main differences are the fabric, the cut, pocket detail, waistband, fastener, stitching and colour scheme. If you stand back and squint a bit, they look kind of beige but apart from that......

I did indeed mean that. They may well differ in all those ways, but they are still closer than the Relco, JtG, Brooks Bros and Merc 'Sta Prest' of today.

 

As said above, the 'Sta Prest' brand name has been applied to many different styles and items of clothing by Levis, regardless of whether they were made from Sta Prest cloth. The last abominations were 508 jeans under the Sta Prest banner: I think Stuarts still has a few pairs for sale: http://www.stuartslondon.com/trousers-c35/chinos-c38/levi-s-levis-sta-prest-508-black-twill-trouser-97828-0004-p6445

post #12776 of 17758

Seen this ad before?

post #12777 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post



Seen this ad before?

That is the nearest I have seen to the Royal Gibson(unfortunately it does not have the stitching down the front).
post #12778 of 17758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Watermelon man View Post

I did indeed mean that. They may well differ in all those ways, but they are still closer than the Relco, JtG, Brooks Bros and Merc 'Sta Prest' of today.

As said above, the 'Sta Prest' brand name has been applied to many different styles and items of clothing by Levis, regardless of whether they were made from Sta Prest cloth. The last abominations were 508 jeans under the Sta Prest banner: I think Stuarts still has a few pairs for sale: http://www.stuartslondon.com/trousers-c35/chinos-c38/levi-s-levis-sta-prest-508-black-twill-trouser-97828-0004-p6445
It depemds on what yer after. As Mr Basset said, there have been many things tagged as Sta Press over the years - it was one of Levi's trade marks which they pushed heavily. But if it skinhead sta press you're on about (and by that I mean the Never Needs Ironing variety from the late 60s made with the new miracle polyester mixes of the time ... that the skinheads were wearing) then these are a very different trouser. The Straight leg, 17 inch bottom numbers with the concealed catch at the top, button down flap behind the fly to help it sit straight, small belt loops, low rise, slanted front pockets, two back pockets (one with button, one without) was the one readily for sale in '68 -'69, just after (and for a time along side) the frog mouth pocket version and just before the two tone ones (which were slightly different in every way).
Now if you want a pair of them, second hand's your only chance or ask the tailor to copy your old ones (if you can find a decent fabric).
The Merc, JTG etc tend to be cheaply made and more like poor copies of the lesser sta press from the late 60s (of which there were hundreds of brands).

And if you ever expect Levi to be telling the truth that they've made some faithful copies of the old vintage sta press (as with Ben Sherman, LVC, Brutus, Wrangler, Lee etc), do your home work or expect no more of an authentic 60s look than buying a new Vespa GTS.
post #12779 of 17758

As i recall we wore jeans.Levis or Lee.Levis cords.Mohair suit trousers or lightweight off white/stone cotton suit style trousers.I don't remember anyone wearing coloured cotton jeans style trousers?

Maybe i missed the boat on this one,but I personally think the whole sta-press thing has become bigger than it actually was.

post #12780 of 17758
I have never seen anything these days like the old 60s Levi Sta-Prest , I had White , a Stone colour, a beautiful Ice Blue, then they changed the pockets onto the front, this new style had a Sage Green Colour, they also in this new style have a awful Golden Browne colour.
The only Sta Prest Trousers these days I have is a off White Brooks Brothers.
Those pics above are nothing like the old Levi Sta Prest.
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