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Mod to Suedehead - Page 768

post #11506 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post

Did you go to the Seabright or the Norfolk? A good article here on them here  http://www.village-soul.com/page10.htm


Remember going to the first, I think, of the 6TS nights at the Bedford in 79, me and a few of my mates stood out like sore thumbs as we were suedeheads or mods and most were much older and normal. 

Yes I used to go to The Norfolk(both Friday Nights and Saturday-when you had a "Special" on).I am actually named in the Article regarding the Norfolk.Terry is a good Friend of mine,and I still see a lot of the old crowd now.In fact there is another Night in the East End(Horse and Groom,Curtain Road,EC2).It is co-run by my old Partner-in Crime(running Soul Dos)Mark Houghton-Binsy Taylor who is mentioned in the Article,also co runs that night.The Area is buzzing with Soul again.smile.gif
post #11507 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

All the girls in our town had them.Funnily enough they all seemed to loose them around the same time?rotflmao.gif

Couldn't resist that one browniecj !

baldy[1].gif
post #11508 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

     Very Sad.Not a smart one among the lot.

     They certainly they liked their Donkey Jackets in that '78 period didn't they.

God forbid they dress like normal blokes.

post #11509 of 18394

Thanks Tom.Great read.

post #11510 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post


Yes I used to go to The Norfolk(both Friday Nights and Saturday-when you had a "Special" on).I am actually named in the Article regarding the Norfolk.Terry is a good Friend of mine,and I still see a lot of the old crowd now.In fact there is another Night in the East End(Horse and Groom,Curtain Road,EC2).It is co-run by my old Partner-in Crime(running Soul Dos)Mark Houghton-Binsy Taylor who is mentioned in the Article,also co runs that night.The Area is buzzing with Soul again.smile.gif

Soul will never die browniecj.Every generation discovers it and it is re-born and kept alive.

post #11511 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post


Agree Ed, a bit surprising but Dublin Blues connection goes back to early 70s.

The scarf was certainly around in 69; I got one for Christmas that year. Still have it in the loft - well, its replacement after I was "relieved" of it in early 70. I'll try to post that story later.

 

I wore mine to the last home game!

post #11512 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post

Certainly not, I'm a lover, not a fighter. (And have a big yellow line down my spine.) nod[1].gif

'Built for comfort', eh? biggrin.gif
post #11513 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post

I remember reading his Column,in "Blues and Soul" and thinking W.T,F?It seemed to me(in the very early 70s) that People were going backwards in their choice of Music.I remember seeing the Adverts for Va Va`s in Bolton and others(with the Artists Names and Record Titles written around the edge of the Advert).Some of the Records I remembered from listening to Clubs in London-during the mid/late 60s.Not all played Chart Soul,and that was down to the American Servicemen then the laterJamaican Influence.I have one or two Blanks of Soul Records,made in Jamaica,that are not easily recognisable "Soul" Records.Owen Gray,Jackie Edwards and Jackie Opel(to name a few)made good Soul Records-that were heard in Jamaican Clubs.

On the other hand, I can remember that in 1970 onwards I felt that Tamla Motown had become too slick. True there were some great records like the Temptations' 'Papa Was A rolling Stone', but most Motown stuff seemed over-produced. Some early New Orleans funk (like The Meters' 'Cissy Strut') was good, but I can see how people missed the kind of soul and Tamla sounds from the 1960s.

My major quarrel with the 'Northern Soul' scene was always that it was too narrow-minded. It managed to dig out a lot of obscure records, but when you heard the majority of them you realised why they were obscure in the first place - they simply weren't that good!
post #11514 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankmod View Post

Soul will never die browniecj.Every generation discovers it and it is re-born and kept alive.

No it will not,because People want to go out and play it.A Footnote on the Horse and Groom.Between 5;30 and 6;30 pm(on the same night)they have a Jamaican Dj spinning Rocksteady and Early Reggae.How good is that?I will mix with your "City Types" just to listen to most of my favourite Styles of Music. smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post

On the other hand, I can remember that in 1970 onwards I felt that Tamla Motown had become too slick. True there were some great records like the Temptations' 'Papa Was A rolling Stone', but most Motown stuff seemed over-produced. Some early New Orleans funk (like The Meters' 'Cissy Strut') was good, but I can see how people missed the kind of soul and Tamla sounds from the 1960s.

My major quarrel with the 'Northern Soul' scene was always that it was too narrow-minded. It managed to dig out a lot of obscure records, but when you heard the majority of them you realised why they were obscure in the first place - they simply weren't that good!

And a lot of the ones that are big,big money,M-o-M.
post #11515 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

One thing i remember the older 15 something LOL Skinhead girls carrying was baskets .. small wooden ones in which they carried there school books ? WTF was that all about .

Well recalled.  Back in 1970 my girlfriend lugged one of those wicker baskets everywhere.  They were a pain as they took up room when you sat down somewhere together and the basket would be jabbing you in the leg.  With their open design people could see what was in them and her mates were always taking items out of it,  Pretty useless fashion accessory of the era.  I had forgotten all about them - they were not popular for long

post #11516 of 18394
What Soul and Ska did for me,was they opened up a whole wide World of Sounds.I do not think I can be "Pigeonholed" in my Tastes.I visit Clubs that play Northern,then I also visit Clubs(one of which I am going to over Easter)where Blues,Rythmn and Blues,Soul,Ska,Jazz,Boogaloo etc.will be spun.I can listen to Blues made in the 20s and 30s,Jump Blues,Mento,Calypso etc.That is what growng up in the 50s and going out to Clubs in the 60s has meant to me.biggrin.gif
post #11517 of 18394

Think it was similar to me in a way in terms of opening up different sounds. 'Inheriting' my uncles original record collection had a major influence on me. I'd been into punk early on and had got into garage etc. My uncle - and me aunts and cousins - told me they'd like reggae etc but were more into soul in 68-71 - probably also helped by the fact that my older uncles and aunts etc had been mods and similarly had been into soul, blues, R&B. His record collection had a really good selection of about 40 or 50 reggae, bluebeat and ska albums but its was the larger number of soul albums that got my attention - the first one I played was the This is Soul sampler on Atlantic, to my mind one of the best samplers, and that was it I was hooked. It was from there my collecting soul, blues, R&R and later early funk really started big time. A great period then getting hold of decent records mainly at a sensible price from shops in Caledonian Road to Berwick Street, Rock On at Camden to Soho and down the Lane. Also in odd places, I remember a discount store in Barking opening up in 79 around the corner from the Barge Aground pub and for some reason they'd go hold of original Motown, Stax, Trojan, Pama and many more labels - all in pristine condition-  and were selling them for like 50p each.

post #11518 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankmod View Post

Soul will never die browniecj.Every generation discovers it and it is re-born and kept alive.

Soul moves on anyway .. 60's Soul to 70s's funk to 80's House and onwards . British kids of all colours now have Soul inprinted in there DNA .

post #11519 of 18394
Bloody hell,wish I had visited that Shop.By then I was going to Spooky Lady,Room At The Top,Lacy Lady etc.,well into Jazz and Jazz Funk.

My biggest Influence was my Mum.She had Albums of the Platters,Ink Spots etc.,so I got into the Harmonising Groups very early.My Eldest Sister was into R&R.Her favourite Singer(behind Elvis)was Little Richard-now he opened up the "Devil`s Music" smile.gif
post #11520 of 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMc666 View Post

can I ask, were you actually involved in anyway with the skinhead or mod revivals? How do you know what the ethos was? As for being a soulie or jazz funk, not a choice for many of us, too much like normal

What do you think Skinhead was in 1969 ? it was THE fashion unlike in 79 when it was a youth cult .Youth cults as opposed to 'fashions' always take things to the extreme and lose the initial sharpness and actual fashion side of the original scene they ape . The late 70s Soul scene in London was all about labels and getting it right - aspirational dressing , looking better than the beer boys - that one upman ship that the original Mods and Skins and later Casuals all had at the core of there dressing.Much better music as well ... no one would swap a Roy ayers import LP for a Bad manners one would they .

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