or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mod to Suedehead - Page 766

post #11476 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

Roy, just to clarify - That post had nothing to do with me.it was by another bloke from another forum (soul source)I posted it because I know bit of your history with Kilburn,and thought it would be of interest to you.The bloke also openly admits to being a serious drug user/dealer back then,so take from that what you will.

Gsvs5 Thanks for clarifying that.... My fault as i read it wrong..also i did think you being Twelve in 69 hanging around West End night clubs was a bit wacky....we never went down the place full of hippies and druggies...the West End back then was a decadent seedy place.smile.gif
Edited by Lasttye - 3/28/13 at 4:42am
post #11477 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

the vast majority did and the sorts / birds all looked more like punks than proper skinhead girls.

Thats like saying all 60s skinheads were smart. But we all know they wern't, far from it.
post #11478 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by browniecj View Post

Did Dave Godin visit it?He had to give it his "Seal Of Approval" and call it "Northern Soul" biggrin.gif

He apparantly coined the term Northern Soul in the press. But the tunes he talks about were played a good couple of years before further south than he claims.
post #11479 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysgame View Post


Thats like saying all 60s skinheads were smart. But we all know they wern't, far from it.

True but i in 68 / 69 i was to young to be a well dressed Skinhead by 78 / 79 when the Boneheads turned up to my trained eyes they looked all wrong . More like Punks than Skinheads - hair far to short , trousers far to high and DM's touching there knees and jeans so tight it looked homoerotic . Also looking at the pics of the sorts on here 67 -71 they all look really ladylike and sharp .. the daft birds with dyed crops and blokes clobber of the revival era were a turn off ..  only my opinion of course 

post #11480 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

True but i in 68 / 69 i was to young to be a well dressed Skinhead by 78 / 79 when the Boneheads turned up to my trained eyes they looked all wrong . More like Punks than Skinheads - hair far to short , trousers far to high and DM's touching there knees and jeans so tight it looked homoerotic . Also looking at the pics of the sorts on here 67 -71 they all look really ladylike and sharp .. the daft birds with dyed crops and blokes clobber of the revival era were a turn off ..  only my opinion of course 

 

 

And one I share!

 

I think it is true that the really well-dressed skinheads of 1968/70 were absolutely immaculate by any standard.  A real wonder to behold.

 

Of course, and I have said this before, when you saw a large group of skins together, perhaps at Southend on a Bank Holiday, the overall impression was often one of scruffiness - at times like that I wondered if I belonged.

 

However, the original look was somehow 'softer' than the punk-inspired revival in 1979. By then I was in my mid 20s and simply didn't recognise them as skinheads. They really only had the short hair in common and through most of the period 1968/70 hair was not that short anyway.

 

The point you make about the girls is very apt. Look at the pictures Bunty has posted of his brother and girlfriend and see just how ladylike and sweet she is. True style – understated and achieved without body piercings or even obvious jewellery...

 

The other point I must make, and I know it is unpopular here, is that a modern, short-lived youth style from the late 1960s cannot really provide an exact blueprint for later generations.  What it can do IMO is provide a point of reference, a kind of yardstick against which you can assess and re-assess your future fashion choices.

post #11481 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

I didn't know that,but it led me to reading about it on soul source,which in turn led me to this post on there:

"Did you ever go into a All- night club called the La Duce? it was a all night coffee bar that you paid 5/- to get in, only to find a juke bow 3 brasses and Soho night birds, We went in one night and there were 4 flash skinheads in there, the juke box had great records on it BANG BANG LULU WET DREAM, Any way there was about 6 of us, one bloke told me he was from Kilburn, i asked him if he knew 3 fFriendsmine who were in the Wilsdon whites? he said no and he was a member of the HENDON mafia, a small firm, he said his name was Paddy O Brian, Well thats fits in with Kilburn but not with Hendon, any way after half an hour the youngest bloke with us Paul got upset because one of them started to chat him up, he was only 16, and this was 1969, it turned out that ttheLa Duce was a GAY hangout, a fight broke out and could these bloke fight as people were leaving i had to fight on me bike going up stairs, then this O Brian got a cut throat out and swiped it at my boat, i put my arm up and ssteppedhim cutting m, when i got out on the street the razor had cut through my sheepskin, suit jacket sleeve and striped me on my right arm?

just one of me SOHO adadventuresowever, O Brian and his mate, are in some skinhead fanzines that come out in the OI! PERIOD AND THTHE PICTURESRE ICONIC, i will dig them out as there is a twist to my tale??

However i raised that incident as it included the same people in this news paper article from 69.this should bring a smile to CHICHIEFYas there are a couple of BLETSOE 
boys in the article?? :g:
 by the way if you aain'tspent a night in WEST END CENTRAL you have not lived "

"AppleMark



So much for the friendliness and cameraderie of the Soul scene eh!

Bletsoe is in Northamptonshire and was a big soul venue from the early 60s along with Kelmarsh, The Tin Hat in Kettering and The Shades in Northampton . All big soul places in thouse days along with many others in the area. Everyone bangs on about Wigan and the Twisted Wheel ect. But Northampton had as big a scene as those venues but started earlier. Mostly i suspect due to the American air bases close by.
post #11482 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post


We did have a couple of people independently working on cover art, but I seem to have lost touch with them. It's something I'm looking into.

I have a contact who I am sure would love to help if need be.  Let me know.

post #11483 of 18778
I repeat not all revival skinhead were of the punk variety. I know and knew many who were just as smart as any skinhead pictures i have seen from the 60s. I also have met some people who still claim to be skinheads from the original days who clearly have no idea how to dress smart.
Its all genralisation. I have also seen some very smart and pretty sorts from the late 70s who dressed immacutely.
post #11484 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

True but i in 68 / 69 i was to young to be a well dressed Skinhead by 78 / 79 when the Boneheads turned up to my trained eyes they looked all wrong . More like Punks than Skinheads - hair far to short , trousers far to high and DM's touching there knees and jeans so tight it looked homoerotic . Also looking at the pics of the sorts on here 67 -71 they all look really ladylike and sharp .. the daft birds with dyed crops and blokes clobber of the revival era were a turn off ..  only my opinion of course 

I agree the later boneheads did look like punks and many of them would have been punks to start with....I know one thing for certain if i was 15 in 79 ...I would have been a bone head,biggrin.gif
post #11485 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post

Does anyone have a higher definition pic of that 'Young skinhead beaten up' article?

Just PM'd you.

post #11486 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by elwood View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by elwood View Post


Agree Ed, a bit surprising but Dublin Blues connection goes back to early 70s.

The scarf was certainly around in 69; I got one for Christmas that year. Still have it in the loft - well, its replacement after I was "relieved" of it in early 70. I'll try to post that story later.
 
 

Here's my "Tale of Two City Scarves".

 

The scarf I got for Christmas 69 went North East - after we played Sunderland in early 1970.

 

Behind the Platt Lane stand at Maine Road there was a very narrow passage way that was a cut-through from the front of the stadium to the big car park behind the Kippax. I was taking that short cut with a mate to get to the Kippax turnstiles and meet some other mates. There were a few lads in front of us as we turned into the alley and a couple more immediately followed up behind us. We hadn't really paid any attention to them but it was soon one of those moments where you immediately know you'd taken a wrong turn.

 

They all turned on us and within seconds I was in a headlock and a big lad from Sunderland - bigger than me anyway, not that that was saying much at the time - in a dark brown cord Wrangler jacket was throttling me (easily done with a scarf knotted in the approved "muffler" fashion) and telling me in his Wearside tones to "give us yer scarf". It didn't take too much more strangulation before he had it.

 

I knew that if I went home without it and it came out that I'd had it pinched that would be the end of my trips to Maine Road. So, somehow between me and my mates we managed to scrape together 17/6 (pre-decimal money: 87.5p post-decimal) to buy an identical replacement from the souvenir shop. Not a small amount at the time: enough to pay for 8 junior entrances at 2/3 to the Kippax. Really don't know how we managed it.

 

So I went home with a scarf, even if it wasn't the same one I went out with and that's the one that's in my loft now.

 

To top it off, as we got back to the station to catch the train home who should be hanging around on the concourse but our friends from the alleyway. Dark brown Wrangler jacket's face was a picture. He did a double take as he saw the scarf round my neck and tried to work out how I'd magically got it back. There were lots of coppers on the station for the departure of the football special back to the North East. We timed the walk to our platform so that one of them was between us and the alleyway boys and nipped on to our train. City lost one-nil that day but that was my own last minute equaliser.

 

Burnley (a) 1968

 

This match was played on 2nd March 1968 and was the first away match I went to. I traveled there with a Burnley supporting mate in his uncle's car with him and his auntie. They were all Clarets and I was the only Blue in the car. City were going great guns and there was lots of City traffic on the roads north that Saturday. The full significance of this didn't hit me until we entered the ground. Immediately on passing through the turnstile we were met with the sight of a fleeing Burnley fan being hunted down by 2 City fans who gave him a kicking and stole his scarf. In those days nearly everybody wore a football scarf and there was this practice of taking them from rival fans. The theory was if you defeated an enemy you took his scarf, in the manner of a Comanche taking a scalp from a vanquished foe. (That was the theory, anyway - in practice, I suspect that many of them were simply snatched when the wearer wasn't looking or taken by gangs from individuals - "Give us yer scarf!") I can remember seeing lads on the Kippax with 4 or 5 different scarves hanging from belt loops, epaulletes and wrists.

 

Of course, at 13 years old I understood that these things happened but this was the first time I had witnessed it up close, only a few feet away. I reckon that almost half the people in Turf Moor were Blues as City completely took over the Long Side and the open end and certainly many a Burnley fan was relieved of his scarf that day, one way or another. I actually saw City fans selling some back to young Clarets later in the afternoon. The match was quite a tight affair as Burnley had been one of the top teams through the 60's and still boasted a number of internationals in their side. The encounter was settled by a Francis Lee goal and at the final whistle you could sense the growing belief in the City crowd as this was our fifth game undefeated, having won 3 and drawn one of our previous 4 matches.The Long Side had become a second Kippax and in one mass Blues moved across it like an army, towards the open end, the exits and home.

 

Style note - at this time the look was short hair (not quite skinhead), surfer jackets (never known them to be called monkey jackets until joining this forum!) Levis and brogues. 

post #11487 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

True but i in 68 / 69 i was to young to be a well dressed Skinhead by 78 / 79 when the Boneheads turned up to my trained eyes they looked all wrong . More like Punks than Skinheads - hair far to short , trousers far to high and DM's touching there knees and jeans so tight it looked homoerotic . Also looking at the pics of the sorts on here 67 -71 they all look really ladylike and sharp .. the daft birds with dyed crops and blokes clobber of the revival era were a turn off ..  only my opinion of course 

 

Agreed.Plus I certainly would never have chosen that look for myself in '79.By that time there was just so many choices and availability of style to choose from that simply was not around ten years earlier.The Glam rock era had pushed the envelope and made a lot of unimaginable things acceptable.I' am friends with a number of people in the fashion business from Italy/Spain/US etc and they all cite London as the number one City for inspiration.We have such a rich History and back catalogue to plunder,and (generally) no longer feel the need to belong to any one particular style.I saw Bowie interviewed a number of years ago on the Jay Leno Show.Talking about the huge impact the U.K has on style ,he said something to the effect of "Yeah...stick two English boys in a room together and the conversation would probably go like - "Nice strides mate....Paul Smith ? "

The Boneheads followed the quite common mistake of men buying and wearing clothes that are slightly too small for them to the extreme.In fact they took the whole look to the extreme and completely fcuked it up for me visually.The splattered bleached jeans probably was the hardest pill to swallow as they were an iconic item to us that were revered and cared for with the utmost respect.I suppose that was due to Punk?

post #11488 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysgame View Post


Bletsoe is in Northamptonshire and was a big soul venue from the early 60s along with Kelmarsh, The Tin Hat in Kettering and The Shades in Northampton . All big soul places in thouse days along with many others in the area. Everyone bangs on about Wigan and the Twisted Wheel ect. But Northampton had as big a scene as those venues but started earlier. Mostly i suspect due to the American air bases close by.

 

At the risk of opening up a can of worms.........  I think people go on about The Twisted Wheel and then later, Wigan Casino, not because no-one else was playing Soul music, but because of the type of Soul they were playing.(Possibly also because they were among the very first "all - nighters") Whereas many clubs were playing the latest Soul sounds, in the north clubs were still playing a large number of sides from the mid sixties. Dave Godin noticed that people from "Up North" were trying to buy these types of records when visiting record shops in London and coined the term "Northern Soul". As we are all aware, "Up North" to some people refers to anywhere north of Luton! The Twisted Wheel opened in the early sixties and wasn't even the only Soul club in Manchester. Virtually every northern town had a Soul Club or at the very least a venue where this type of music was played, catering originally for mods, they continued through the skinhead era because the demand was still there. A lot of snobbery out there regarding "Northern Soul" . When we went out to Soul clubs  the northern classics were played (now known as 60's Soul Club Classics) but so was Sam Cooke, The Crystals, Motown and other stuff that would be dismissed out of hand by "Northern Soul" fans today.

post #11489 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasttye View Post


Gsvs5 Thanks for clarifying that.... My fault as i read it wrong..also i did think you being Twelve in 69 hanging around West End night clubs was a bit wacky....we never went down the place full of hippies and druggies...the West End back then was a decadent seedy place.smile.gif

 

That's a funny thought Lasttye because I was hanging around some Mods and druggies in the Midlands at that age !

My first visit to the West End was also around that time - albeit in the safety of daytime.We got to go down to Wembley with the school for the Schoolboys International matches.needless to say that was nothing more than a shopping trip for us scallywags.We never saw a ball kicked.As soon as our teachers had left us on our own we shot off,about half a dozen of us ,'UP" the West End.First stop was Tottenham Court Rd and a visit to Contempo in Hanaway St.Then a couple of hours wandering the length of Oxford St in awe.When you think of the provincial towns we were from and then to be in Oxford St in those days,it was amazing.Take 6,Lord John,Ravel etc didn't exist in our world back up the M6.This started a trend for the next few years untill a couple of lads got nicked for shoplifting I believe and that put an end to it.I don't remember what year it was,but I recall buying a little bunch of Cherries that the Girls pinned on their coats,as a gift for my Sister.That was a big fashion item at the time,but it may have been 71 0r 72 I think?

 

 

post #11490 of 18778
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysgame View Post

He apparantly coined the term Northern Soul in the press. But the tunes he talks about were played a good couple of years before further south than he claims.


I remember reading his Column,in "Blues and Soul" and thinking W.T,F?It seemed to me(in the very early 70s) that People were going backwards in their choice of Music.I remember seeing the Adverts for Va Va`s in Bolton and others(with the Artists Names and Record Titles written around the edge of the Advert).Some of the Records I remembered from listening to Clubs in London-during the mid/late 60s.Not all played Chart Soul,and that was down to the American Servicemen then the laterJamaican Influence.I have one or two Blanks of Soul Records,made in Jamaica,that are not easily recognisable "Soul" Records.Owen Gray,Jackie Edwards and Jackie Opel(to name a few)made good Soul Records-that were heard in Jamaican Clubs.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Mod to Suedehead