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Mod to Suedehead - Page 752

post #11266 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirryacus View Post

Any of you guys familiar with samuel smith's nut brown ale? I picked up a very old bar mirror with their logo on it and I seem hard pressed to find many old articles or vintage items for sale that bear their insignia, it all seems to be mostly newer items for sale.
Back in 1980, my company car was hit by one of their dray lorries... which then buggered off. nod[1].gif

http://www.samuelsmithsbrewery.co.uk/
post #11267 of 18636

crazy stuff about the truck hitting you, did you ever catch up to them and make their company pay yours? anyway thanks I think I found the email I needed to get the requested info which is from their importer to the united states.

post #11268 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post


... as long as you are happy mate.

There are - as yet - no govenment laws dictating what we should wear, and life's too short - please yourself, first. biggrin.gif

Thanks Ed.Your a Gentleman.I asked for critique and got the predictable(the american cravat comment was funny) I long ago went thru the question of plaid shirt with Harrington clash and decided I ain't gonna think that hard about it.While I appreciate the style discussion here I have a very different desire.I have always wanted to be a cartoon.Cartoons only have one outfit.It never changes.Mr.Einstein had 3 suits all the same so,he always looked the same.I try to do the same with only a few slight variations.This probably seems rediculous to yooz folks but I'm not exactly "normal".I have a lot of contrary ideas.What I appreciate in terms of style was (like many here) established long ago.I'm also at an age where I am nostalgic (which I've never been before) and am returning to some clothing items I had forgotten.A lot of what I wear is also utilitarian.I'm not offended at all by the comments.I've always been the odd one out and it's like water off da ducks back.Cheers

post #11269 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirryacus View Post

crazy stuff about the truck hitting you, did you ever catch up to them and make their company pay yours? anyway thanks I think I found the email I needed to get the requested info which is from their importer to the united states.
[
[/quote]Yes, but the insurers ended up putting it down as a 50/50 knock which, considering i was parked at the time, was unfair... but a lack of independent witnesses didn't help.

C'est la vie. satisfied.gif
post #11270 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirryacus View Post

Any of you guys familiar with samuel smith's nut brown ale? I picked up a very old bar mirror with their logo on it and I seem hard pressed to find many old articles or vintage items for sale that bear their insignia, it all seems to be mostly newer items for sale.

 

During the second world war my mum was not called up as she was in a reserved occupation i.e. doing "essential war work". Her job? She worked for Samuel Smith's Brewery!  I kid you not - known locally as "Taddy Ales".  Two things that are vital to keep Britain functioning - tea and beer!

post #11271 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post

During the second world war my mum was not called up as she was in a reserved occupation i.e. doing "essential war work". Her job? She worked for Samuel Smith's Brewery!  I kid you not - known locally as "Taddy Ales".  Two things that are vital to keep Britain functioning - tea and beer!
Ah, but surely Tadcaster is the wrong side of the hill - no? satisfied.gif
post #11272 of 18636

I hate to derail the thread further but the story was the sign came out of an old bar a few towns away from me in a small farming community which incidentally was from the same era as skinhead, In any case I am some what line with yankmod I am not so much here for the skinhead clothing style discussion per se(as its nearly identical to the 50's/60's era old american preppy rich kids) which are some what of my rivals, but rather the discussion of the 60's in general and the general appreciation of youth subcultures as a whole and their working class roots, tis ironic that the people whom influenced so much of the style most likely would have been more hated enemies than the greasers had you ran into them on social level.

post #11273 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post


Ah, but surely Tadcaster is the wrong side of the hill - no? satisfied.gif

Very perceptive Ed! My Mum was based at Manor Brewery in Rochdale which was a subsiduary of Samuel Smith's and they brewed Taddy Ales.  When my Dad came out of the navy, he got a job as a drayman there (oops!) and that is where they met. 

post #11274 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirryacus View Post

I hate to derail the thread further but the story was the sign came out of an old bar a few towns away from me in a small farming community which incidentally was from the same era as skinhead, In any case I am some what line with yankmod I am not so much here for the skinhead clothing style discussion per se(as its nearly identical to the 50's/60's era old american preppy rich kids) which are some what of my rivals, but rather the discussion of the 60's in general and the general appreciation of youth subcultures as a whole and their working class roots, tis ironic that the people whom influenced so much of the style most likely would have been more hated enemies than the greasers had you ran into them on social level.

 

Sirryacus - just for you! - Sorry, I can't get the photos to post. I'll have to sort myself out!

 

When I was 17, It Was A Very Good Year

 

 

1960-1963

 

The early 60s – Searching for something

 

Beatniks, ‘Trad Jazz’ the remnants of ‘skiffle’, Ban the Bomb, these were all influences on teenagers at the time. I’m sure many were searching for some kind of identity (again, anyone know any better out there?) Some of these were seen as ‘intellectual’ or something of interests to students but none the less  I remember my sister at the age of 14 wearing an anorac and a ‘Ban The Bomb’ badge in 1962 (to be replaced by the suade jacket and ski pants of the mod girl 2 years later!) Of course to many the Rock ‘n’Roll look still prevailed or the ‘New Latin’ look of Italian Jackets and Cuban Heeled boots (or a mixture of the 2).

 

 

This all changed when the Beatles emerged in 1963 and Britain became the most ‘Fab’ place on earth for a year or three. This was Beatlemania and very soon became mainsream culture –  fringed hair, tailored suits (collarless ‘Beatle’ suits) ankle boots with heels, polar necked sweaters, with skirts for the girls gradually getting shorter, not yet truly ‘mini’.Whilst the Beatles were undoubtedly leaders of fashion up until the late sixties, this was not a look that you ‘belonged to’, it was just something that was happening. Until Easter 1964. This was the weekend when the newspapers and telivision carried reports of ‘trouble’ between rival groups of youths at Clacton  - the Mods and the Rockers. The effect of this was almost instantaneous and by the following Bank Holiday in May it seemed as if the whole of Britains working class youth had split itself into one or other of the two camps and there was trouble at a number  of resorts involving hundreds of teenagers. I can remember, as a 9 year old, mock fights in the playground at Byron Street between the ‘Mods’ and the ‘Rockers’, such was the impact of these events.

 

 

 

1964- 1968

 

Rockers

 

There were Rockers in Royton (quite a few actually) though I don’t recall that many motorbikes. This was the ‘tough’ look of the lads who worked in the mills (remember them?!?). Still into Rock ‘n’ Roll, hair style had hardly changed since the late 50s. Did they have a favourite ‘caff’ in Royton where they would all meet? (the sort of place where the daughters of ‘respectable’ families were forbidden to go!) Ages of Rockers would be 16 up to possibly early 20s and their big thing was the ‘bike’- speed (doing a ‘ton’- 100mph). Rocker girls wore heavy make up, back combed hair, either ‘biker gear’ or short skirts (a bit like Cher on a bad day!) and generally looked a bit ‘slutty’ (though if any of you are reading this I’m sure you were nice girls really!) The Rocker look hardly changed through the sixties but they all wanted to project a tough, macho image, which many of them were prepared to live up to.

 

 

 

The Mods

 

The Mod ‘look’ had started to grow up in the early 60’s in London, but probably was quite unknown anywhere else until the Bank Holiday disturbances of early 1964. The major difference with Mod was that it was an ever evolving cult, styles changed, haistyles came and went and musical preferences switched in the endless search to be ‘with it’ (though actually the true Mods wanted to be ahead of it!). The media coverage brought thousands of kids into the Mod fold, and of course the highlighted trouble brought a new kind of mod, not the dandified, (to the Rockers, effeminate) sharp suited  stylists of its origin, but the masses of working class kids who were happy to dress in Levis, Fred Perry’s and suade ‘desert boots’, mount a scooter and go looking for the action. Image was everything to the Mod and everything had to be ‘right’ – the right clothes, with the right labels, not just any old scooter – Lambrettas were the order of the day in Royton, with the right ‘decorations’. Of course not everybody had a scooter. For a start you had to be 16 to ride one, and there weren’t that many  in Royton.

 Lots of kids aspired to be Mods however and the high street shops catered for their tastes. Some styles remained throughout thou, Parkas, Levis and 3 button, narrow lapel jackets (very 60s). Mods could be aged from 15 upto about 20 though most were 16 or 17.  Pop culture both lead and was influenced by Mod Style which evolved from this kind of look in 1964

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through to this kind of look in 1966-67

 

                                                      

 

 

In 1966 half the lads at Our Lady’s looked like this!

 

The search for the new lead to different music styles being adopted through the years, R & B, Sca (or bluebeat as it was known), British Beat groups and Soul, whatever was seen to be cool and could be danced to. The Mod years were really 1964-1966 though people were still refered to as Mods as late as 1968.

 

Next time – Mod gives birth to the hippy and skinhead.

post #11275 of 18636
@Royton Boy

Try uploading the photo's in styleforum by clicking on the painting icon in the Reply bar, then click upload files (if you have the photos stored on your pc), and it will upload it automatically and post the image link in your post after you have chosen size (small-medium-large) for the photo to appear on this page. Hope this helps smile.gif
post #11276 of 18636
Quote:

Originally Posted by roytonboy View Post


Did they have a favourite ‘caff’ in Royton where they would all meet? (the sort of place where the daughters of ‘respectable’ families were forbidden to go!) 

 

 

The 'Caff's' .Yet another part of our typical English culture that has eroded slowly away with time .Pioneered and perfected by the Italian post war immigrants and continue today in a form almost unrecognisable to the classic of it's heyday.My earliest recolection of entering one was on a busy Saturday lunchtime in Newcastle-u-Lyme, I followed my Mum and fought my way into the door of an otherwise unrecognisable shopfront.The whole front widows were opaque with condensation,disguising the cacaphony and social opera that was playing out inside.Filled with hissing steam ,froffy coffee, Formica,Vitrolite and fag smoke as far as my eyes could see,all wrapped up is glossy painted walls the colours of Germoline and Clotted Cream.

A Spartan retreat from the cold ,wet streets and part of your daily life as working class English.

I make an effort every time I return home to England to seek one out and pray it is still there and clutching on at least to some of its honesty. 

 

To give our foreign friends an idea of what I mean,here's a couple from Lattsys old neiborhood,that are sadly gone, (Apparently Joe Strummer and Paul Simenon were regulars in the late 1970s at the first place and it briefly appears Clashs' vehicle Rude Boy -it closed in '04 I believe)

 

 

 

post #11277 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirryacus View Post

I hate to derail the thread further but the story was the sign came out of an old bar a few towns away from me in a small farming community which incidentally was from the same era as skinhead, In any case I am some what line with yankmod I am not so much here for the skinhead clothing style discussion per se(as its nearly identical to the 50's/60's era old american preppy rich kids) which are some what of my rivals, but rather the discussion of the 60's in general and the general appreciation of youth subcultures as a whole and their working class roots, tis ironic that the people whom influenced so much of the style most likely would have been more hated enemies than the greasers had you ran into them on social level.

You have to remember or understand that the first Mods were not working class kids but sons of middle class jews from north london ( normally tailors ) . Working class Blacks and Whites in the US in the 60s rocked the Ivy look as much as anyone .

post #11278 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Vaughan View Post











This last one (deleted~) was already on the site - sorry.

the crackin sort in the top pic ive seen pictures of before ..  i would have died to have had her on my arm in 1970 ..  mind you i was 12 so any bird would have done.

post #11279 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfronted View Post

You have to remember or understand that the first Mods were not working class kids but sons of middle class jews from north london ( normally tailors ) . Working class Blacks and Whites in the US in the 60s rocked the Ivy look as much as anyone .

Hell I was talking about Skinheads mostly not the earlier mods, obviously I have some kind of disconnect in there somewhere because it seems like you are telling me working class skinheads never wore the ivy look , in any case I don't like the Ivy league look too much it has different connotations in my mind from my own experiences.

post #11280 of 18636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsvs5 View Post

The 'Caff's' .Yet another part of our typical English culture that has eroded slowly away with time .Pioneered and perfected by the Italian post war immigrants and continue today in a form almost unrecognisable to the classic of it's heyday.My earliest recolection of entering one was on a busy Saturday lunchtime in Newcastle-u-Lyme, I followed my Mum and fought my way into the door of an otherwise unrecognisable shopfront.The whole front widows were opaque with condensation,disguising the cacaphony and social opera that was playing out inside.Filled with hissing steam ,froffy coffee, Formica,Vitrolite and fag smoke as far as my eyes could see,all wrapped up is glossy painted walls the colours of Germoline and Clotted Cream.
A Spartan retreat from the cold ,wet streets and part of your daily life as working class English.
I make an effort every time I return home to England to seek one out and pray it is still there and clutching on at least to some of its honesty. 

To give our foreign friends an idea of what I mean,here's a couple from Lattsys old neiborhood,that are sadly gone, (Apparently Joe Strummer and Paul Simenon were regulars in the late 1970s at the first place and it briefly appears Clashs' vehicle Rude Boy -it closed in '04 I believe)







I remember going into our local cafe in West Kilburn early 60s with my older brother ....their was always a pin ball machine in the corner with a left over Teddy Boy playing it...A plate of chips and a bottle of Coke was always a treat.
Years later in 68 we would hang around Mick's Cafe in Willesden Lane Kilburn, it would be wall to wall with teenagers..we would sit there all night listening to the jukebox the owner Mick never rushed us out. It was the first real time that we would socialise with girls..a completely different game for many a Lad. It was such a glorious innocent time.smile.gif
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