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Australian Members - Page 628

post #9406 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selvaggio View Post

I can't remember - must be a supressed memory - but I rember walking in to their Sydney Centrpoint store and laughing - out loud - when I flipped up the sole ...what was it, close to $1,000?

$1,094. I flipped out. Who do they think they are? Edward Green? I feel sorry for the poor suckers who spend that much. Sure, they are a welted shoe with a closed channel sole, but the last shape is clunky, ugly and the leather quality looked average.

My C&J handgrades look like the bargain of the century compared to those.
post #9407 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by __PG__ View Post


$1,094. I flipped out. Who do they think they are? Edward Green? I feel sorry for the poor suckers who spend that much. Sure, they are a welted shoe with a closed channel sole, but the last shape is clunky, ugly and the leather quality looked average.
My C&J handgrades look like the bargain of the century compared to those.


Edward Green wishes they were Lloyds ...

 

JL, G&G and Vass are quaking in their non-Lloyds boots.

post #9408 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

blah - thats great - any chance of getting me a scan of the complete sheet /book?

Just pop over to the Outlet store. It's just hanging there for everyone to see. I know you live down that way laugh.gif


And speaking of shoes... Who might make Boss Selection Goodyear welted Made in Italy shoes? Surely there can't be that many makers as Blake is by far more popular a stitched manufacturing method.
post #9409 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post

Just pop over to the Outlet store. It's just hanging there for everyone to see. I know you live down that way laugh.gif

No I don't - I'm an international man of mystery - but I did work over near those outlets a while back.

did you snap it with yr phone you cheeky bugger?
post #9410 of 58025
Snap what with my phone? laugh.gif
post #9411 of 58025
I'm going to say something and i hope i dont get a whole lot of sh#t from you here guys. But does anybody else in this thread agree that sometimes people sacrifice looks for quality? and i dont mean because of lack of funding.

There are some clear standouts imho such as p.johnson, zegna, incotex, GC, lobb, crockett & jones etc that get the balance between traditional mens tailoring and with the times sleek, well designed clothes/footwear that take into consideration whats in fashion at the present moment. Though i dont see the appeal in conservative brands like church's, allen edmonds, H freeman, isaia or even in some respects Brioni and Kiton.

I understand that mens tailoring and fashion are two different kettles of fish, but i just like many of you i believe are drawn to mens tailoring by the aesthetic just as much as the love of quality, luxury items. Do you think that some people go to far or should i just be looking at it from the angle of yet another aesthetic choice from a different group of people?

Is it such a crime that i would rather wear a pair of hugo boss shoes than allen edmonds?

apologies for the rant :-)
post #9412 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by RemyMichel View Post

I'm going to say something and i hope i dont get a whole lot of sh#t from you here guys. But does anybody else in this thread agree that sometimes people sacrifice looks for quality? and i dont mean because of lack of funding.
There are some clear standouts imho such as p.johnson, zegna, incotex, GC, lobb, crockett & jones etc that get the balance between traditional mens tailoring and with the times sleek, well designed clothes/footwear that take into consideration whats in fashion at the present moment. Though i dont see the appeal in conservative brands like church's, allen edmonds, H freeman, isaia or even in some respects Brioni and Kiton.
I understand that mens tailoring and fashion are two different kettles of fish, but i just like many of you i believe are drawn to mens tailoring by the aesthetic just as much as the love of quality, luxury items. Do you think that some people go to far or should i just be looking at it from the angle of yet another aesthetic choice from a different group of people?
Is it such a crime that i would rather wear a pair of hugo boss shoes than allen edmonds?
apologies for the rant :-)

 

I agree. Most people I've seen so far dress really nicely but there are a few who I feel make some strange choices 
 

 

post #9413 of 58025
^^ Just difference in aesthetic preferences, that's all. One has to remember that the demographics here range between late teens/early twenties all the way up to 60+ and from all over the world. Influences to their choice of clothing - even though we're still talking about suits here - can be quite different.

That said, AEs are butt ugly.
post #9414 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightace View Post

Here's a question:

I take UK size 7- 7.5, it varies depending on the brand.

I have Church's, L'Stony and Lloyds in UK size 7, all of which fit very well.

I have these Cheaneys in UK7. Unforunately, they are too small. 7.5 would probably be perfect in this style.

I went and measured my foot on a Brannock device, which gives US sizes, and it said size 10. Additionally, the sizing chart from the Allen Edmonds website also said I'm a US size 10.

Everything I've read says there is one digit difference between UK and US sizes.

So the question is, is this usual? Has anyone else had a similar experience?

Cheers,

Eightace

Impossible. Must have been measured wrongly. Too much disparity.
post #9415 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Hi guys
On Saturday we are heading off to the frozen North for our holidays. Most of my friends think I am certifiably mad, and I'm starting to suspect they're right.
We'll be spending most of our time in Norway, going as far North as Tromso, taking a cruise up the fjords on the way. On the way back we'll make whistlestops in Stockholm and Copenhagen. It'll certainly be different to the usual Aussie summer holiday.
I'm told that Scanidnavia is horrifically expensive, so I'm not expecting any sartorial bargains. Maybe in Bangkok airport en route, perhaps.
Catch up with you in a few weeks

What could possess you to go there at this time of year? Love of frostbite? Acquavit? Herring? Midnight sun?
post #9416 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post


 You can nearly buy one yourself for the price of returning a pair of shoes - or trying to sell a pair that don't fit - {wink}.
 


Ha ha, nice one smile.gif



Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


Impossible. Must have been measured wrongly. Too much disparity.


Well, that's what I thought, but that's what comes up.

 

Honestly, shoe sizing is a dark art.

post #9417 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightace View Post



Ha ha, nice one smile.gif


Well, that's what I thought, but that's what comes up.

Honestly, shoe sizing is a dark art.

Sure you didn't read the women's scale instead?
post #9418 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post


Sure you didn't read the women's scale instead?


Very sure. I used the one in the men's shoe department in Myer. But I will double-check next time I go to DJs.

post #9419 of 58025
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightace View Post



Very sure. I used the one in the men's shoe department in Myer. But I will double-check next time I go to DJs.

As meister said somethings wrong. And shoe fitting really isn't a dark art. You've heard th old saying : If the shoe fits - wear it.

The Athletic Foot or Foot locker or ?? (or some similar sounding name) is a good place to go for a fit.

They have a super modern thingo that looks at footprint, interesting in terms of a quick and dirty but not as good as a podiatrist video and exam.

The Athletic Foot place often has student podiatrists as sales people.

They dont seem to mind if you just go in for a fitting. Keep in mind they are for sport shoes and "walkers" and I think USA sizes, but for all that they will use a Brannock and know how to use it.

I always think anyone who cares about their feet should have a basic exam by a podiatrist. They will look at gait, pronation etc and advise on foot health. A good podiatrist should also be able to give you your shoe requirements. Mine specifically recommends against "soft" shoes like Rockports for foot problems. He reckons around 60% of even serious foot problems are caused by ill fitting shoes. Naturally womens feet suffer the most but men will wear too small or too big shoes for years. Just look around you.

As you will have noted blahman wears womens shoes and I would not advise going down that route.Unless like J Edgar Hoover you find it very very relaxing.
post #9420 of 58025
Fletcher Jones: from rags to riches … to rags
Benjamin Preiss and Henrietta Cook January 7, 2012
http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/fletcher-jones-from-rags-to-riches-8230-to-rags-20120106-1pomd.html

THE sprawling factory is long closed, but the sturdy machines that sewed Fletcher Jones trousers for generations of Australians still whir in Warrnambool homes. Lorraine Pola has one. It's been serviced just once since she bought it in 1988.

The machines are the legacy of a company that once stood for quality and workmanship. After almost a century in business Fletcher Jones fell into administration last month, but in Warrnambool the legend of the brand and its namesake founder lives on.

Ms Pola, a former Fletcher Jones employee, remembers the daily ritual of knocking off when more than 1000 workers spilled into the streets. ''If you had to do any shopping [you had to] get it done before Fletcher Jones closed,'' she says. ''The street would be flooded, particularly on pay day.''

She watched sadly as the famed Australian brand crumbled, with administrators closing a third of its 45 stores - even its last Warrnambool shop. A final offer for the sale of the company, which employed 3000 people across four factories in its heyday, is expected in coming weeks.

But Ms Pola's gunmetal grey Brother sewing machine still hums in her sunroom, where she runs a bridal gown business.

She started working as a machinist at Fletcher Jones at 16 and was greeted by friendly faces, ''a warm feeling'' and the smell of siroset - a chemical used to set pleats.

Workers revered Sir Fletcher Jones and Ms Pola says the company had a policy of employing indigenous and disabled people. ''He was very much into humanity,'' she says. ''We had people in wheelchairs, people with cerebral palsy, one girl was profoundly deaf.''

She fears his legacy as a philanthropist is being forgotten amid news of the crumbling business.

The revolutionary businessman lived in a two-bedroom cottage in Warrnambool and rewarded employees with shares in Fletcher Jones. By the 1970s staff owned more than 70 per cent of the company. He greeted employees in the morning and mingled in the canteen queue.

But now the factory is a shadow of its former self. The walls of the once bustling canteen are plastered with graffiti and glass litters the floor. A mouldy stench has replaced the smell of siroset. The only sign of life is shoppers browsing through an antique market that occupies part of the factory.

It was a slick operation when Jack Caple was a trouser production manager who oversaw the creation of 1000 pairs of slacks a day. The spritely 93-year-old, who still wears ''FJ'' trousers, was Fletcher Jones' first ''rehab employee'' after World War II.

''Mr Jones picked me up after the dawn service. He used to stutter and said 'h-h-h-hop in the car Jack', and he brought me out here.''

The Rat of Tobruk had a 33-year career with the company, starting as a machinist, slightly embarrassed to find himself surrounded by women.

''This place was loaded with machines, it was full of life,'' he says, scanning his dilapidated former workplace.

Mr Caple describes Jones as a savvy businessman who planted extravagant gardens to please councillors who worried the site would become an eyesore. The factory and its postwar gardens are now heritage-listed.

Born into a Methodist family in Bendigo in 1895, David Fletcher Jones had a severe stutter and left school at 12. He had an impoverished upbringing and was deeply moved when people left plucked chickens at his family's doorstep.

After returning from World War I in 1918, deemed unfit to work, he began selling bespoke clothing from the back of a horse-drawn wagon in western Victoria. Demand for his tailored wares grew and in 1924 he opened three shops in Warrnambool and one in Hamilton.

Sir Fletcher Jones died in 1977 and his son David became managing director.

The Dimmick family bought the company in 1995 and 10 years later the factory closed.

Mr Jones jnr died last month, just 36 hours before administrators took over the crumbling company.

Economic geographer Sally Weller, whose book with Michael Webber Refashioning the Rag Trade traces the history of the Victorian clothing industry, says poor branding compromised the business.

The Dimmick family made an ''ill-advised'' decision to sell the garments in discount outlets, Ms Weller says. ''Discounting put the brand into direct competition with cheaper imports.'' She says the company should have focused on a niche market with a ''middle-class respectability''.

When the Hawke-Keating government scrapped protective tariffs in 1991, the company changed forever. ''Fletcher Jones closed manufacturing plants and shifted to offshore sourcing while retaining some local content,'' Ms Weller says.

The company's dedication to workers also reflected strong earnings, she says. ''The company was making a good profit and its brand was associated with the welfare of its employees.''

Former employees say they were crushed when the factory closed its doors. ''They acted like it was the end of the world,'' Mr Caple says. ''At the time it was a real goldmine for Warrnambool. People had money and bought their homes and educated their children.''
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