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post #65446 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Contango View Post

Does anyone know of a cobbler in Sydney who can install flush steel toe-taps? I called Double Monk in Melbourne and they tell me that they just sell the taps, but don't install them. So I'm half-way there!

Given much how I trash the toe of my shoes I really need to give them a try.

 

 

I think that a lot of - if not all - Australian cobblers would be reluctant to install the sunken toe-taps as it requires them to skive a bit off the soles of the shoes so that the toe-taps are flush with the soles. Therefore, you may have difficulty finding a place to install them for you.

 

You may know this already, but you can get pretty much any cobbler to install metal or nylon crescent-shaped toe-taps on the toes of your shoes.

 

They don't look as nice as the sunken toe-taps but they still work very well and they are cheap, durable and can be fitted by anyone. Given that pretty much no-one except yourself will see the bottom of your shoes, it could be worth just settling for the common, garden variety toe-taps.

post #65447 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

You may know this already, but you can get pretty much any cobbler to install metal or nylon crescent-shaped toe-taps on the toes of your shoes.
...
they still work very well and they are cheap, durable and can be fitted by anyone. .

My thoughts exactly.

My old man used to put them on my shoes for me.
post #65448 of 67946
Yep, one of the cobblers I asked suggested that, unfortunately I seem to have a habit of not only wearing my soles down at the very front/toe, but also of knocking them along the edge/lip. On pairs I get Topy'd it seems to cause the Topy to separate from the sole at the front.
post #65449 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post
 

 

I would also like to know. Don't think Brices and Coombs do it. I might just ask Coombs again.

 

I asked Coombs a few weeks back and they confirmed they don't do flush top tap, even if you supply them.

 

Double Monk is going to open in the Stand Arcade soon, probably by the end of this month.

 

I found a cobbler who is willing to install flush top tap in Crows nest. The price is very reasonable, but unfortunately his top taps are quite old school and looking horrible. 

 

I think I will buy the toe taps from DM and get this cobbler in crows nest to install for me.

 

I will report back if he is able to do a good job.

post #65450 of 67946

Got few questions about removing stains from my tan shoes. 

 

I have a pair of tan brogue wingtip. I much prefer the vintage look so I am trying to change the colour to a darker shade. 

 

A newbie mistake. I think I have used an old cloth when applying dark brown cream, which ultimately stained my tan colour with dark/black stains.

 

I tried using Renomat to remove it but with not much success. 

 

How do you use Renomat properly? there is no instruction other than the pictogram on the bottle. 

 

Any other tips to remove the black stains? 

 

Other tips to archive a proper vintage style shade on a tan shoes?


Edited by flexiflex - 10/11/15 at 9:47pm
post #65451 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by flexiflex View Post
 

Got a questions about removing stains from my tanned shoes. 

 

I have a pair of tanned brogue wingtip. I much prefer the vintage look so I am trying to change the colour to a darker shade. 

 

A newbie mistake. I think I have used an old cloth when applying dark brown cream, which ultimately stained my tanned colour with dark/black stains.

 

I tried using Renomat to remove it but with not much success. 

 

How do you use Renomat properly? there is no instruction other than the pictogram on the bottle. 

 

Any other tips to remove the black stains? 

 

Other tips to archive a proper vintage style shade on a tanned shoes?

 

I went through the same mistake.

 

In my case, I removed the old polish with a cloth soaked in some vodka. The cream is just a layer on top of the leather. It should come off quite easily.

 

Try Collonil Diamante Burgundy cream. Easier to apply, and will turn the tan color to a rich darker brown.

 

On the order hand, just keep wearing the shoes and polishing them, and after a few years, you will the get vintage look you are after.

post #65452 of 67946
Have some tan shoes I want to darken. Assume saphir burgundy would achieve the same outcome?
post #65453 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Have some tan shoes I want to darken. Assume saphir burgundy would achieve the same outcome?

 

I found Saphir more difficult to work with than Collonil. It takes longer to dry and is difficult to spread evenly. However, I think the color outcome would be the same, which is close to a rich cognac brown.

post #65454 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

I found Saphir more difficult to work with than Collonil. It takes longer to dry and is difficult to spread evenly. However, I think the color outcome would be the same, which is close to a rich cognac brown.

Interesting, I know what you mean about the getting the even spread. I might start with a saphir dark brown cream to be safe.
post #65455 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post


Interesting, I know what you mean about the getting the even spread. I might start with a saphir dark brown cream to be safe.

 

I tried Saphir Marron. Did not work as well as the burgundy. It is counterintuitive, I know....in fact, Saphir Hermes Red worked better on tan than Marron. Start with the back heel first as the test area. If something goes wrong, vodka will strip the cream easily

post #65456 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

I tried Saphir Marron. Did not work as well as the burgundy. It is counterintuitive, I know....in fact, Saphir Hermes Red worked better on tan than Marron. Start with the back heel first as the test area. If something goes wrong, vodka will strip the cream easily

Cheers Pete.

Hopefully won't have to waste any vodka.
post #65457 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Hopefully won't have to waste any vodka.

 

 

Just don't drink too much of the vodka while you're polishing, otherwise things may go awry!

post #65458 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post


They are Prosciutto Wrapped Figs And Blue Cheese.

Bloody big figs.

Much more posh than a Melbourne get together.
The get togethers are classier when you're not there.
post #65459 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post


The get togethers are classier when you're not there.

 

Yes, like that time you bought us all dinner at Vue De Monde. I'll never forget it.

post #65460 of 67946
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Have some tan shoes I want to darken. Assume saphir burgundy would achieve the same outcome?
Use Colinol 1919 or Diamante - Its the same stuff with a new name. Take any waxy stuff off with acetone - buy in 4 litres from Bunnings.

Start with cream a shade darker than existing.

Easy enough to get that streaky alternating tones look so coveted by iGentts if you are going darker. With the cream you can streak it yourself as you go if you want. Alternate with a mid brown and a burgundy or mahogany colour cream.

I've done some pairs by just putting on a darker cream each clean/polish - no hurry.
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