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post #53161 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhound View Post

Should have jumped on TOJ when you had the chance.

The current wait times suck though.

Cockpit USA jackets seem like a good deal, Fox.

Any experience?
post #53162 of 57112
Bobs on at the Palais. My (now) favourite nephew is shouting me. Otherwise I wouldn't bother too much. I hear hes in good form though. Bob Dylan, the voice of youth at 73 (Click to show)
Bob Dylan, the voice of youth at 73
Thursday 3 July 2014 11:13AM Mark Sutton
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/bob … 73/5568804

In the popular mind, no figure better represents the protest movements of the 1960s than Bob Dylan. Yet for most of his long career and through his many different incarnations, Dylan has shied away from being the spokesperson many want him to be. Mark Sutton explores the expectations that continue to dog ‘the Big Bubba of Rebellion’.

There’s a classic Peanuts comic where Linus tells Charlie Brown that Bob Dylan has just turned 30. Charlie Brown responds, ‘That’s the most depressing thing I’ve ever heard.’

That comic was published over four decades ago.

Throughout his life Dylan has largely been controversial only when his words or deeds smacked of acceptability, when he does anything that suggests he might not be the constantly protesting mouthpiece many still consider him to be.


This August Bob Dylan is touring Australia. He is 73. For some, that’s cause to jump out of your chair and go and line up for tickets. For others, that’s cause to curse his name and tell the world that last time you saw him, in 2011, or 2007, or 2003 or whenever it was, that (without even an ‘it’s great to be in Adelaide’), he desultorily growled through a few tunes you didn’t recognise in a voice that sounded strange.

The thing is—believe it or not—today Bob Dylan sounds different to how he did in the sixties.

Back then, in the words of Greil Marcus, Dylan ‘seemed less to occupy a turning point in cultural space and time than to be that turning point’. Alongside The Beatles, Dylan is the preeminent musical symbol of that increasingly mythologised decade. Outside music, he arguably even outshines the Fab Four as a political symbol. Dylan, arm in arm with Joan Baez, Peter, Paul and Mary, Theodore Bikel and the Freedom Singers singing ‘We Shall Overcome’ at the 1963 Newport Folk Festival remains one of the most optimistic and emotionally charged images of the decade, just as his electric performance at the same festival two years later remains one of its most controversial watersheds.

The image of the scruffy young folk singer warbling about the answer blowin’ in the wind has been crystallised into a symbol of the politics of a defiant decade—of civil rights and ‘ban the bomb’. He even conjures memories of the anti-Vietnam war protest movement—though in fact he never really made any major statement on the subject and had essentially withdrawn from political discourse before the USA got involved.

For Dylan, being a quintessential image of youthful rebellion and peace has been something of a prison. He has been unable to escape not only the shadow of the work he created, but his cultural position as a perceived ‘voice of a generation’, despite repeated disavowals of any such label. As Dylan himself wrote in his memoir: ‘Wherever I am, I’m a ‘60s troubadour, a folk-rock relic, a wordsmith from bygone days, a fictitious head of state from a place nobody knows.’

He’s still expected to be a protest leader. In 2011, when Dylan made his first concert tour of China, there was a mini-furore amongst op-ed columnists after it was suggested that because Dylan hadn’t played ‘Blowin’ in the Wind’ in Beijing he must have kowtowed to pressure from the Chinese government.

It didn’t matter that at time ‘Blowin’ In The Wind’ was rarely part of Dylan’s set list, or that he did play several songs that could have plausibly caused a stir, such as ‘Ballad of a Thin Man’, ‘Like A Rolling Stone’, ‘All Along The Watchtower’, and ‘Gonna Change My Way of Thinking’—a song from Dylan’s Christian period (hardly in collusion with China’s communist government) which includes the lyrics ‘so much oppression / can't keep track of it no more’. Or that CCTV, China’s major state-owned television broadcaster played ‘Blowin’ In The Wind’ over its news story about the concert.

It is telling that half a century after Dylan wrote ‘Blowin’ In The Wind’ there is a feeling that it is somehow his duty to speak out against the government by performing it, as though Dylan’s cultural position remains unchanged from the early 1960s, when even then he never sought to be a leader.

Eric Clapton, Nine Inch Nails, Avril Lavigne, Sonic Youth, Linkin Park and The Yeah Yeah Yeahs have all played China, without any expectation that they would use their position as a platform for political comment. Dylan, however, is held to a different standard, and remains imprisoned by the notion that he is, in his own words, ‘the Big Bubba of Rebellion, High Priest of Protest, the Czar of Dissent, the Duke of Disobedience’.

Throughout his life Dylan has largely been controversial only when his words or deeds smacked of acceptability, when he does anything that suggests he might not be the constantly protesting mouthpiece many still consider him to be. For a figure as influential as he is, the career moves that were deemed unacceptable by his fans and followers were those that suggested he was behaving in a way that would be perfectly acceptable for most ordinary, or high-profile, Americans.

His 1964 album ‘Another Side of Bob Dylan’ caused a stir because he wrote songs of a personal nature, rather than protest songs, and his infamous switch to playing electric music in 1965 angered his fans because they perceived him as bowing to the influence of the commercial hit parade. His shift soon after from psychedelic rocker to laid-back country musician was likewise seen as a step towards conformity.

Though Dylan has always proved changeable and volatile throughout his career, one period that continues to be shunned by many fans is his ‘Christian period’ of 1979-1981. It must have seemed as though Dylan was mocking the faith that had built up around him as the leader of the protest movement, and perversely, his iconoclasm was now in the service of the Lord. Dylan was now trying to persuade his followers to change with him, and for many, this was too much to ask. Ironically though, Dylan had long been considered a spokesperson or even prophet, and only in the Christian period did he actively don that mantle, both in the lyrics and in the evangelical polemics he delivered between songs at concerts.

Today what many find unacceptable about a Dylan concert is that he is a 73-year-old touring singer and active songwriter—and he acts like it.

For the first time in history the world is confronting something strange and unnerving—the ageing rock star. While the music of the stars of the late 1950s and ‘60s continues to be rediscovered and fetishised, the folk that produced the work (or at least those that survived the excesses of their heyday) are now entering a period of their lives that seems antithetical to the youthful enthusiasm and rebellion their music represented.

In 1965 Roger Daltrey may have sung Pete Townshend’s lyric of hoping to ‘die before I get old,’ but both men were still around to play the song at the 2012 London Olympic Games (of course, other members of their band were sadly lost along the way).

The Rolling Stones still perform exuberant, powerful concerts—but they largely rely on a decades-old image and reputation to ensure they remain profitable and valuable. Unlike Bob, if you see the Stones, and squint a bit, and use your imagination, it’s a rough approximation of the lads in their prime. But is this artistic Brigadoon appropriate or sustainable?

A perennial criticism of a concert by any popular musician from a previous era is that they either played too many new songs, or that their old songs didn’t sound the same as they used to. Perhaps as a direct result of this Leonard Cohen, Dylan’s main rival for the title of Poet Laureate of rock and roll, performs concerts that are choreographed to be a trip down memory lane, with scripted banter and a barely changing set list. As a result, whether you see Cohen in New York, Tokyo or Sydney, from year to year, you see a near-identical, carefully contrived exercise in nostalgia. In his recent book Retromania, Simon Reynolds writes that ‘the problem is not the advancing years of the artists, but the fact that the nostalgia market doesn’t allow bands to advance beyond music of their youth’.

What do we expect decades later from the purveyors of a culture that was, at the core of its aesthetic, disposable? It seems whenever an act from a previous era comes out, there is an expectation that will play the track list from the greatest hits CD, the exact way they played it originally. Dylan doesn’t do that. Boy, does he not do that.

If you go and see Dylan expecting him to sound exactly like his did in decades past, you’re going to be disappointed. You have to be prepared for the fact that he’ll play classics— it’s just that they’ll have new arrangements that represent his current musical style—along with new material.
post #53163 of 57112

Yay my napoli jacket has arrived - snuck it in just before our workshop shut for summer break!

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

PJ Napoli (new workshop)

Cloth: Loro Piana "The Lightest" Navy blazer weave 175g (my shirt today is 188g Thomas mason - so this is lighter than most shirt cloths!)

Setup: 3-r-2 notch, patch pockets, completely unstructured, smoked MOP buttons, doppio impuntura and milanese style buttonholes 

 

 

post #53164 of 57112
Nice one Romp.
post #53165 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdEyedPugilist View Post

Cockpit USA jackets seem like a good deal, Fox.

Any experience?

I've done a bit of research. Thefedoralounge is a fantastic resource.

Most on the forum don't like the Cockpit USA - apparently they have a more updated, looser fit. US Wings is held in a similar regard.

Most of the love goes to Aero Leather, G&B, Good Leather and the Real McCoy.

Us Authentic Leather Co appears to be the Loake 1880 of the jacket world, which is generally regarded as entry level despite some hate from the perfectionists.

Cooper A2s are also supposed to be decent, but they seem to be extant.

Feel free to correct me if I'm off.
post #53166 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

I've done a bit of research. Thefedoralounge is a fantastic resource.
.

post #53167 of 57112
Oli - I think you might have found your spiritual home over on Fed Lounge.

I assume for the jacket funds you have a envelope / brown paper bag of a few Gs of those big gold pineapples from Jeff McCloy or Tinkler
post #53168 of 57112
Newcastle is awash with cash at present so why not go for one of these http://www.selfedge.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=647

Forgot Oli has the wrong party affiliation.
post #53169 of 57112

Romp that looks sic.

 

I went to races on Wednesday, am still recovering. Drank from 11 in the morning to 7 the next morning. Spent a lot of money...just drinks and cabs tho, didn't gamble. Was pretty fun, nice seeing the girls get all dressed up. Some pretty terrible outfits tho. Saw maybe 2 SF type fits? This was the Ekka races though, so it seems to be a very young crowd.

 

Lots of cheap, too large polyester suits with white Dragon sunglasses etc. I have not yet closely inspected my clothes for damage, but I really only started getting boozed from about 12 at night onwards and they looked to be in decent nick. Second wear for a thrifted pair of loafers too, but they are unscuffed which is nice.

post #53170 of 57112

Quote:

Originally Posted by lukejackson View Post
 

Romp that looks sic.

 

I went to races on Wednesday, am still recovering. Drank from 11 in the morning to 7 the next morning. Spent a lot of money...just drinks and cabs tho, didn't gamble. Was pretty fun, nice seeing the girls get all dressed up. Some pretty terrible outfits tho. Saw maybe 2 SF type fits? This was the Ekka races though, so it seems to be a very young crowd.

 

Lots of cheap, too large polyester suits with white Dragon sunglasses etc. I have not yet closely inspected my clothes for damage, but I really only started getting boozed from about 12 at night onwards and they looked to be in decent nick. Second wear for a thrifted pair of loafers too, but they are unscuffed which is nice.

 

Good stuff, I was there for a while, indeed a younger crowd and as usual lots of poor fits and choices.  I don't necessarily hold that against them though as by the end of the races - let alone the end of the day - it can be messy, not sure i'd want to wear a nice outfit if I intended to get it on either.  Always good to see the ladies dressed up though.

 

I went for a spring look with a lighter navy suit, HC peach linen tie, burgundy carminas.  Lots of love for that tie as usual :) 

post #53171 of 57112

Sounds nice @Osiris2012. I ended up at the beat in the valley :embar:

post #53172 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukejackson View Post

Romp that looks sic.
I went to races on Wednesday, am still recovering. Drank from 11 in the morning to 7 the next morning. Spent a lot of money...just drinks and cabs tho, didn't gamble.
I'm impressed - nice effort* - brings back memories.

I meant to say you should have a bet or two - for increased fun - bet say $5 on 3 favourites for a place every race and the extreme outsider for a win. Thats $20 a race X 8 = $160 and you are sure to get some of it back.

* none of this should be taken as encouraging the irresponsible consumption - let alone enjoyment - of drugs and alcohol.
post #53173 of 57112
Anyone know of someone that can chain stitch hem denim in Melbourne? I've always sent my denim up to Mikhail, but wouldn't mind a local option. Very happy with Mikhail's work though
post #53174 of 57112
Anyone here go to the last Cleverley trunk show? Any advice/thoughts on the process of selecting a MTO shoe?
post #53175 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by suttonzach View Post

Anyone here go to the last Cleverley trunk show? Any advice/thoughts on the process of selecting a MTO shoe?

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/376216/the-thread-for-discussing-bespeaking-bespoke-shoes

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