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Australian Members - Page 3447

post #51691 of 56086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post
 

ya - me in my beige linen below

 

we have white, oatmeal, beige, brown, navy, black and a few more Italian linen 300g/sq 

 

I can source Irish linen via Ariston too however i personally think too heavy for Aus

Nice suit, good shirt, excellent collar! 

 

*Edit: Oh and compliments or something...

post #51692 of 56086
FYI - Herringbone Sydney popup

https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/152156

Pop-Up Herringbone store opened today next to NAB Branch at 345 George Street Sydney, offering up to 70% off everything. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Plenty of boxes of shirts, good variety of styles and sizes. Boxes are replenished often so currently plenty of stock. Includes some Boston Brothers shirts too.
Not so many suits/jackets/trousers etc.
Asked how long they expected to be open, to which they said 2-4 weeks.

Men's

Shirts $60
Ties $45
Suits $400
Jackets $150
Trousers and Chinos $75
Knits $65
Cufflinks $50
Belts $40
Boxers $20

If anyone heads down, I would be interested in a proxy for size 40 knits, and maybe a 40 jacket. PM me if you do, please.
post #51693 of 56086
re Zegna and a sheep station.

I'd assume that Zegna want a bit more control and to use the station as a testing round for various innovations or experiments. They will be able to play around and see whether (wether. hehe) any vertical integration has some benefits. They will also have control over issues like mulesing. Its generally underestimated here how much impact the coverage of mulesing has had in other countries and impact on wool manufacturers. Zegna has eased back on some Australian events due to mulesing and lack of action, and bullshit, by industry bodies here. Owning a property will allow them to have a proper look at mulseing and alternatives instead of relying on industry spin.

The advances in achieving lower micron wool will also allow Zegna to experiment in this area. There is the possibility that low micron wool can substitute for a lot of the cashmere etc industry which is already under some sustainability pressures.

The Australian Wool industry bodies and political organizations have been the growers worst enemy over the years and caused immense damage to Australia's image and trade in higher value wool. The idiotically managed floor price years (decades) and subsequent too little too late adjustments caused many byers and nations, Japan and Italy and UK in particular, to lose trust in the industry here. A trust that hasn't really been regained.

I wont mention the fact that despite being the worlds largest producer of fine wool by a very very wide margin and the billions of taxpayer $ poured in to prop up the wool industry over the years we still have a mining dig it up and ship it in bulk attitude to wool and still have not managed to have a fledgling value add industry in wool.

The industry should be thankful that Zegna even bothered to invest here and not say put the money into South American wool production and tell the Australian wool rent seeking industry to sing Waltzing Matilda and go jump in the billabong.
post #51694 of 56086
lachy - for a minute I thought you said NAB was offering 70% off everything!
post #51695 of 56086
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

re Zegna and a sheep station.

I wont mention the fact that despite being the worlds largest producer of fine wool by a very very wide margin and the billions of taxpayer $ poured in to prop up the wool industry over the years we still have a mining dig it up and ship it in bulk attitude to wool and still have not managed to have a fledgling value add industry in wool.

So do you reckon there's a possibility that we (the royal 'we' that is) could successfully produce and export woven cloth to not only local markets, but the world generally?

 

I'd imagine dyeing and weaaving (is that even the word in these technological times) machinery comes with a large initial capital investment, and perhaps a low ongoing labour cost if current automation trends in other manufacturing industries are anything to go by (looking at European manufacturers here). I suppose one would need a volume commitment for a number of years to ensure the initial return on the capital investment (to ensure financing could be obtained). And definitely located in a country area to keep rents low... Or just set up in middle Asia somewhere with cheap land, power and labour and not have to worry about losing the house!

post #51696 of 56086

Epic post of high quality FHX,

post #51697 of 56086

Saying hello from Nth QLD, in Australia. 

 

 

Cheers

Nik

post #51698 of 56086
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggett View Post

So do you reckon there's a possibility that we (the royal 'we' that is) could successfully produce and export woven cloth to not only local markets, but the world generally?

I'd imagine dyeing and weaaving (is that even the word in these technological times) machinery comes with a large initial capital investment, and perhaps a low ongoing labour cost if current automation trends in other manufacturing industries are anything to go by (looking at European manufacturers here). I suppose one would need a volume commitment for a number of years to ensure the initial return on the capital investment (to ensure financing could be obtained). And definitely located in a country area to keep rents low... Or just set up in middle Asia somewhere with cheap land, power and labour and not have to worry about losing the house!
Not here, well not anymore.

When I was with Fletcher Jones some 10+ years back now the then owner Ted Dimmick (now deceased) owned some of the last remaining mills in Australia to do essentially the same thing, control the process etc (no idea where the wool was farmed though). This is when stuff was still made in Warnambool too so less miles sending wool/fabric around the place. Costs were too high in the end and it's likely cheaper to actually weave it somewhere like Italy and have a brand name like VBC or whatever attached to the cloth..
post #51699 of 56086
Aside from some potential for niche high tech fabric manufacturing for parachutes, racing sails etc. (low volume, manufacturing-on-demand is probably the most sustainable model even here) the textile industry in Aus is, sadly, as good as dead I think.
post #51700 of 56086

Why would you bother? its a low skill industry and wool is on the decline. 

 

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bushtelegraph/wool-growing-in-decline/5562718

post #51701 of 56086
"...And the Lord said unto the shepherd:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
'piss off this is cattle country'
post #51702 of 56086

How are the following shoes for work. I've had them for years, but never needed them.

Photo (Click to show)

 

 

If they're a no go. What would people recommend for $150-200 max.

post #51703 of 56086

If you don't need them why replace them?

 

You won't get decent shoes at that price range - you're in that no mans land of corrected grain and chipboard. 

 

You're better to shoot for a pair of Loake 1880s from Herring Shoes or Meermins RTW range at $300. 

 

If money is short, you're better to buy 2-3 pairs of relatively plain British-made shoes than 6+ 'look at moi' ones.


Edited by Oli2012 - 7/9/14 at 4:36am
post #51704 of 56086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post
 

If you don't need them why replace them?

I'm starting a job where a suit is required. Therefore need black shoes.

post #51705 of 56086
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickjersey View Post
 

I'm starting a job where a suit is required. Therefore need black shoes.

 

Ah. 

 

They'd work, but a decent pair of black cap oxfords and brown brogues* would work much better. 

 

 

*To all those SFers out there I know this isn't their technical term but it may as well be as far as the general public is concerned.

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