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Australian Members - Page 311

post #4651 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post
^^ What makes you think he was a SF member? Did he ask you to take a photo of him so he could post it on the Internet?

Only if he insisted that photo be taken in a toilet.
post #4652 of 57112
Quote:
The Australia Institute asked consumers which of the following products they thought had the biggest mark-up.

Product type Response

Cosmetics and perfume 21%
Fresh food 19%
Clothes and shoes 19%
Electronic goods 15%
Furniture 5%
Sports and leisure goods 5%
DVDs and music 5%
Books 3%
Not sure 9%
Total 100%

Source:The Australia Institute
Advertisement: Story continues below



ABS data shows which products really have the biggest mark-ups.

Product average mark-up by type

Product type Average mark-up
Clothes and shoes 142%
Other manufactured products 97%
Electrical and electronic goods 85%
Furniture 76%
Books newspapers and magazines 52%
Fresh food 47%
DVDs and music 40%
All goods wholesale or retail mark- up 65%

Source:Australia Bureau of Statistics data, The Australia Institute

From THE AGE

For many goods, though, the retailer's take is often much higher than you think.

"In reality, the average mark-up for items such as clothes and shoes is 142 per cent, and around 40 per cent for popular online items like DVDs and music," said Richard Denniss, executive director of the Australia Institute.

The boom in online retailing is well known, with the rise of the Australian dollar over the past year often cited as the main culprit as shoppers find cheaper goods accessible on overseas websites.

Less understood, though, is how Australia's high-cost retail sector is going to accelerate the flight to online shopping.

According the institute's report, The Rise and Rise of Online Retail, a tin of Heinz baked beans costs 59 pence in a Sainsbury's store in London, but $1.88 - equivalent to £1.23 - in a Woolworth's in Perth.

Other instances include: a pair of Camper Peu leather casual shoes costs $US170 in the New York Camper store, compared with $290 - or $US305 - in Melbourne.

Those price differences aren't necessarily price gouging on the part of the retailer, the report finds, but the result of Australia's high rental prices and staff costs. The conclusion, though, is that those costs aren't shared by online rivals, so the shift to internet shopping is only likely to quicken.
post #4653 of 57112
Quote:
The threat of internet retailing to department stores and other fashion outlets has been around for more than a decade, but the threat is fast becoming a reality.

A confluence of factors, including a strong currency, more choice from overseas online sites, increased broadband penetration, continuing comfort in relation to online payment and relatively cheaper products, are all contributing to the migration to online shopping.

The categories most exposed are books, electronics, cosmetics, department stores, clothing and footwear. Not surprisingly, companies such as Myer, Pacific Brands, Harvey Norman and David Jones have been taking a whipping on the ASX.

To put it into perspective, the premium cosmetics market generates about $1.3 billion of sales, with David Jones and Myer estimated to hold 60 per cent of that. In a report last year, Deutsche Bank estimated that cosmetics generate about 15 per cent of department store sales and 25 per cent of gross profit, reflecting the high gross margins in this category.

What is so important about cosmetics is they add more value to department stores through the customers they draw, hence their location at the ground-floor entrance.

Online cosmetics are growing at 30 per cent a year, with up to 5 per cent of market share in the US. With a proliferation of cosmetic sites such as strawberrynet.com and essentialdayspa.com in the US and Canada, more and more Australian women are taking the online cosmetic plunge.

It is not hard to see why. Australian recommended retail prices on premium cosmetics are among the world's highest, with US prices averaging 30 per cent lower. The stronger dollar, the wider choice and the lure of gifts and free postage are making it compelling. In a report this month, Patersons retail analyst Russell Wright warned that the surge in online shopping poses a serious risk to the businesses of all retailers in Australia.

Read More in THE AGE article.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/on...523-1f0ov.html
post #4654 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
Made in Egypt and I am sure that the "made by hand" is an absolute load of rubbish - although, of course, the sewing machine that made the shirts was operated by someone's hands...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Archibald Longfellow View Post
I don't think using a sewing machine disqualifies you from saying it was handmade. My partner makes clothes using a sewing machine and I'd call them handmade.

I think the point is that it's not mass produced on a factory production line where it's hardly touched by human hands at all


I take your point, but using that definition, pretty much all clothing could be termed "made by hand", even though it's a $5 t-shirt from Target.

Of course, just because a shirt is machine-stitched doesn't make it bad - most English shirts are fully machine-stitched but they are very nice and well-made.

Nonetheless, I think that it's pretty clear that R&B is using "made by hand" in this sense to impart a sense of refinery to their clothes, despite the fact that they are fully machine-stitched and that there's no handwork in their shirts as there is with Borrelli or Finamore, for example.
post #4655 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Presto87 View Post
Gents,

Looking to purchase a pair of (preferably brown) loafers in SYD. Any recommendations?! Had no luck thus far unfortunately ...

What size are you? I have a pair of new 9.5AU/10.5 US/43.5EUR Stefano Branchinis.
post #4656 of 57112
Popped out of the office today in between meetings to head back to the Grenson's store next door to my hotel and picked up these puppies. I am now done shopping wise - although I will need to pick up something for the girlfriend.
post #4657 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnsNotHere View Post
Herringbone have the C&J Sydney I believe

Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
As noted above, Herringbone stock some C&J loafers. I'm sure that places like Harrolds would also stock some, but I'm equally sure that they will be horrendously expensive!

Cheers for the reminder gents! Had seen previously on their summer catalogue - unfortunately their (relatively) new online store doesn't display C&J shoes. Will need to make a trip in.
post #4658 of 57112
Can any Melbournites recommend a place to buy a Docklands-proof umbrella? Needs to withstand wind gusts > 50kph and handle driving rain coming in at right angles.
post #4659 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post
Can any Melbournites recommend a place to buy a Docklands-proof umbrella? Needs to withstand wind gusts > 50kph and handle driving rain coming in at right angles.

You probably will have to go to the Swaine Adenney step. A few have been traded recently around B&W.
post #4660 of 57112
Has anyone tried RM Williams jeans?
post #4661 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
Has anyone tried RM Williams jeans?

A mate of mine wears them, swears by them, claims they fit the same as moleskins, however he went to buy some recently and all they had was an acid wash look. So he passed and has gone back to Levis.
post #4662 of 57112
RM William jeans sound like dad jeans :S

I am interested in one of their croc card cases though
post #4663 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
From THE AGE

For many goods, though, the retailer's take is often much higher than you think.

"In reality, the average mark-up for items such as clothes and shoes is 142 per cent, and around 40 per cent for popular online items like DVDs and music," said Richard Denniss, executive director of the Australia Institute.

The boom in online retailing is well known, with the rise of the Australian dollar over the past year often cited as the main culprit as shoppers find cheaper goods accessible on overseas websites.

Less understood, though, is how Australia's high-cost retail sector is going to accelerate the flight to online shopping.

According the institute's report, The Rise and Rise of Online Retail, a tin of Heinz baked beans costs 59 pence in a Sainsbury's store in London, but $1.88 - equivalent to £1.23 - in a Woolworth's in Perth.

Other instances include: a pair of Camper Peu leather casual shoes costs $US170 in the New York Camper store, compared with $290 - or $US305 - in Melbourne.

Those price differences aren't necessarily price gouging on the part of the retailer, the report finds, but the result of Australia's high rental prices and staff costs. The conclusion, though, is that those costs aren't shared by online rivals, so the shift to internet shopping is only likely to quicken.
Heard about this on the wireless this morning - good pick up fxh. Might do something to counter the "fair playing field" arguments the big retailers make with regards to online shopping..... how is a 142% markup "fair"?

Also - I'll add it isn't necessarily all the retailer's fault - Frank Lowy didn't exactly make his millions by giving away store space......
post #4664 of 57112
Whats annoying is that all those markups don't translate to better customer service.

I ordered a shirt from Rhodes and Beckett where they say the order would arrive within forty eight hours, but it's been three working days already and it still hasn't shipped.

The first time I tried to signup an online account it didn't work. The second time I tried, I was logged in as some random fellow in Melbourne. I could see his name, address and order history.

Now every time I log on to check the status of my own order, it says I ordered two shirts instead of one, but at least my card wasn't overcharged.

Incompetent.
post #4665 of 57112
Hey Guys

For anyone thinking of using Katolan as a Proxy, I have and they were a pleasure to deal with. Also received goods from Malford too.

Unfortunately, I specified the wrong size so if anyone is chasing a BNWT RLX Golf Sport Navy Polo in Large let me know!

Cheers
Kris
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