or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Australian Members - Page 3041

post #45601 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

One of the things which would reduce me to want to scream was hearing 20 something APS graduates carry on about how they should be higher up the food chain WTF they have no corporate knowledge or understanding of the culture but hey they should be boss, FTFAJ

The only thing worse was 35 yo bitching that they should be Directors, yeah right.
If they're old enough they're good enough.

Trouble is they are rarely good enough.
post #45602 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

If they're old enough they're good enough.

Trouble is they are rarely good enough.

First sentence totally incorrect .

Second correct.

What is annoying is that they lack the corporate and cultural capital but carry on as if their genius material.
post #45603 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

Anyway, if I were a practising lawyer I wouldn't be too worried about the raw number of annual law grads as many of them will probably never actually work in the legal profession, at least not for much of their careers.

 

not entirely accurate. the way i see it is this - if there is an overwhelming number of lawyers who actually practice in law after graduating (which there is), there becomes an oversupply, meaning the number of potential clients one solicitor would have, would be diminishing due to more solicitors competing for work. 

 

the thing that really drives me up the wall with law faculties are, they hand out degrees like candy; for 'disadvantaged' universities, they have a quota of 'disadvantaged' students (usually a generous number) they must pass, irrespective of whether the marks of the students are passes or not. this only means the prestige law degrees are being diluted, whilst adding unnecessary numbers to the profession. the amount of incompetent lawyers i've seen at court... including some who can barely understand english, really vexes me. 

 

end rant.

post #45604 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post


If your going to reread Gibson start with Neuromancer. I read the Patten Recognition trilogy last year.

 

I have Neuromancer, ML Overdrive and the third sitting on the 'to read' pile.

 

Unfortunately, All Tomorrow's Parties was just way more enjoyable than Neuromancer, although I read it maybe 4-5 years ago, so NM is due for a re-read.

post #45605 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliq View Post
 

 

not entirely accurate. the way i see it is this - if there is an overwhelming number of lawyers who actually practice in law after graduating (which there is), there becomes an oversupply, meaning the number of potential clients one solicitor would have, would be diminishing due to more solicitors competing for work. 

 

the thing that really drives me up the wall with law faculties are, they hand out degrees like candy; for 'disadvantaged' universities, they have a quota of 'disadvantaged' students (usually a generous number) they must pass, irrespective of whether the marks of the students are passes or not. this only means the prestige law degrees are being diluted, whilst adding unnecessary numbers to the profession. the amount of incompetent lawyers i've seen at court... including some who can barely understand english, really vexes me. 

 

end rant.

 

I started practicing almost a decade ago now, and honestly it was the same then.  I got my practicing certificate by way of the Leo Cussens course, back when that was the only way if you didn't have an "in" to get an articled clerkship, and some of the other people in the Leos course made me wonder how on Earth they'd got a degree in anything let alone law.  If you struggled to complete the Leos course, which was extremely easy, you really had no business trying to get a law job.

 

In my experience, though, there are plenty of very poor quality senior lawyers as well, and a lot of the problem with the entry level lawyers is a cutback in training and with firms using poorly paid juniors to do stuff they don't have the experience to do (and, I reluctantly acknowledge, an issue with lawyers whose main qualification is speaking the language of their clients more than any legal ability).  The most mind-boggling case of bad advice I've seen recently, which ended up costing the other side a shedload in costs and in paying some of our client's costs once they ditched the original lawyer and engaged someone sensible who told them they had no case whatsoever, was by a middle-aged allegedly experienced sole practitioner.

 

I feel sorry for all the new law graduates these days who are being sold on getting a law degree when there's just not jobs in law for anything like all these kids.  I wonder how many even get practicing certificates.

post #45606 of 57117
I go to one of those 'disadvantaged' universities, more for reasons of geography rather than grades.

Newcastle is a woeful university, but not for the reasons discussed here. The course has long been fused with the PLT program, which has a lot of support from the local bar and practitioners. Back in the day it was normal for students to pick up jobs at local firms through placement in the program.

That's not the case anymore - the cohort has doubled twice since my year and there's simply not enough space locally to pick up experience and work. In an attempt to improve the uni's poor rankings, the dean has cut contact hours out of the program so staff can spend more time on research. Eventually the PLT will go, as the full time solicitors employed to run the program reduce the ratio of research per staff member.

I find it really disappointing. For me, I've learnt more on the job than I ever have at university - all the soft skills like who is who at the local bar, client interviewing, mediation, how to write advices effectively and a rudimentary understanding of how to meet a budget. It feels like the university lost one of it's few redeeming features.

/rant
post #45607 of 57117
i think slim charles' quote from the wire pretty accurately applies sums up grad recruitment in the legal industry today:
                 "the game's the same, just got more fierce"
 
having said that, the fact that there are more law grads just scraping through their degrees at average universities should have a negligible effect on your average student's chances of getting hired. 
 
post #45608 of 57117
I don't think this is an issue that only applies to law. So many professions are flooded with incompetent people that are self entitled, that's why we can earn so much. Honestly if you are good at what you do I wouldn't worry.

On 'disadvantaged' law schools, I was under the impression Newcastle had quite a good one, a friend of mine is a judge and couldn't speak highly enough of it. Only ask as my partner has finished her BA and is about to enroll in law, Newcastle is close ANU was also on the radar but would be via distance.
post #45609 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyHoffa View Post
 

Keeping in line with the positive and friendly attitude laid down by other members of this thread, I have to say that your question is superficial. There is no such thing as a 'perfectly fitted jacket' as perfection is not possible, hence it is impossible to answer you question.

 

Acquiescence! Dropping the big words!

 

QED

post #45610 of 57117
What I don't understand is why it has to be a double degree. Why isn't it either a straight 4 or 5 year degree?
post #45611 of 57117
Just wanna put my thumbs up for the 520 jean. Discontinued but I've got a pair from my brother. Great tapered fit.


Edited by iSurg - 2/15/14 at 5:38pm
post #45612 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

What I don't understand is why it has to be a double degree. Why isn't it either a straight 4 or 5 year degree?

More revenue for universities. Also in the spirit of encouraging flexibility and diversity, rather than focus and discipline.
post #45613 of 57117
Swinburne is pretty great for Computer Science. I have been quite impressed by the programming course material and tutors.
post #45614 of 57117

Hung out at Fletcher Jones today - while the factory's gone, it's taken up by a very sizable vintage market.

 

If the menswear was anywhere near as extensive as the womenswear I'd be set for life.

 

As it stands I'll head back next week and have a proper rummage - I already found a few gems with just a quick peek.

post #45615 of 57117
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

Hung out at Fletcher Jones today - while the factory's gone, it's taken up by a very sizable vintage market.

If the menswear was anywhere near as extensive as the womenswear I'd be set for life.

As it stands I'll head back next week and have a proper rummage - I already found a few gems with just a quick peek.

Good to hear that the place is still being used.

How were the gardens surrounding the site? I remember that they used to be quite well-known and very well-tended, at least when the FJ's factory was still being used to make clothing.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members