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Australian Members - Page 2719

post #40771 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stiva View Post

OK GN, you win on the strength of the C&Js and the Carminas. I should have said, "Most Derbys are fucken ugly, especially split toes, and Corthays are overpriced tat for Francophile spivs with size 6 feet".
The last bit might be so but theres nothing wrong at all with an open laced shoe.

Split toes with apron is about the only thing I contemplate "needing"
post #40772 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post


Split toes with apron is about the only thing I contemplate "needing"

Especially when GN goes around flaunting his Dovers.
post #40773 of 53716
Stuff I'm reading
Quote:
Fashion plays not only with time (with revivals, vintage styles, and so on) but also with the spatial structure of clothes, which provides an inexhaustible source of innovation. An analysis of daily rituals of dress reveals some of the habits and gestures that mediate and translate the fashion world into the domestic sphere. The practices of use and the domestication process of fashion items have been largely neglected in the past. However, these provide inspiration for rethinking fashion in another perspective. Gestures, in particular, are important in terms of understanding the usability and the affordances of fashion items in everyday life, not only the marketing strategies of fashion brands. For example, the Dior campaign to launch the Dior Touchphone described the traditional seven gestures representative of the Dior universe: to dress, undress, wear makeup, look, walk, sit, and descend a staircase. To these, an eighth gesture must be added: to call, using one’s new Touchphone. Investigating the spatial metaphors that govern and regulate the fashion world is promising, because these metaphors make the relationships among the human body, society, and fashion intelligible and increase the awareness of the symbolic meaning of the vestimentary order and fashion shapes.
post #40774 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post


I must have missed something when did Oz become a suburb of the USA?

 

About 68 years ago.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stiva View Post

They're not Derbys. They're overpriced tat for Francophile spivs with size 6 feet.

 

If you're going to troll, may as well do the job properly! :rotflmao:

 

 

In other news, just received these today, having ordered them back in June from Gentleman's Footwear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carmina lizard monk-straps on the Rain last. Overpriced* tat for this Ophiophile spiv.

 

 

*Not really. Great value in fact.

post #40775 of 53716
Quote:
It’s 1927 and Ian Fleming, age 19, climbs off a train in the small Tyrolean town of Kitzbühel. He’s under a cloud: you can almost see it, small and discolored, parked a foot or so above his head, intermittently shedding rain. Fleming moves gracefully, but there is a sense of encumbrance about him, a kind of private sluggishness or surliness of mood. In his face—austere brow, thick-lidded eyes, bruiser’s nose, prissy mouth—severity blends with the instincts of the pleasure-seeker, the lotus-eater: a sadist’s face, really. Fleming has been dispatched to these mountains by his mother (“M,” as he sometimes calls her) because he’s made a mess of his education back in England. Shuffled out of Eton for some small scandal, he has more recently exited, under his little cloud, the officer’s academy at Sandhurst. Now he is entering the maternally mandated care of a British couple named Forbes Dennis, progressive educators and acolytes of the Viennese psychiatrist Alfred Adler. During the next four years, under the guidance of the Forbes Dennises, Fleming will move from Kitzbühel to Munich to Geneva, inhaling as he goes the headiest drafts of High Europe: Rilke, Kafka, Arthur Schnitzler, and the fathers of psychoanalysis. In due course, he will receive written permission from Carl Jung to translate one of the great man’s lectures, a disquisition on the alchemist and doctor Paracelsus. And 26 years later, he’ll sit down in his Jamaican villa and type The scent and smoke and sweat of a casino are nauseating at three in the morning.

Was James Bond—neck-snapper, escape artist, serial shagger—the last repudiation of his creator’s cultural pedigree? Take that, fancy books; take that, whiskered shrinks. I, Ian Fleming, give you a hero almost without psychology: a bleak circuit of appetites, sensations, and prejudices, driven by a mechanical imperative called “duty.” In Jungian-alchemical terms, 007 is like lead, the metal associated with the dark god Saturn, lying coldly at the bottom of the crucible and refusing transformation. Boil him, slash him, poison him, flog him with a carpet beater and shoot his woman—Bond will not be altered.
post #40776 of 53716
Quote:
 It’s 1927 and Ian Fleming, age 19, climbs off a train in the small Tyrolean town of Kitzbühel. He’s under a cloud: you can almost see it, small and discolored, parked a foot or so above his head, intermittently shedding rain. Fleming moves gracefully, but there is a sense of encumbrance about him, a kind of private sluggishness or surliness of mood. In his face—austere brow, thick-lidded eyes, bruiser’s nose, prissy mouth—severity blends with the instincts of the pleasure-seeker, the lotus-eater: a sadist’s face, really. Fleming has been dispatched to these mountains by his mother (“M,” as he sometimes calls her) because he’s made a mess of his education back in England. Shuffled out of Eton for some small scandal, he has more recently exited, under his little cloud, the officer’s academy at Sandhurst. Now he is entering the maternally mandated care of a British couple named Forbes Dennis, progressive educators and acolytes of the Viennese psychiatrist Alfred Adler. During the next four years, under the guidance of the Forbes Dennises, Fleming will move from Kitzbühel to Munich to Geneva, inhaling as he goes the headiest drafts of High Europe: Rilke, Kafka, Arthur Schnitzler, and the fathers of psychoanalysis. In due course, he will receive written permission from Carl Jung to translate one of the great man’s lectures, a disquisition on the alchemist and doctor Paracelsus. And 26 years later, he’ll sit down in his Jamaican villa and type The scent and smoke and sweat of a casino are nauseating at three in the morning.

Was James Bond—neck-snapper, escape artist, serial shagger—the last repudiation of his creator’s cultural pedigree? Take that, fancy books; take that, whiskered shrinks. I, Ian Fleming, give you a hero almost without psychology: a bleak circuit of appetites, sensations, and prejudices, driven by a mechanical imperative called “duty.” In Jungian-alchemical terms, 007 is like lead, the metal associated with the dark god Saturn, lying coldly at the bottom of the crucible and refusing transformation. Boil him, slash him, poison him, flog him with a carpet beater and shoot his woman—Bond will not be altered.

 

I think I'd rather read Ian Fleming's stripped-down prose than this flowery twaddle. Nevertheless, somewhere in amongst all those rococo literary flourishes is a genuine conceit.

post #40777 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

About 68 years ago.

Sydney State Theatre 1943 over sexed over paid and over here.

Packed housei in a fug of cigarette smoke enjoying Bambi. Bambi cries out 'Mother, Mother where is my Mother?

From the gods a diggers voice booms out 'She's gone out with a bloody Yank love'

Theatre errupts in laughter.

Great shoes by the way.
post #40778 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Movember, anybody?

 

my asian genes have robbed me of any proper moustache/beard. 

post #40779 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

meister old chap - how many - what % - were wearing proper penguin suits?

Last time I wore one about 3 years ago, I was one of 3 , out of 20 at a BLACK TIE private dinner at the Australia Club. A year or so ago I was at two large dinners at Melbourne Club - private - Black Tie optional - I didn't wear one and only two out of 50 wore them. Not all wore ties.

I mention the clubs, not because I'm a member, I'm not, nor am I invited much, but to give the context - its hard to get much more formal, old school and establishment in Melbourne.

In fact I only know one bloke in real life (aside from forum idiots) who knows the "rules" and wears the full outfit - self tied tie, pumps etc. - nice guy too. Hes the Australia Club member.


Speaking of black tie, as I stepped out of my building this afternoon, a man in a single-breasted, shawl-lapel dinner suit walked past, wearing a black, self-tied bow tie. He looked very nice, barring the fact that with his well-cut dinner suit and self-tied bow tie, he was wearing... a pair of black RM Williams elastic-sided boots with rubber soles! butbut.gif
post #40780 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

About 68 years ago.


If you're going to troll, may as well do the job properly! rotflmao.gif


In other news, just received these today, having ordered them back in June from Gentleman's Footwear.















Carmina lizard monk-straps on the Rain last. Overpriced* tat for this Ophiophile spiv.

*Not really. Great value in fact.

That toecap ruins them entirely and the buckle is too big in proportion IMO. Sorry to be so blunt.
post #40781 of 53716

Listening to Joey DeFrancesco carving up the Thelonious Monk classic "Evidence" on ABC jazz-FM.

 

Best. Head. Ever.

post #40782 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


That toecap ruins them entirely and the buckle is too big in proportion IMO. Sorry to be so blunt.

 

It looks like somebody's nightmare. 

post #40783 of 53716


I have the same exotic as a DM in the Simpson. They are so good for the price. Captoe works here. I quite like them so by extension, I like coxie's single monks. Saw these in the Paris store and had to have them. They are sex.

{Shoes need variety, Oli. At least Cox has the cahones to try something different. It's easy to be the critic and harder to be the critiqued.}
Edited by iSurg - 11/1/13 at 4:58am
post #40784 of 53716
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSurg View Post



I have the same exotic as a DM in the Simpson. They are so good for the price. Captoe works here. I quite like them so by extension, I like the single monks.

Shoes need variety, Oli.

These look great. Not something I would wear myself, same with the Derbys Gerry posted earlier - beautiful, but not for me.

Oh and iSurg, haven't you read Oli's posts - he is so minimalism he only wears one shoe (not even a pair) - black, because colour is excessive and slip on, because laces are time wasting and a frivolous accessory.
post #40785 of 53716
Cheers, PS. I know: Oli is our very own beloved aussie mafoofan. Without the Rubinacci or customed Hermes wallet. The Aussie one shoe is a RMW Chelsea, I guess.
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