or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Australian Members - Page 2713

post #40681 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Socks View Post

As someone who spend many happy years in Scotland guising (UK version of treat or trick - basic you perform a little act, liked reciting a poem, for sweets) I do not see how there can be an issue with kids dressing up and having fun.

 

One of the teachers at school actually said to me:

 

"Look, if the AMERICANS here want to have an AMERICAN party, that's OK, but not with Australians being forced to be involved."

 

It was seriously pathetic. He also doesn't know I'm American, so like, foot-in-mouth.

 

More celebrations = more fun. More fun = more better.

post #40682 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Is that the same as Guy Fawkes?

That's the chap. A Catholic that we can all admire.

As to Halloween being harmless in the US or the UK decades ago, well that was another country, decades ago, and in autumn, not spring. None of it makes any sense in an Australian context. We have our own cultural traditions and they are not being passed on; our kids get fed US culture instead.

I wouldn't mind so much if they were learning anything other than dress-ups and lollies when they do this. I bet not one kid could explain to you why people dress up as scary momsters on this particular night. If we must teach it in the schools, at least teach them something worthwhile..
post #40683 of 52467

Agreed. This should be compulsory viewing:

 

post #40684 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post


That's the chap. A Catholic that we can all admire.

As to Halloween being harmless in the US or the UK decades ago, well that was another country, decades ago, and in autumn, not spring. None of it makes any sense in an Australian context. We have our own cultural traditions and they are not being passed on; our kids get fed US culture instead.

I wouldn't mind so much if they were learning anything other than dress-ups and lollies when they do this. I bet not one kid could explain to you why people dress up as scary momsters on this particular night. If we must teach it in the schools, at least teach them something worthwhile..

 

CD - I think there's a tonne of assumptions in this post, and not a lot of them are necessarily useful. No one seems to mind UK traditions being passed down, despite their similar irrelevance (Easter and Christmas anyone? Not to mention Guy Fawkes day), but there's a haughtiness/arrogance that comes accross when US traditions (not only, but mainly) are adopted, or tried, by Australians that is permeating (to my reading anyway).

 

There's also a huge swathe of tradition vs contemporary culture and the place of each I'm umming and ahhing about talking to, but it's largely an irrelevant debate (ie, people largely cling to the traditions they're comfortable with and criticise the value/enjoyment people find in traditions/new experiences that are unusual or unnecessary).

 

For one, I've never experienced any teaching of Halloween (apart form explanations stemming from questions about it), although we did offer to host a Halloween social this year (again, the excuse to get people interested in being social), but due to low interest it was cancelled. In any case, I'd challenge that point on the grounds that singling out Halloween makes no sense: how many people can accurately talk about the origins of Christmas, Easter, Guy Fawkes day, even Labour day?? It seems a banal point....

 

FWIW, I don't really get Halloween, I don't particularly care for it (in the same way NYE has always been boring and dull to me), but far be it from me to tell other people how to enjoy their time. My Mum speaks with a lot of nostalgia for Halloween, so it'd be a bit two faced to recognise the enjoyment she clings on to still while denying to people seeking a similar level of enjoyment here, even if they don't really get there, even if it's not really 'us' (whatever that is).

post #40685 of 52467
Hey LM, maybe schoooling is lacking these days, but I can distictly remember being taught all about Easter Xmas and Guy Fawkes day - the story, the history, the reasons. But not halloween... perhaps it's some kind of inter-generational thing?

I know curriculums have changed over the years, but I don't understand why these sort of subjects are left off (given we seem to have precious little Australian traditions to fill the gap). Not trying to be a colonial apologist either - just reflecting on my upbringing more than anything I guess.

But I'm also of the school that can't fathom why computers have been shoved into class rooms over the past 10 years or so. It's not like the OSes these days are diffucult to use - if anything they're designed for dumb-asses to easily navigate their way around, hence it seems superfluous to use the argument that it's teaching kids to get ready for a world outside of education. But maybe I'm missing something...

Disclaimer: I don't have kids, hence no comprehension of what they allegedly need to make it in todays world - just a (nostalgic) reminisence of my upbringing and schooling and noting that despite the lack of computing access I can still cut it in today's computer infested world...
post #40686 of 52467

Yeah - what you said only makes sense form the POV of someone that hasn't actually worked around kids much at all.

 

I'm happy to go into depth if you want me to, otherwise I think you're probably able to realise it's nearly useless to look at a classroom from an adult's perspective and expect success.


Edited by LonerMatt - 10/31/13 at 3:33am
post #40687 of 52467

Trip post.

post #40688 of 52467

Trip post.

post #40689 of 52467
All I can say is, Halloween is not an Australian tradition, whereas the other feasts you mention have a history here going back hundreds of years. So what if they originated in the UK? Thye have been gere longer than this coutnry has existed. When I returned from the USA in 2004, celebrating Halloween was virtually unknown here. That's less than 10 years go.

Feasts like Chinese New Year and Diwali have been brought here by the ethnic groups that celebrate them, and are spreading into the Australian community from there.

Halloween is different. It's a manufactured event being foisted on us by commercial interests. It doesn't arise from the community, or anyone's tradition. It's crass commercialism and that's why i don't like it.
post #40690 of 52467
Repetitive TOPY discussions > Halloween.
post #40691 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

All I can say is, Halloween is not an Australian tradition, whereas the other feasts you mention have a history here going back hundreds of years. So what if they originated in the UK? Thye have been gere longer than this coutnry has existed. When I returned from the USA in 2004, celebrating Halloween was virtually unknown here. That's less than 10 years go.

Feasts like Chinese New Year and Diwali have been brought here by the ethnic groups that celebrate them, and are spreading into the Australian community from there.

Halloween is different. It's a manufactured event being foisted on us by commercial interests. It doesn't arise from the community, or anyone's tradition. It's crass commercialism and that's why i don't like it.

 

Ummm. so does Halloween?

 

While I'm similarly revolted by crass consumerist nonsense motivated by materialist sadists at the expense of anything wholesome, authentic or genuine, I can hear my neighbours having a party - there's nothing overtly materialistc, consumerist, commercial or surreal (and I mean that word in it's original usage) about their enjoyment they're having. While it bears little resemblence here (and in many parts of the USA, UK, Europe, etc) to it's original form, who cares? How many holidays look the same now compared to 200, 300, 400 years ago? Or even 10, as you said?

 

My point wasn't that the origins of traditions matters inherently (they don't), but more that we should concern ourselves with how they are actually lived out, and how they impact us as individuals, as communities, etc. In that space it's difficult to find any tradition that's entirely wholesome (I mean, Valentine's day is the most obvious target of misappropriate of emotion and manufactured commercial bullshit, Christmas is a close second, both of which I think are better discussion points for tradition/contempary/commercial clashes, let's not get started critising CNY or Diwali). As I mentioned before, I can rail about the absurdity of Valentine's day (or any holiday) until I pass out if it brings some people closer together (or any net positive) then, well, who am I to stomp on that?

 

Obviously we're having different experiences. When I was in school in 2004, no one did anything for Halloween. In 2013, now that I teach in a school, no one does anything for Halloween. I definitely only see certain subsections of Australia (neither group could fairly be called middle class), but at the same time I'd definitely refute the notion that Halloween celebration is abundant, or even dominant Australia wide.

 

Lastly, surely the community makes its own traditions? It's how we, collectively, identify and practice that identity - while we should critically question our own identity and how we feel/relate to it, if the newer generations want to dress up and identify more with that side of things, surely that's just change? It's inevitable, no? Its irksome when something is criticsed as not being Australian and having so little roots here (thanks for totally ignoring the US community in Australia) and then praising (as far as I read it) CNY and Diwali for 'speading into Australia'. Seriously? Double standard much?

 

 

post #40692 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Repetitive TOPY discussions > Halloween.

 

It's an hour past bed and I'm still refreshinge very 10 seconds.

 

Keen. Bean.

post #40693 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

Yeah - what you said only makes sense form the POV of someone that hasn't actually worked around kids much at all.

I'm happy to go into depth if you want me to, otherwise I think you're probably able to realise it's nearly useless to look at a classroom from an adult's perspective and expect success.

I agree with your last point there - did a subject in uni called Technology In Schools (4th year elective for an Eng Degree) and even that was, well... odd. Didn't help that I had a 14 or 15 year old girl telling me she had a crush on me (or that her friend did, can't recall)... totally didn't know what to make of that (avoid eye contact and don't engage seemed to work). There should be training for that shit!
post #40694 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggett View Post


I agree with your last point there - did a subject in uni called Technology In Schools (4th year elective for an Eng Degree) and even that was, well... odd.

 

TBH - we often find people have gradiose visions for the potential of technology in schools, but these visiosn usually don't account for the skills of the students (highly over-rated, consider how most people use computers until age 15/16), the skills of the teachers (none of which have necessary developed alongside technology), the logistics of computer use (if it takes 5-10 minutes to have everyone set up a computer than there's a serious issue, and with outdated hardware that's the reality), or the change in the way students/people learn using technology (people are vastly more likely to skim information rather than read it in depth when reading on a screen, for example).

 

There are definitely gems, and they're definitely becoming more frequent, but there's also a lot of snake oil, false promises, misunderstandings, and confusion.

 

The classroom is one of the places everyone has an opinion and idea about, but relatively few people seem to, forgive me, know what they are talking about.

post #40695 of 52467
Quote:
Originally Posted by nabilmust View Post

Actually, might have found the answer:

https://www.baldwindenim.com/product/the-reed-in-classic-no-7/

Nabil I doubt these will fit your legs.

Either way it's 15oz!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

MJ Bale News:
- New store opening in Brisbane
- Introduction of a new Cool Wool from the Woolmark Company

Anyone know about the Cool Wool thing?

It ain't got nothing on zegna cool effects cloth smile.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members