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Australian Members - Page 2696

post #40426 of 56343
firmin - I got that Indian cook book you recommended from library - seems good - been too sick to do anything yet.

One question - I don't do Indian all the time so can you tell me what is the basic , long life, cupboard of spices - essential - to have - and what are close substitutes for various items?
I think others might be interested too. We can (should) spoiler any long posts.
post #40427 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

firmin - I got that Indian cook book you recommended from library - seems good - been too sick to do anything yet.

One question - I don't do Indian all the time so can you tell me what is the basic , long life, cupboard of spices - essential - to have - and what are close substitutes for various items?
I think others might be interested too. We can (should) spoiler any long posts.

I have a great recipe for Jewish Penicillin cures any PM me if you want it.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I buy small amounts of spices and turn them over pretty quick, some people store them in the fridge never been my thing but dry spices will last a long time. Interesting fact is that you can by changing quantities and mixes do a lot of Moroccan spice mixes as well. The most basic spices are Turmeric, Cumin, Black Cumin, Coriander both fresh and dry, Ginger fresh and dry, Fennel some people prefer Star Anise tastes the same, Asafoetida ( dried Fennel bark the Haris use it as a replacement for garlic) the Thais call it Hing, Fenugreek a very distinctive aroma use sparingly, Amchur dried Mango powder, Cinnamon, Cardamon, Nutmeg, Dried Mustard seeds, Black Pepper, Sweet Paprika and of course Chillies.

I know that their are lot differences between North and South Indian cooking I think the south uses coconut milk correct me if I am wrong. Most of comes from the cooking time, like most traditional ethnic food its all about slow cooking.

The thing is that you first start with half an onion sweat till it virtually caramelises then add the spices you have to cook the spices off then add meat veg ect and coconut milk or diced tomato.

I use a combo of Turmeric, Ground Ginger, Cumin Asafoetida, Amchur, Black Pepper Chilli and salt and then add half tomato and half coconut milk. Then Eggplant, potato, peas, most of my Indian is vego but go with chicken or lamb for family and friends.

All of these are mentioned in that book and it gives pretty clear instructions. Depends on personal taste I guess for which ones you would have and how you want to use them.

You'll find that out of that you can mix up the Moroccan spice mix Ras El Hanout the recipe for that is freely available on the web.

I should also say that with Indian their is not one essential set of spices to have, if your going to do it and you'l see this in the book you need quite a few spices to get the desired effect.

Edited by Geoffrey Firmin - 10/28/13 at 12:25am
post #40428 of 56343
So I've been AWOL for some time... Seems O&J have closed up shop? I wanted to buy one of their boutonnieres frown.gif
post #40429 of 56343
Thanks
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The only thing i don't have in the cupboard regularly from that list is Asafoetida.
I have two indian supermarkets close enough so getting stuff isn't much problem. The indian instant packaged food is the only packaged stuff that works for me too.

I want to work on my eggplant skills - any tips?
I cant find those baby eggplants I loved in Taiwan and China.

I used to always start anything by heating a cast iron pan then frying off chopped onions in oil throw in some garlic and the wonder what dish I'd cook.

I recently saw some bloke explain that frying off /melting onions was best done by adding some small amounts of water at times. Makes a big difference.

Ms. fxh is from an onion farm so we eat onions like Foxy buys ill fitting shoes.
post #40430 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Thanks Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The only thing i don't have in the cupboard regularly from that list is Asafoetida.
I have two indian supermarkets close enough so getting stuff isn't much problem. The indian instant packaged food is the only packaged stuff that works for me too.

I want to work on my eggplant skills - any tips?
I cant find those baby eggplants I loved in Taiwan and China.

I used to always start anything by heating a cast iron pan then frying off chopped onions in oil throw in some garlic and the wonder what dish I'd cook.

I recently saw some bloke explain that frying off /melting onions was best done by adding some small amounts of water at times. Makes a big difference.

Ms. fxh is from an onion farm so we eat onions like Foxy buys ill fitting shoes.


You think cause it's in a spoiler that I won't read it.

post #40431 of 56343
Yes, of course it's all about you smile.gif
post #40432 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhound View Post
 


You think cause it's in a spoiler that I won't read it.

 

Inter-generational smack talk all up in this bitch. 

post #40433 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Yes, of course it's all about you smile.gif


Well, the joke is. Yes.

post #40434 of 56343
post #40435 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhound View Post


You think cause it's in a spoiler that I won't read it.

You cook? Wow you will be a catch for some imaginary girl.biggrin.gif

For fxh re Eggplant
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I eat a lot of Eggplant, put it on a grill use it in Italian pasta sauces. To cook it one of the best ways is to coat the it with oil using a pastry brush then fry or grill it off. As you know it absorbs oil like crazy. I also put a half on a grill char the flesh then transfer it to the oven for an hour or so on about 150c

Ottolengi a chef who writes for the Guardian has some great recipes for Eggplant I have one of his cookbooks Plenty and there are some great recipes by him posted on the Guardian site try this http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/series/yotam-ottolenghi-recipes His new cookbook Jerusalem is supposed to be very good and the food suits our climate excellent in summer and winter.

Also the only rice to use with Indian food is Basmati.

Mrs GF's nephew is a chef and he worked at a Michelin restaurant in Ireland where they always used to caramelise the onions, if you do it slow and long enough it brings all the sugars out. Makes a great base to build a meal. I find that if you leave the lid on a thick based pot the moisture from the steam is sufficient
post #40436 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post


You cook? Wow you will be a catch for some imaginary girl.biggrin.gif

Sure do m8. Pizza for $$$ and heaps of other dishes for fun.

post #40437 of 56343
Yotam Ottolenghi is awesome.
post #40438 of 56343
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Mrs GF's nephew is a chef and he worked at a Michelin restaurant in Ireland where they always used to caramelise the onions, if you do it slow and long enough it brings all the sugars out. Makes a great base to build a meal. I find that if you leave the lid on a thick based pot the moisture from the steam is sufficient

Yes I discovered that making French Onion Soup. But the idea that its really adding small amounts of water/moisture is the go. Alternating with drying it up then adding.
post #40439 of 56343
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

I'm the Mannix/Pell/Santamaria with a bit of Chopper, PJK, and Gatto thrown in.

I thought the best thing about Docklands was that you could hop on a tram and get out of there in 4 minutes!

 

 

I'm less Gatto and more gateau.

post #40440 of 56343
The secret with cooking with ground spices is to make sure the heat is on medium when you add them. Spices are usually added after the base stuff like onions, leeks, etc. The spices are supposed to be roasted, and high heat just burns them into a bitter tasting powder. Once the oils and aroma are released, ensure that anything added after is not cold eg water or cold meat or cold vegetables, as the cold will coagulate and lock in the oils and aroma you have just released. After this step, it is just a matter of braising. Peasy easy, applies to Indian, Thai, Malaysian, etc.
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