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Australian Members - Page 2591

post #38851 of 58020
Also, went to "The Mall". Omgz, so many azn's. picked up some nice Loro Piana for the wife and some Hogans.
post #38852 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

Has Uniqlo opened yet in Aus?

 

I'm back in Shanghai and dropped in to the Uniqlo at Grand Gateway the other day. Full of win. Fantastic shawl-collar knit cardies, decent Japanese thermal underwear (with arms long enough for laowai, unlike the Chinese ones); "fun" flannel shirts with jumbled-up colours and patterns; slim-fit stretch chinos for the hipsters; truckloads of other goodies.

 

I walked away with a shawl cardigan, a thin cardigan, thermals, and a fun flannel. Damage just over A$100 for the lot. You see, I can thrift too. :blush:

 

In other news, I've decided to go out on a limb (as it were) and commission a fully bespoke silk/linen suit from a local tailor. Now, Shanghai tailors don't have a particularly stellar reputation. So this is definitely a gamble. Even bigger gamble is the fabric, which is from a Chinese loom. But the swatch looks and feels very nice.

 

Total cost will be just over A$1K* and they are throwing in a MTM linen shirt. So, assuming the suit turns out to be wearable, it's definitely a bargain. And this is definitely my last sartorial purchase for the year. :fu:

 

 

* (I am getting a special price because I am good friends with the shop owner.)

 

I found and read an article in The Australian, (last week?) which has from memory,
the store opening soon, on the back of success of other stores like TopShop and Zara.
(With H&M to follow).

 

According to one of their executives, prices to be affordable, not low : ie. there is a chance that import duties and local conditions will see a bit of a markup.

Product lines to be new, and not just the last season from the Northern Hemisphere.

post #38853 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

I did! Rubbing shoulders with celebrities, how the internet changes us.

Not quite up there with having Michael Bastian friend me, but getting there.
post #38854 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSurg View Post

Fxh, FYI a lot of the histopathalogical studies on birds eyes are related to their corneas and lenses. For retina, more on rabbit, macaque monkey, and tiger salamander. Not sure, but I think birds at standard trichromats like us, just a lot of their vision differences is on eye placement and accommodation.

Couldn't resist. Sorry.

I think not - but I'm only going on a bit of stuff I read. See my edit to earlier post

"Only recently have we begun to grasp that vertebrates such as birds and fish possess more sophisticated color visual systems than we do. While we are trichromats, having photo-pigments with sensitivities at three peak wavelengths, birds have photo-pigments with sensitivities at four or five peak wavelengths, making them true tetrachromats, or perhaps even pentachromats. In some species, the visual spectrum extends into the ultraviolet range, once thought to be visible only to insects."

I'm only cutting and pasting stuff here - I have no real knowledge.

I'm really only concerned with the fact that "seeing" is a somewhat learned behavior and one can refine the skills. If we look at von Guerard the painter - he was clearly skilled at drawing all sorts of things, humans, plants animals, landscape - but he didn't (couldn't) at least early on - really see our landscape and kangaroos and aboriginals as we now see them. Due I suppose to his cultural conditioning, his lived experience of the visual work in Europe and his expectations.

Just as some caucasians can't tell the difference between Asians. Funnily most asians, as my Taiwanese friends tell me, can't tell the difference between most caucasians. So they revert to stereo types or the familiar - either film and television stars or fat, lazy white people stereo types. Luckily for me I've been told many times in Taiwan I look just like James Bond or George Clooney and asked for my autograph as I was clearly Paul McCartney years ago, not some fat American tourist. Truth is I don't look remotely like either Bond or Clooney - but it just shows you what people see. And react to.

Back to clothes soon - its not unrelated.
Edited by fxh - 10/5/13 at 11:33pm
post #38855 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Just riffing on and getting further away from clothes - theres been a lot of work done on how animals, birds in particular and plants and seeding interact through colour. Trouble is birds see different to humans. But its interesting

Another aside - I find most of the evolutionary psychology stuff very simplistic and unconvincing.

See below an abstract on the colour of light in forests. I'll get back on track later.

The Color of Light in Forests and Its Implications - John A. Endler Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The Color of Light in Forests and Its Implications- John A. Endler

Forests exhibit much variation in light environments, and this can affect communication among animals, communication between animals and plants, photosynthesis, and plant morphogenesis. Light environments are caused by, and can be predicted from, the geometry of the light paths, the weather conditions, and the time of day. The structure of forests leads to four major light habitats when the sun is not blocked by clouds: forest shade, woodland shade, small gaps, and large gaps.

These are characterized by yellow—green, blue—gray, reddish, and "white" ambient light spectra, respectively. When the sun is blocked by clouds, the spectra of these four habitats converge on that of large gaps and open areas, so the single light environment during cloudy weather will be called open/cloudy. An additional light environment (early/late) is associated with low sun angles (near dawn or dusk); it is purplish.

Each light environment is well defined and was found in forests of Trinidad, Panama, Costa Rica, Australia, California, and Florida. Scattered literature references suggest similar patterns elsewhere in North America, Europe, and Java.

Perceived colors of animals, flowers, and fruits depend upon the interaction between ambient light color and the reflectance color of the animal or plant parts. As a result, an animal or plant may have a different appearance in each environment, i.e., a color pattern may be relatively cryptic in some light environments while relatively conspicuous in others. This has strong implications for the joint evolution of visual signals and vision, as well as microhabitat choice. Plant growth and form may also be affected by variation in the color of forest light.
Ha, that was the article I came across.

As an aside to your aside, I think invertebrates have the most interesting vision. Flowers apparently make more sense when you see in ultra violet.
post #38856 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post


What fabric books are they from

 

MZN by Marzoni, spring/summer 2012.

 

 

 

 

There's a thread about them on SF here: http://www.styleforum.net/t/166486/marzoni-fabric

 

There's one particularly informative post on page 2.

post #38857 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Another aside - I find most of the evolutionary psychology stuff very simplistic and unconvincing.
 

 

I have just one word for you: Ockham.

post #38858 of 58020
Gillette?
post #38859 of 58020
Quote:
Another aside - I find most of the evolutionary psychology stuff very simplistic and unconvincing.


"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."
post #38860 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post
 

 

2 is definitely more narrow.

 

I think 1 looks the best. It could be worn with either a white or pale blue shirt and a navy/charcoal/grey suit?

 

They are all ugly and I wouldn't want to be wearing any of them.

 

Seriously atrocious 70s levels of gaudy there.

post #38861 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post
 

 

They are all ugly and I wouldn't want to be wearing any of them.

 

Seriously atrocious 70s levels of gaudy there.

 

x2. total real estate agent material there.

post #38862 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

^ Er, yeah, by South Bund Fabric Market standards, you are right. Been there, done that. 500rmb per suit, wear it once, burn it with fire. No thanks.

For 1k, i know of at least two places in HK where you can get full bespoke with quality cloth such as Holland and Sherry, Dormeuil, etc. with full handwork from a variety of old masters, each of whom specialises in pants and jackets. For the South Bund crap, 500RMB is already over twice the going price. You've been had, twice.

Just to clarify, all i am trying to say is that 1k Aud is a lot of coin for Chinese made with Chinese cloth.
Edited by Petepan - 10/6/13 at 1:26am
post #38863 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post


For 1k, i know of at least two places in HK where you can get full bespoke with quality cloth such as Holland and Sherry, Dormeuil, etc. with full handwork from a variety of old masters, each of whom specialises in pants and jackets. For the South Bund crap, 500RMB is already over twice the going price. You've been had, twice.

 

OK, so adding five 2000rmb return air fares SH-HK (for the five fittings), that's 10,000rmb and five full days of my time added to 6000rmb for the HK bespoke piece. It would want to be good.

 

Or I could go to WW Chan and pay 9,000-11,000rmb, and it would still be a crapshoot.

 

250rmb at the South Bund wouldn't even buy enough bad material for a bad suit.

 

Next our resident Old China Hand is going to tell all about how he used to pull three different birds a week on Maoming Lu.

post #38864 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

OK, so adding five 2000rmb return air fares SH-HK (for the five fittings), that's 10,000rmb and five full days of my time added to 6000rmb for the HK bespoke piece. It would want to be good.

Or I could go to WW Chan and pay 9,000-11,000rmb, and it would still be a crapshoot.

250rmb at the South Bund wouldn't even buy enough bad material for a bad suit.

Next our resident Old China Hand is going to tell all about how he used to pull three different birds a week on Maoming Lu.

There is no need to be condescending when i am just trying to make a comparison.

If you wish to factor in time and airfares, then why post in the Aus members thread?

Pay what you like, no one really gives a flying fuck.
post #38865 of 58020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

2 is definitely more narrow.

I think 1 looks the best. It could be worn with either a white or pale blue shirt and a navy/charcoal/grey suit?

As others have said, those ties are all pretty awful, to be frank.

Is there any chance that your aunt could pick you up a nice, conservative silk print tie instead of one of those satiny, striped monstrosities?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post


Just to clarify, all i am trying to say is that 1k Aud is a lot of coin for Chinese made with Chinese cloth.

I don't really know anything about having a bespoke suit made in mainland China, but I tend to agree with Petepan - $1000 does sound like a lot.

Also, whilst I really that this is entirely personal choice, if you're going to the trouble of having a bespoke suit made, do you really want it to be a suit in a pinkish silk-blend fabric? After all, how much wear do you really anticipate you'll get out of it?

I realise that getting something made up for you gives you the opportunity to get something that you can't find off-the-rack, but it also pays to consider just how much wear you'll get out of it. There's not much point in paying $1k for a bespoke suit if you're only going to wear it a few times a year.
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