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Australian Members - Page 2590

post #38836 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osiris2012 View Post
 

 

 

Can't argue with that good sir :)

 

The guy who bought this is also pretty baller:

 

post #38837 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post
 

 

The guy who bought this is also pretty baller:

 

 

He's the same one that gets something from P.J once a week, so, definitely baller.

post #38838 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post


Been reading but not reviewing just yet. I must be right on 50 by now. Did you spot the link I gave to one of my Goodreads comments?

 

I did! Rubbing shoulders with celebrities, how the internet changes us.

post #38839 of 52245
Gerry, how's this for a red stripe:

http://www.pjohnsonshop.com/collections/shirts/products/red-white-stripe-shirt

Ovlov, I'm five years out of my LL.B, feel free to shoot me a PM.
post #38840 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by The False Prophet View Post

Gerry, how's this for a red stripe:

http://www.pjohnsonshop.com/collections/shirts/products/red-white-stripe-shirt

Ovlov, I'm five years out of my LL.B, feel free to shoot me a PM.

 

Hey TFP, that looks pretty good! Thanks for letting me know.

post #38841 of 52245

Has Uniqlo opened yet in Aus?

 

I'm back in Shanghai and dropped in to the Uniqlo at Grand Gateway the other day. Full of win. Fantastic shawl-collar knit cardies, decent Japanese thermal underwear (with arms long enough for laowai, unlike the Chinese ones); "fun" flannel shirts with jumbled-up colours and patterns; slim-fit stretch chinos for the hipsters; truckloads of other goodies.

 

I walked away with a shawl cardigan, a thin cardigan, thermals, and a fun flannel. Damage just over A$100 for the lot. You see, I can thrift too. :blush:

 

In other news, I've decided to go out on a limb (as it were) and commission a fully bespoke silk/linen suit from a local tailor. Now, Shanghai tailors don't have a particularly stellar reputation. So this is definitely a gamble. Even bigger gamble is the fabric, which is from a Chinese loom. But the swatch looks and feels very nice.

 

Total cost will be just over A$1K* and they are throwing in a MTM linen shirt. So, assuming the suit turns out to be wearable, it's definitely a bargain. And this is definitely my last sartorial purchase for the year. :fu: 

 

 

* (I am getting a special price because I am good friends with the shop owner.)

post #38842 of 52245
^^^ 1k is ridiculously expensive. You've been had.
post #38843 of 52245

^ Er, yeah, by South Bund Fabric Market standards, you are right. Been there, done that. 500rmb per suit, wear it once, burn it with fire. No thanks.

post #38844 of 52245

Team, my Aunty is in Florence, and she wants to snag me another tie. She wants to get a burgundy stripe, but can't decide from the following. This tie would be worn for work. What would you wear a red stripe tie with? I'm thinking either 1 or 5.

 

post #38845 of 52245
1 and 2 are probably the most classic. 2 looks a little narrow but that might just be the way they're set up...
post #38846 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Seeing is not objective.

Never a truer word written. Sig worthy.

On colour, I once learned how to operate an offset printing press and as part of that did a colour perception test. Was very interesting to see how people see colour differently without ever being conscious of it.
post #38847 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

Has Uniqlo opened yet in Aus?

I'm back in Shanghai and dropped in to the Uniqlo at Grand Gateway the other day. Full of win. Fantastic shawl-collar knit cardies, decent Japanese thermal underwear (with arms long enough for laowai, unlike the Chinese ones); "fun" flannel shirts with jumbled-up colours and patterns; slim-fit stretch chinos for the hipsters; truckloads of other goodies.

I walked away with a shawl cardigan, a thin cardigan, thermals, and a fun flannel. Damage just over A$100 for the lot. You see, I can thrift too. blush.gif

In other news, I've decided to go out on a limb (as it were) and commission a fully bespoke silk/linen suit from a local tailor. Now, Shanghai tailors don't have a particularly stellar reputation. So this is definitely a gamble. Even bigger gamble is the fabric, which is from a Chinese loom. But the swatch looks and feels very nice.

Total cost will be just over A$1K* and they are throwing in a MTM linen shirt. So, assuming the suit turns out to be wearable, it's definitely a bargain. And this is definitely my last sartorial purchase for the year. ffffuuuu.gif  


* (I am getting a special price because I am good friends with the shop owner.)

What fabric books are they from
post #38848 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by The False Prophet View Post

1 and 2 are probably the most classic. 2 looks a little narrow but that might just be the way they're set up...

 

2 is definitely more narrow.

 

I think 1 looks the best. It could be worn with either a white or pale blue shirt and a navy/charcoal/grey suit?

post #38849 of 52245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

Hey mate, been meaning to follow up on this so thanks for prompting me.

I agree with your thesis, I think it's the same as what I'd concluded. I've also come across some literature that supports what we are saying, but also prompted me to think that even within the various latitudes and climates, how light reflects on us based on our surrounds (buildings, bush, concrete plazas - flourescent lights) will all affect our perceptions of colour.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The article dealt with animal's perceptions of colour based on diffuse or direct light environments - e.g. open plains versus heavily forested areas or under cloud cover. Different light environments favour different coloured ambient light spectra (red, yellow-green, white, blue-grey, purplish), which in turn impact on perception of colours.

Perceived colors of animals, flowers, and fruits depend upon the interaction between ambient light color and the reflectance color of the animal or plant parts. As a result, an animal or plant may have a different appearance in each environment, i.e., a color pattern may be relatively cryptic in some light environments while relatively conspicuous in others.

The article went on to point out that all the various light environments are present in Europe, Africa, Australia etc. based on the fact that you have dense/wooded/cleared forest environments in all this areas. Obviously for our purposes we are basically concerned with the urban light environment. One could assume this is largely homogenous in big cities, meaning that the greatest impact on colour perception will be cloud cover, the angle of incidence of the sunlight, and how it reflects from secondary sources such as buildings (impacted of course by the incidence - which is affected by latitude, time of year and time of day).

So Australian light, on average, is certainly different than British. Harsher. Less diffuse more of the time. More direct. Perhaps closer to Italian or Spanish light, which could be correlated for the preference for the colour palettes of those countries in the way we dress. And conversely why some combinations jar with us here, that would seem pale or washed out in wetter, cooler climes. You could take it further and argue Brisbane light or Sydney light is different to Melbourne light, where cloudy skies are more likely to diffuse the spectra, at least at certain times of the year.

As an aside was watching a bit of an art documentary by Waldemar Januszczak today - the same bloke that recently described a John Olsen painting as "a cascade of diarrhoea" (probably quite right there actually but I will defer the art criticism to GF). He started with a nice piece about the light in Venice, and how it attracted Turner. Obviously as you alluded to fxh this concept of "photosympathy" has been appreciated by artists for hundreds of years, and perhaps subconsciously by well dressed men and women as well. Don't know how Turner would have gone painting an Australian landscape, though he would have had fun with Sydney's smog.

Just riffing on and getting further away from clothes - theres been a lot of work done on how animals, birds in particular and plants and seeding interact through colour. Trouble is birds see different to humans. But its interesting

Another aside - I find most of the evolutionary psychology stuff very simplistic and unconvincing.

See below an abstract on the colour of light in forests. I'll get back on track later.

The Color of Light in Forests and Its Implications - John A. Endler Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The Color of Light in Forests and Its Implications- John A. Endler

Forests exhibit much variation in light environments, and this can affect communication among animals, communication between animals and plants, photosynthesis, and plant morphogenesis. Light environments are caused by, and can be predicted from, the geometry of the light paths, the weather conditions, and the time of day. The structure of forests leads to four major light habitats when the sun is not blocked by clouds: forest shade, woodland shade, small gaps, and large gaps.

These are characterized by yellow—green, blue—gray, reddish, and "white" ambient light spectra, respectively. When the sun is blocked by clouds, the spectra of these four habitats converge on that of large gaps and open areas, so the single light environment during cloudy weather will be called open/cloudy. An additional light environment (early/late) is associated with low sun angles (near dawn or dusk); it is purplish.

Each light environment is well defined and was found in forests of Trinidad, Panama, Costa Rica, Australia, California, and Florida. Scattered literature references suggest similar patterns elsewhere in North America, Europe, and Java.

Perceived colors of animals, flowers, and fruits depend upon the interaction between ambient light color and the reflectance color of the animal or plant parts. As a result, an animal or plant may have a different appearance in each environment, i.e., a color pattern may be relatively cryptic in some light environments while relatively conspicuous in others. This has strong implications for the joint evolution of visual signals and vision, as well as microhabitat choice. Plant growth and form may also be affected by variation in the color of forest light.

edit: a bit more about birds
"...birds and fish possess more sophisticated color visual systems than we do...."
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Birds, with their mastery of the air, have always held a fascination for humankind. While we have been able to approximate their soaring journeys with our relatively rudimentary airplanes, our understanding of their keen vision and related behaviors is still in its infancy.

As with all animals, studying color perception in birds is challenging. From observation, it’s clear that different species are attracted to bird feeders of particular colors, and that changing the color of ambient light can trigger early breeding, or alter fertility rates, by mimicking the change of seasons.

Only recently have we begun to grasp that vertebrates such as birds and fish possess more sophisticated color visual systems than we do. While we are trichromats, having photo-pigments with sensitivities at three peak wavelengths, birds have photo-pigments with sensitivities at four or five peak wavelengths, making them true tetrachromats, or perhaps even pentachromats. In some species, the visual spectrum extends into the ultraviolet range, once thought to be visible only to insects.

It is as hard for us to imagine how birds perceive color as it is for a colorblind person to imagine full color vision; it is outside of our experience. This impacts the study of bird behavior, and our grasp of how birds navigate during migration, classify objects, and interact socially and sexually. For example, some species we see as having identical male and female plumage differ when seen in the ultraviolet range - a difference apparent to the birds themselves.

Edited by fxh - 10/5/13 at 11:19pm
post #38850 of 52245
Fxh, FYI a lot of the histopathalogical studies on birds eyes are related to their corneas and lenses. For retina, more on rabbit, macaque monkey, and tiger salamander. Not sure, but I think birds at standard trichromats like us, just a lot of their vision differences is on eye placement and accommodation.

Couldn't resist. Sorry.
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