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Australian Members - Page 254

post #3796 of 52326
whats the best "mall brand" slim shirt in Australia that I could get in suburban sydney (cbb going to city that often)????

thanks
post #3797 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
My point was a bit different.

Sure I still have goods purchased years ago and they lasted. Whats more they were repairable and could be fixed. Much of todays goods simply can't be fixed.

But I'd respectfully point out that you are hampered by Survivor Bias or Selection Bias. That is - you only see the Mixers or HMVs that last and still work - the rest all went to the.

I think, respectively, you're also seeing what you want to see (ie. suffering from survivor/selection bias). Yes, there are always some things that went to the tip, but things were made to last, across the board, back then for a great many products. It's certainly not a case of only seeing the mixers or HMVs that last. I've seen a GREAT many more than that over the years that have lasted and continue to last, believe me.

Your point of cars is valid, fxh, but only for certain makes of car (back then, anything from Asia was often riddled with faults). My dad bought a Ford Falcon in the 70s and it's still servicable today. My sister has bought Fords her whole life (she's in her 50s now) and has never had a problem with them coming off the lot, through the 70s, 80s to now.
post #3798 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaypee View Post
Any Sydney guys want back issues of Mens Style, GQ, Mens Health and a few other random ones?
Probably 50/60+
Pickup in Sydney north west, getting thrown out this week.
Yes please
post #3799 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post
LPS

The Canberra Comics did win and they played with a bit of heart and actually put a few good phases of play together. The comments from one particular wag in bay 69 this year are getting even more entertaining as the season rolls on.

As I said I tried one in Dickson who I would not recommend at all so will go a have a look see, also been told there is one at Woden who is OK.
Is the cobbler you are referring to the one in the dickson square thingo (I don't know what that area is called) near the woolies? I had considered going to them at one stage but if they are the same ones you are talking about I will them from my list.

LPS
post #3800 of 52326
Guys I've been away from this thread and the forum for a while but the guy in mister minit at Belconnen Mall is quite good, I've only had basic stuff done like heels replaced and toe taps put on (he always has metal ones in stock) but he enjoys shoes and always likes a chat about them whenever I have bought loake and C&J's in.

I have heard the one in Manuka is quite good too, just outside coles in the plaza but have never used them (think it's also a mister minit)
post #3801 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWraith View Post
Your point of cars is valid, fxh, but only for certain makes of car (back then, anything from Asia was often riddled with faults). My dad bought a Ford Falcon in the 70s and it's still servicable today. My sister has bought Fords her whole life (she's in her 50s now) and has never had a problem with them coming off the lot, through the 70s, 80s to now.
Completely incorrect. Your sister's anecdotal at best experience notwithstanding, in just about every measurable way - cheapness to run, handling, reliability, safety, etc - modern cars are as a whole simply better in every way, save perhaps styling. If you honestly doubt that you should have a chat with, oh, anyone into vintage cars.
post #3802 of 52326
Modern cars are worse in that they are only as good as the cheap electronics that provide logic to the ECU. I can tell you so many stories of the latest and greatest European prestige car that grinds to a halt because of a fault 50 cent sensor. E.g the latest Alfa has a drivers door sensor that starts warming (or pumping..can't remember) the automatic transmission fluid when you open the driver's door. Of course....when this sensor goes...car goes nowhere. I know Renault Megane owners who have been unable to fill up their cars with petrol because the switch and motor to open the petrol filler cap fails. Renaults also have a 'top-dead-centre' sensor on the crankshaft to help with spark timing. This is prone to failure, in which case the car will not start. I've heard of Peugeots that won't start when the seatbelt sensor fails. Its one problem that these sensors fail. Its another problem that the diagnosis is often beyond the capabilities of your local mechanic. I knew people who worked in Ford Europe on ECU development. Ford dealers would often send them 'faulty' ECU's for analysis and diagnosis. The ECU was fine, the problem would be that some cheap sensor somewhere on the car would give a false or erratic voltage reading...and the ECU logic cannot cope with the 'out-of-spec' input and fails. That's my 2 cents...which is why I buy Japanese cars when living in Australia. I'll buy European cars in Europe, however you can buy basic models there with less electronic overheads than the models they sell in Australia. Plus parts and service are cheaper there too.
post #3803 of 52326
I really don't think you bolster your case much by using 3 terrible makes for reliability - Peugeot, Renault or Alfa - as blanket examples for either reliability or ease of fixing with modern cars. How many mechanics specialise in Peugeots, Renaults or Alfas? How many cars sold in Australia represent the 3 brands you mentioned? It is akin to taking the Mini and arguing that therefore all modern cars are inherently less reliable in many ways, or taking the Hummer and arguing that all modern cars are inherently less fuel efficient. And European prestige cars grinding to a halt because of a 50 cent sensor? You really need to spend time around vintage car collectors - and their stories of vintage European prestige cars grinding to a halt because of oil leaks, radiator leaks, gearbox issues, fuel line blockages, etc
post #3804 of 52326
I have no doubt that most old cars were unreliable death traps. I drove some of them. However when they did break down they were able to be easily fixed. I had an old '91 Peugeot 205 which I ran into the ground and did just under 200,000 km on it. Lots of bits on it wore out and needed replacing, but its saving grace was that it had a very simple Bosch Motronic electrical system. Before that I learnt to drive on a Datsun 180B (which did about 300,000 km). My parents also owned an '86 Nissan Skyline that was retired with 370,000 km on it. In many ways modern cars are vastly superior to their predecessors, but in many ways they have not improved at all. Despite massive improvements in engine efficiency, average fuel economy hasn't changed for the past few decades. Cars have continued to become larger and heavier, partly because they are crammed full of electronic luxuries. A modern car is little more than a consumer electronic device with four wheels. And don't get me started on SUVs.
post #3805 of 52326
have we considered the safety improvements of cars since the Datsun 180B. You surely are less likely to be injured or die in even the most basic of cars these days, compared to the old reliable stalwarts of the 70's and 80's.
post #3806 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by __PG__ View Post
Despite massive improvements in engine efficiency, average fuel economy hasn't changed for the past few decades.
What? Have you heard of a carburettor?

post #3807 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaypee View Post
Any Sydney guys want back issues of Mens Style, GQ, Mens Health and a few other random ones?
Probably 50/60+
Pickup in Sydney north west, getting thrown out this week.

Owwwww if only you are in Melb. I would have taken all the Men's Health mags off you.
post #3808 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by __PG__ View Post
I have no doubt that most old cars were unreliable death traps. I drove some of them. However when they did break down they were able to be easily fixed. I had an old '91 Peugeot 205 which I ran into the ground and did just under 200,000 km on it. Lots of bits on it wore out and needed replacing, but its saving grace was that it had a very simple Bosch Motronic electrical system.

Before that I learnt to drive on a Datsun 180B (which did about 300,000 km). My parents also owned an '86 Nissan Skyline that was retired with 370,000 km on it.

In many ways modern cars are vastly superior to their predecessors, but in many ways they have not improved at all. Despite massive improvements in engine efficiency, average fuel economy hasn't changed for the past few decades. Cars have continued to become larger and heavier, partly because they are crammed full of electronic luxuries. A modern car is little more than a consumer electronic device with four wheels.

And don't get me started on SUVs.

That's exactly right. In many ways, cars have improved over the years (particularly in terms of safety, and they also have a great many more gadgets), but in other ways, they have not improved at all. Indeed, in some ways, as you state, they have gone backwards.
post #3809 of 52326
I have a vintage car. It was very advanced for the 1960s, but it is essentially a slow, gas-guzzling, giant noise machine, when compared to a modern car.

It is also sexy as f**k, but the price for all this sex appeal is a complete lack of reliability and performance.

That's what you get with just about any 50 year old machine... or person for that matter.
post #3810 of 52326
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
Harvey Norman and others, succeeded not because they were all that visionary but because advances in manufacturing, especially the Chinese, with regard to quality, reliability and efficiency meant that buying a fridge or washing machine didn't require any backup expertise from the seller. We now expect, and get, goods that work out of the box and go without need for any repair for years. That wasn't the case in the "good old days". Nothing was plug and play and despite the nostalgia for the past most things required repeat fixing up.

Harvey Norman et all were basically the online merchants before online - that is they sold the goods without any knowledge of the good, no expertise and no after sales service. The manufacturer provided any warranties and HN would even charge extra for delivery - done by a third party anyway.

All changes in the market create challenges for existing players - the good ones adapt. The traditional australian response has been to clamor for protectionism and government help to avoid competition. ref; Gerry Harvey.

btw you don't see Gerry Harvey shedding any tears for all the small electrical goods retailers and local furniture stores he put out of business with his then new business model a few years back.

NB: The series on ABC TV called something like The High Street - is good to watch along with your Economics text book - it traces the fortunes of shopkeepers /retailers through a series of eras and gives an idea of how changes occurred in retail and how brutal customers and circumstances can be. Not to mention how sly retailers can be.

I'm glad you brought up that High Street show fxh, it is a very interesting program.

I think what's happening today to the likes of traditional big retailers like HN is very similar to what happened to the small corner stores back in the '60s.

When resale price maintenance was repealed in '64, large supermarkets could suddenly sell the same product at a cheaper price than their smaller competitors, due to their ability to buy in bulk and their lower overheads.

The same is happening today with the dawn of the age of online retailing. Without protectionist legislation, the larger tradtional merchandise retailers in Australia are facing competition from online businesses with lower overheads that can sell the same goods at a discounted price. It's now come full circle that the Harvery Normans of the world are now the victims of free trade, rather than the beneficiaries, and they don't like it.

The only difference to the 1960s is, IMO, the social downside to the loss of Harvey Norman &c. will be far less than it was when the quirky high street corner store went the way of the dodo and we all started shopping in faceless supermarkets and warehouses.
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