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Australian Members - Page 252

post #3766 of 57883
Has anyone got any experience with Alexander's Shoes on Smith Street? I'm looking for somewhere to get Topys put on my shoes. Any recommendation in the Fitzroy/CBD area would be good really.
post #3767 of 57883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbosaurus View Post
Has anyone got any experience with Alexander's Shoes on Smith Street? I'm looking for somewhere to get Topys put on my shoes. Any recommendation in the Fitzroy/CBD area would be good really.

Alexanders should be good - I had boots and shoes actually made there years ago. Its now just a repair place as far as I know run by the son - who when I went in there a while back wasn't interested in knowing about his fathers hand made boots I was wearing. Still maybe it was me being boring.

The good thing about Smith Street is you can score a hit over by the supermarket when you leave your shoes. (and when you pick them up)
post #3768 of 57883
Rekaris Shoes on Lonsdale st is good too
post #3769 of 57883
Perth Folks, D e v l i n s is having a sale on his shirts, ties and luggage. I'm not to sure how the quaility is but they did look okay when I saw them. Might be worth checking out.

Sanfort Shirts that were $275 are Now $82.50

Italian Double Cuff Shirts were $335 are now only $134

Doppio Ritorte (Double Twisted Cotton) Shirts were $405 Now only $167

I also have vouchers for discounts on ties, luggage and leather goods, as well as a free issue of Cigar Aficionado if that is your thing.
post #3770 of 57883
From The Australian:
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/nati...-1226036251221

Quote:
RETAILERS are slugging shoppers with fitting fees to stop them using their "change rooms" to try on garments that they then buy online.

Customers at some ski shops are being slugged a $50 "fitting fee" to try on ski boots.

The charge is refunded if they buy a pair of ski boots in-store, in a trend likely to be mimicked by other specialist retailers hard-hit by internet discounting.

"Bricks and mortar" retailers want the federal government to abolish a tax break for overseas retailers, who do not have to pay the 10 per cent goods and services tax or import duties of 10 to 15 per cent on items costing less than $1000.

He said his revenue had fallen by at least $100,000 a month, and his sales of True Religion designer jeans had dropped by 8000 pairs in the last three months of last year.

"Consumers are going into stores and trying on brands and then going online to the US to avoid the duty and GST," Mr Mendels told The Weekend Australian. "A garment bought from overseas means there is no garment bought here."

Mr Mendels said Australian retailers and importers had to pay GST and import duty - while wages, superannuation, sick leave, holiday pay and long service leave costs were higher than for Asian or American workers.

He said he was considering following retail giant Myer in setting up a foreign company to sell and mail his wares over the internet from Hong Kong.

Melbourne ski shop Bumps charges non-customers $1 a minute to adjust ski boots bought elsewhere.

Owner Peter Haley said some ski boot distributors were charging $100 to handle warranty claims for boots bought from overseas websites, which are not covered by statutory warranties in Australia.

"If everyone goes down the track and buys more and more gear overseas, then when they do need to get boots adjusted, there will be no one left in this country that can afford to provide the service and training," he said.
post #3771 of 57883
Why go in store for a boot adjustment when you could just consult an online forum, if you really need help.
post #3772 of 57883
I'd be interested to know how much import tariffs are, because, as discussed endlessly here already, its not the 10 percent GST that is sending people online.
post #3773 of 57883
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHECKstar View Post
I'd be interested to know how much import tariffs are, because, as discussed endlessly here already, its not the 10 percent GST that is sending people online.
Import tariffs on many of the kinds of goods discussed in these sort of articles are zero, and few things are above 10% Just more of the misrepresentation that Mr Harvey and co tend to peddle.
post #3774 of 57883
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHECKstar View Post
I'd be interested to know how much import tariffs are, because, as discussed endlessly here already, its not the 10 percent GST that is sending people online.
Have a look at the WTO Tariff Schedule. http://www.dfat.gov.au/trade/negotia...e/schedule.pdf Look at the bound rate of duty. According to the DFAT, 'tariffs actually imposed on goods when they are imported into Australia will normally be less than the WTO commitments set out in the consolidated schedule'. Edit: Footwear with leather uppers and outer soul have a duty of up to 27% imposed on them.
post #3775 of 57883
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHECKstar View Post
I'd be interested to know how much import tariffs are, because, as discussed endlessly here already, its not the 10 percent GST that is sending people online.

From memory tariffs on some clothing are 10%, I think on material content only.

Anyway its not on retail price but on price paid, which in most cases would be around 50% of retail.

All tariffs are due to be lowered to 5% or 0% in the near future.

Charging a fitting fee if the item is not purchased at the store or no future purchase is to be made makes perfect sense to me. (Unless its done as a punitive measure then it will just put customers off.)

Service and expertise and after sales service has always been opaquely bundled with most goods here. What online buying has does is unbundle the basic good from the service and after sales care.

The customer then gets to see what s/he is saving/missing by online buying. With a hell of a lot of the Australian retail experience what the customer misses by going online is SFA and a good dose of attitude. Making going online an altogether more satisfying experience both in price, quality, service and ability to return goods. (f'rinstance Lands End has an Australian return address for goods - saving the customer on USA postage cost)

Harvey Norman and others, succeeded not because they were all that visionary but because advances in manufacturing, especially the Chinese, with regard to quality, reliability and efficiency meant that buying a fridge or washing machine didn't require any backup expertise from the seller. We now expect, and get, goods that work out of the box and go without need for any repair for years. That wasn't the case in the "good old days". Nothing was plug and play and despite the nostalgia for the past most things required repeat fixing up.

Harvey Norman et all were basically the online merchants before online - that is they sold the goods without any knowledge of the good, no expertise and no after sales service. The manufacturer provided any warranties and HN would even charge extra for delivery - done by a third party anyway.

The difference is now that some, not all, online retailers, not only provide the unbundled goods but also offer a superior range of service, email exchanges around sizes, fit etc, photos of article, links to consumer reviews, no questions return policy, free return postage, instant messaging 24 /7 (very disconcerting to be browsing and have a chat about an article at 3am in bed) and even toll free international phone numbers. Try getting that from HN.


All changes in the market create challenges for existing players - the good ones adapt. The traditional australian response has been to clamor for protectionism and government help to avoid competition. ref; Gerry Harvey.

btw you don't see Gerry Harvey shedding any tears for all the small electrical goods retailers and local furniture stores he put out of business with his then new business model a few years back.

NB: The series on ABC TV called something like The High Street - is good to watch along with your Economics text book - it traces the fortunes of shopkeepers /retailers through a series of eras and gives an idea of how changes occurred in retail and how brutal customers and circumstances can be. Not to mention how sly retailers can be.

edit:: was talking to my brother who lives in UK last night and he tells me that VAT went up to 20% recently.

mhh Jan 2011 to be precise: http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2...-spending-cuts
post #3776 of 57883
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
Harvey Norman and others, succeeded not because they were all that visionary but because advances in manufacturing, especially the Chinese, with regard to quality, reliability and efficiency meant that buying a fridge or washing machine didn't require any backup expertise from the seller. We now expect, and get, goods that work out of the box and go without need for any repair for years. That wasn't the case in the "good old days". Nothing was plug and play and despite the nostalgia for the past most things required repeat fixing up.
I have to disagree, every appliance my grandmother owns has kept working or the materials have worn out. The beaters on an GE electric beater she owned (passed on from her mother) completely rusted through before the motor broke (probably due to dishwasher). Her Kelvinator fridge lasted 25 years before the seals fell apart and it started shuddering. Things are built these days so that you have your applicance for a couple of years and then you need to buy a new one. Her new Breville hand held beater is 2x heavier and the beaters don't sit in properly after twelve months of use and fall out. The most expensive and largest Fisher and Paykel standalone fridge is losing its seal after 2 years. Anyone notice rum has a higher duty than other spirits? Probably due to our (crappy) Bundaberg Rum.
post #3777 of 57883
Nice summation fxh. The other point that tends to get muddied in the media is that even if Australian duty is a significant component of the cost to local retailers (which it more often isn't) then this in itself is not a satisfactory explanation for the much of the huge retail price premiums paid here compared to offshore online sites. In many cases those offshore sites are located in countries with similar import tariff schemes (like the UK and US) and so the cost to consumers here includes a similar component, just not paid to the oz government. The exceptions being where the retailers ship direct from offshore (to them) manufacturers/suppliers.
post #3778 of 57883
Perhaps another reason why prices are so high is because the Australian retail market essentially thrives on inefficiency and a lack of real competition. Not unlike so much else in Australia, TBH - banking, telecoms, public transport, automobiles, etc. Even the 'return' on the much heavier taxes the higher income brackets get slugged with in terms of infrastructure, etc, is simply not there. Australian roads - even ones in the cities - are amongst the worst I have come across for the first world. You literally have better roads in Beijing than in Sydney. Ditto for the airports, which carry much less traffic than elsewhere. Everything depends on the strong few to prop up the weak majority, and/or for the weak majority to be 'protected'. I'm not an economist nor am I trained as such, but as someone who has lived in 2 continents/cultures, this appears to be the case.
post #3779 of 57883
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobro View Post
Why go in store for a boot adjustment when you could just consult an online forum, if you really need help.

I guess you're not a skier then?

Fitting ski boots is a black art. It requires a lot of experience to match a foot type to a particular manufacturers shell. Because a ski boot is rigid, your have virtually no margin for error. Plus ski boots make C&J handgrades look cheap.

There is a good reason why Bumps charge the fee....because you can't buy ski boots blind at all. You have to try them on first...and the fitting process takes about at least an hour or so.
post #3780 of 57883
SF siting in Perth... brown pinstripe 3 piece suit, shell cordovan shoes
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