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Australian Members - Page 2462

post #36916 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukejackson View Post


Thanks mate!

I've seen the Haspel ones a fair bit - I'm a bit hesitant though, with no idea how it would fit. 211 isn't bad for half canvassed though.

Funnily enough, Arthur Galan, David Jones just got in black/white seersucker suits. I'm not a fan of the colour, but more importantly, they aren't worth the $500. Feel so cheap and the quality is obviously not there (edit: fully fused). I might take a risk and go with the haspel one once I pay off a few bills.

Ralph Lauren factory outlet at Birkenhead point has Seersucker on clearance $150 down from $500
1 x 40R
1 x 42R
2 x 44R
post #36917 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

No

There is a problem in referring to Sharpies. There were two eras. {continues below fold} Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The later era was just violent yobs who had more in common with Skinheads than the earlier Sharpies. The first iteration of Sharpies in Melbourne, and this was almost an exclusive Melbourne phenomena, were interested in a a "look" and probably had more in common with UK Mods than anything else. But the style was entirely homegrown. Could be described as a Mod look influenced by European (mainly Italians). It was sort of centered in the north from Fitzroy/ Collingwood to Coburg/Preston. And revolved around clothes and music rather than brawling.

It was composed of mainly young men (and also women) - under 22 or so - who were in the main , but not exclusively, apprentices, or trainees/juniors at work. This is important as its a different age and employment status than the later yob Sharpies. Because they were employed and not students they had money to spend on clothes. Sharp clothes were made in Thornbury, Brunswick, and Richmond by European tailors. In the early 70s a first year apprentice earned sixteen dollars per week, and by the time they were on a full time wage thirty six dollars…a Conte cardigan cost thirty dollars and had a two week wait.

The clothes clearly had some UK Mod influences, but morphed into something else. There was an easy availability of Italian and Greek tailors in Fitzroy, Brunswick and along High Street. The odd old shop is still there. The Cresknit factory was in High street somewhere and Conte Brothers factory was in Alphington - or vice versa. A Conti Cardigan became the generic name for the type of customised knitwear in polo tops, jumpers and cardigans.

You could go the the factory and stand at the counter and order your cardigan in whatever colours and combinations you wanted. Different coloured buttons, half belt at back, broad stripes across chest, patch pockets - whatever. Or as many did you could take a coloured drawing in pencil, no computers or textas, and have it made up to specs.

Flags were very wide/ straight legged high wasted trouser that were made up out of suiting material. Mostly stuff like grey chalk striped flannel, herringbone or POW checks The most common and classic was a mid or charcoal grey with a chalk stripe. They were fitted around the bum, hips and waist and high waisted. They were straight down in that French manner. They flapped around as you walked hence "flags". . They were high and tight at the waist and falling straight down to a 11" - 12 " cuff opening.

What made them different was that in the early days you could only get them by going to a tailor and getting a pair made. Later on there were small shops that sold some ready to wear and many of the tailors saw an opening and had a bunch of ready to wear in their shops.

Toward the end a few small chains and menswear shops stocked a variation of flags. Trouble was they weren't as well made, had inferior materials and lacked the spiffy details like back buckles belts and pocket flaps etc that real clothes nerds appreciate.

Melbourne still had shoemaking factories and blokes who would hand make you custom shoes. Usually glued not stitched but hand made. These too were designed by the customer. Venus and Apollo and Acropolis shoes were some favourites. The shoes usually had a high heel, sometimes a small (or large) platform sole, and wide square chisel toes. In various colours. Red, Blue, green and spectator /correspondent combinations as well.

The hair was short, compared to the Hippies extant and general public, but longer than skinhead. More like the suedehead look.

The music was often at the inner city CBD venues - called discos - but usually live music. Many had lunch time concerts during the day where workers could spend and hour in darkness listening and dancing (or pashing) to live music during the weekday.

This clothes focused sharpies era probably only lasted from the late 60s to 72 or so. The fashion soon died out as people grew up and moved on, became qualified tradesmen etc and had families, and especially as it was devalued by the violence of the younger yobs in jeans, boots and skinhead look, coming through and their ignorance about clothes.

As you can imagine many of those truly interested in clothes to go to tailors and spec up a pair of pants, plus go to a shoemaker and order their own design shoes, plus go to the cresknit factory and get a one off cardigan , are likely to carry on to suits and other stuff and not remain stuck in a youth culture forever.

fxh

Great post and interesting sartorial cultural observations. The sharpie/yob movement in Sydney was heavily influenced initially by Slade and violence, Elton John's Saturday Night's All right for fighting was something of an anthem.It all started around 72 and then petered out by 76. There was no sartorial bent influencing the behaviour just violence. Had to laugh at the wages made me think first factory job at 16 I had pay was $32 a week after tax.
post #36918 of 53664

Anyone want to be cool this summer? 

 

Im talking linen shirts, Luxire, and a light blue/ light grey stripes on white background fabric.

 

Im trying to rustle up some solid interest in this fabric (4 more confirmed orders) and Luxire will make some up. 

 

Check out the pic for the idea if this grabs you.

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/304965/luxire-custom-clothing-official-affiliate-thread/4815#post_6561988

 

...probably be about $130 but not sure atm.

post #36919 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaypee View Post

Ralph Lauren factory outlet at Birkenhead point has Seersucker on clearance $150 down from $500
1 x 40R
1 x 42R
2 x 44R

Suits or jackets?
post #36920 of 53664
jackets
post #36921 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

No Lad is just a moneyed Bogan.

My son would like to know where the young members buy shorts from either online or bricks and mortar. Don't ask me I have already pointed him in the direction of J Crew STP.


Land's End?

post #36922 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by burnso View Post

Anyone want to be cool this summer? 

Im talking linen shirts, Luxire, and a light blue/ light grey stripes on white background fabric.

Im trying to rustle up some solid interest in this fabric (4 more confirmed orders) and Luxire will make some up. 

Check out the pic for the idea if this grabs you.

http://www.styleforum.net/t/304965/luxire-custom-clothing-official-affiliate-thread/4815#post_6561988

...probably be about $130 but not sure atm.

Put me down as a maybe. Can we get more deets on the fabric?
post #36923 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbles View Post


Land's End?

+1, although some might complain that the "tailored" cut could be a little slimmer. However, I like them a lot and LE's chino shorts are very durable and come in some great colours.

They also often have a choice of lengths, depending on whether you like your shorts to come down to just above your knee or to be a bit higher up your thighs.
post #36924 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post


Put me down as a maybe. Can we get more deets on the fabric?

Ill send them an email and try to get an idea about what they might be thinking.

 

I just last night asked them if they had seen this material or willing to make it, they said they'd be happy to make it with 5 confirmed orders, so I immediately put out the feelers.

 

At this point Im assuming it'd be the Irish linen at about $130 USD such as http://luxire.com/products/blue-chambray-linen, but could be cheaper at $90 such as http://luxire.com/products/white-grey-stripes-linen.

post #36925 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


They also often have a choice of lengths, depending on whether you like your shorts to come down to just above your knee or to be a bit higher up your thighs.

Cant wait to see the pics. {wink} Hello Sailor.
post #36926 of 53664
Heres some Sharpie clothes and shoes.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
post #36927 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Heres some Sharpie clothes and shoes.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Was there any relation music wise to the ska scene in the uk.
post #36928 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayhill View Post

White for me.

Anyone bought any MJ Bale t-shirts? Are the white ones see-through (nipplez)?

I've got a grey one, and it's a pretty nice, thickish fabric, so if the white ones are the same I think we would be looking at a no-nip sitch.
post #36929 of 53664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty Brogues View Post

Was there any relation music wise to the ska scene in the uk.

I doubt it.
This was really back in late 60s so that was the "first wave"/original ska era. Not the "second wave" revival of the Two Tone etc in the late 70s. . The "thrid wave" was in the 80s.

Little Millie (Millie Small) - shown in that Aywon advert, toured in 1965 in Australia and NZ on the back of her No 1 hit "My Boy Lollypop". That was the first mainstream hit with ska. Probably more correctly called blue beat at that time.

I've not heard of any explicit ska connection from the early days of Sharpies.

An interesting, but unconnected item of interest. One of the early ska bands in Jamaica was from Australia /Melbourne. The Caribs went to Jamaica in 1958 and in 1959 became a studio ska band doing many backings for system/dancehall recording in Jamaica. One of the engineers on these early recording was also from Melbourne - Graeme Goodall - for Coxone Dodd and Studio One. The Caribs also worked for Chris Blackwell and Prince Buster in early pre ska days.

The Caribs are re-forming for the Celebration of Melbourne Ska festival. I'm not sure how many of the originals are coming. One of the originals lives in Melbourne.
http://www.pbsfm.org.au/node/28498
Edited by fxh - 8/28/13 at 6:26pm
post #36930 of 53664
I have too. Not see through.
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