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Australian Members - Page 2303

post #34531 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Glad to see fxh's modelling career has finally taken off.
post #34532 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by nabilmust View Post

People should be all over those cashmere scarves.

 

Totally - the tally so far: blackwatch, grey, navy check, wine and plum. Two were bought as gifts though smile.gif

post #34533 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osiris2012 View Post

Thanks for digging that up, hrmm can't decide if I could pull off polka dots, looks good on you or whoever was rocking it though. 

 

I reckon it's worth a shot. Nice to have at least one knit tie with polka dots and this one looks pretty classy.

post #34534 of 57963
post #34535 of 57963

I have two straights of differing grinds. Sometimes you want the exquisite "ping" of a hollow ground, but they can be a bit of work.

 

I also have my grandfather's razor, a Rolls. It has a built in stone/strop, and the original blades still gives great shaves after 70 years (i have had them properly honed once). Very technically interesting device.

 

That said, 90% of my shaves are done with a DE due to laziness. You still get an epic shave, the razors are as satisfying as a straight, and it's almost impossible to stuff up. 20 bucks for a 100 pack of Astra SP's is well over a year's worth of shaving, too.

 

Modern cartridges are expensive junk.

post #34536 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osiris2012 View Post

 

Thanks for digging that up, hrmm can't decide if I could pull off polka dots, looks good on you or whoever was rocking it though. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

 

I reckon it's worth a shot. Nice to have at least one knit tie with polka dots and this one looks pretty classy.

 

+1. I have an unhealthy fascination with knit ties, and those with polka dots as well.

post #34537 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by nabilmust View Post


+1. I have an unhealthy fascination with knit ties, and those with polka dots as well.

+2. I've got quite a few navy knit ties with polka dots - white dots, green dots, pink dots and sky blue dots. All I need to complete the collection is to find a nice navy knit tie with red dots, and then the ever-so-elusive "rainbow" knit tie, with dots of different colours.

So, I'd say go for it - a polka-dot knit tie looks good with a range of outfits and can be dressed down or dressed up (within reason, of course, remembering that a knit tie is inherently more casual than its woven counterpart).
post #34538 of 57963
JM, you might see both of the ones you are after in the S/S range if you're lucky!
post #34539 of 57963

American Tailors has C&J handgrades for $600, if you push him on the price.

post #34540 of 57963
Are they having their sale now?
post #34541 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Carter View Post

JM, you might see both of the ones you are after in the S/S range if you're lucky!

Eeeeexcellent! I look forward to seeing the S/S range in due course!
post #34542 of 57963
From an article entitled Why do men wear shorts from Pacific Standard

As I sit here in Southern California, wearing pants, while also surrounded by the throngs of men wandering the streets and wearing shorts (and also wearing mid-calf socks, which … is confusing?), the distinction is no less clear. Pants? Shorts? Man, I just don’t know. So, I exchanged emails with Professor Susan Kaiser of the University of California-Davis, who is an expert in the psychology of clothing. To get a hold on Arguably the Most Important Question Facing the Modern American Male, Kaiser suggested we look at the Western history of shorts:
Within Western culture, the history of shorts becomes intertwined with those of breeches or culottes (worn prior to the French Revolution in 1789), and thereby linked with issues of class as well as masculinity. Long trousers had been worn by the working classes, whereas aristocratic and bourgeois men wore breeches/knickers/culottes. This changed after the revolution, and long pants began to be worn by men of all classes in the 19th century. Shorts per se were for little boys, who “evolved” into their manhood by switching from long white dresses (infants) to shorter white dresses (toddlers) to shorts (little boy) to breeches (middle childhood or so) to long trousers (probably teens). This progression—associated with the 19th and early 20th centuries—was associated not only with age grades but also with a kind of “flight from femininity” and toward manhood. (The implication, of course, is that femininity did not have the same trajectory; it was infantilized to a much greater extent.)
post #34543 of 57963

I was just in American Tailors.

 

They have three styles of Gaziano and Girling for $397.

 

I then went to Luisa's.

 

They have 2 pairs of size 9 Edward Greens for $565.

post #34544 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightace View Post

I was just in American Tailors.

They have three styles of Gaziano and Girling for $397.

I then went to Luisa's.

They have 2 pairs of size 9 Edward Greens for $565.
Only size 9??
post #34545 of 57963
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightace View Post

I was just in American Tailors.

They have three styles of Gaziano and Girling for $397.

I then went to Luisa's.

They have 2 pairs of size 9 Edward Greens for $565.


What a deal - that must be way, way below their actual cost.
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