or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Australian Members - Page 2280

post #34186 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

My dad started out as a fitter-and-turner and he said that he used to wear his good clothes to work and then change into overalls and boots at work - and he wasn't the only one, as most of his workmates used to do the same.

Even after my father became an engineer, he'd still often have to get dirty on work sites, but once again he'd dress well to head to work and then change into work clothes once he got there.

He wore shorts around the house but whenever left the house, he'd always put on a pair of long trousers, a button-up shirt and proper shoes.

My father was a rigger and I distinctly remember his Florshiem cap toes and RM boots. I also remember he had a pair of boots made at The Marvel Shoe Co in Flinders St Darlinghurst, they used to do a lot of riding boots for jockeys. I also remember my mother ironing his work shirts and trousers. (along with my Levis, shudder)
post #34187 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Good shoes were certainly more readily available, and the other forgotten factor is that there were people making good quality shoes (in Melbourne at least). Not just one or two shops either.
Australia wasn't always a tertiary economy; in the 1940s through to the '60s the manufacturing industry thrived on foreign investment and cheap local labour, similar to the experience of developing countries today. Now the tariffs are gone and the labour is expensive, so importing is far more cost effective than greenfields investment in Australian manufacturing capacity.

But back then a lot of good shoes were made here under licence - such as Packard and Florsheim - mainly to avoid the prohibitive tariffs imposed on imports that existed in the post war years. The design and lasts were usually imported from the US, while the labour (cheaper than the US then) and leather was sourced locally to make the shoes. Apparently most of the shoes were hand welted until the 1950s. There were also some home grown competitors, such as Edward Meller, who used to make mens shoes here (I don't believe the modern company of the same name is related).

By this way the (mainly US) companies could penetrate the local market and avoid the trade barriers. The most obvious example of this method was in the automotive industry... not just Ford and Holden but Chrysler, even Citroën used to build cars under licence here (Citroën actually had a plant in West Heidelberg). Some Swiss watches were also assembled here, as were optics, and there are probably thousands of other examples. Quite often the quality of the product from the Australian factories (or assembly lines) was equal to or superior to the "home" product...

So no, it wasn't a case of having to pick up good shoes on an overseas trip... that was for the toffs mate! I have a relative who boasted that he was born in Carlton, went to school in Lee St, then to Carlton tech on Victoria St (now part of RMIT), worked in Carlton, and wanted to be buried in Melbourne General cemetery... in Carlton. "Never have to leave Carlton" he said.
post #34188 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

You've got a lot to learn then about shoe soles.
Perfect modern spouse.

She is indeed!
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Azzarro. And maybe make an appointment with Matt for a Suit Shop chat. Visit Richard at Ludlow's and play with his HC line. (When the trunk show was on, they had a stand of suits at unbelievable prices, but they may be gone now). Drop in at the Men's Biz warehouse.

If you like cologne, the perfume section at Myer Melbourne, including the Mecca stand, is great. Not cheap, but you will get to try some amazing stuff.
Pack a coat. And a sweater, a scarf, some gloves and your thermals.

I see the weather has taken a turn for the grim, just in time for my arrival! My only long coat is pretty crappy, I was going to try to get away with a flannel-like blazer over a v-neck with a scarf, which saw me through most of Japan.

Thanks for the suggestions: Azzaro was the one that I was grasping for the name of. Men's Biz is the grooming supplier, yes?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Socks View Post

Here is an old post I did about visiting Melbourne that may help a little (there are probably some new places now) - http://linenforsummertweedforwinter.tumblr.com/post/16382719413/hey-man-i-saw-a-couple-of-places-that-youre-from

Loving this cold weather, finally get to use my whole wardrobe including scarves, gloves, overcoats and I do not arrive to work hot and sweaty after the 15 minute walk.

Thanks! I've checked out Sarti before, found them to be a bit pricey.

The restaurant of same name, on the other hand, looks great! Actually, while I'm at it, any recommendations for where to eat? I know most of the obvious spots but I'm sure there's plenty that I'm missing...
post #34189 of 54763
Interesting stuff POP.

There was also a thriving industry of small cobblers making their own shoes, particularly in the inner city.

PS My son goes to Lee St and I live three blocks away!
post #34190 of 54763
This is what you have to do to be well-dressed, according to the meedya (in short, very, very little):

http://www.guardian.co.uk/fashion/fashion-blog/2013/jul/09/andy-murray-suit-downing-street-stylewatch
post #34191 of 54763
^ ouch that's awful...

Been struggling a bit for time to post fits lately, but snuck one out today.






Details: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Suit: MJ Bale
Shirt: Cottonwork (needs collar points lengthened)
Tie: Henry Carter Macclesfield #5
Ps: Henry Carter white irish linen
Shoes: Meermin MTO
post #34192 of 54763
^^ How is the baby Jase? I'd like to tell you things get easier, but...well...that would a bald-faced lie smile.gif
post #34193 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post

^^ How is the baby Jase? I'd like to tell you things get easier, but...well...that would a bald-faced lie smile.gif

Well, things do get much easier in some ways (more sleep, no more middle-of-the-night feeds), but more difficult in others as children learn to argue, learn to test the boundaries and so on!
post #34194 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

Well, things do get much easier in some ways (more sleep, no more middle-of-the-night feeds), but more difficult in others as children learn to argue, learn to test the boundaries and so on!

LOL then children become teenagers and then young adults. What fun! smile.gif
post #34195 of 54763
Yeah going great thanks, she is almost 5 months old now, time flies. She is a good baby overall, sleeps well and is very happy (and gorgeous but of course every dad says that).

How old is yours now?

Here is a pic of her a few weeks back coming for a visit in the office -

post #34196 of 54763
The scary thing is when they start to address you in an adult way. The missus had a small snap at our 11 year old for not responding to something she said and he turned around cool as a cucumber and said 'I knew you were addressing me; now what did you want to discuss?'.
post #34197 of 54763
Adorable! Olly is eight months now, here's a pic:

post #34198 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post


By this way the (mainly US) companies could penetrate the local market and avoid the trade barriers. The most obvious example of this method was in the automotive industry... not just Ford and Holden but Chrysler, even Citroën used to build cars under licence here (Citroën actually had a plant in West Heidelberg). Some Swiss watches were also assembled here, as were optics, and there are probably thousands of other examples. Quite often the quality of the product from the Australian factories (or assembly lines) was equal to or superior to the "home" product...

Coincidentally, I just spotted this episode of ABC Radio National's rather good "Rear Vision" program, about the history of Australia's car industry, including tariff barriers and financial encouragements:

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/rearvision/australian-auto-industry-myths/4808616
post #34199 of 54763
So I walked into Harold's today and they had a beautiful Dark brown PAL Zileri trench however.....it was $2300.

any thoughts on how to source it cheaper from the states or overseas?

Should i go back in there, find out the model number and just use an overseas proxy?
post #34200 of 54763
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post


I recommend Coombs in the Strand, Evonne and Paul knows their shoe care, and its a family owned business.

Bloody legend, thanks mate!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members