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post #33931 of 52382
Initial rant about university clothes here:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post


papa - I haven't had time to type - still haven't really - but... some short notes...

I've worked directly on campus for a uni (and TAFE!) and in most jobs I've had a lot to do with Unis - like hosting departments as part of work and forging contracts/relationships etc partnership in research etc. and setting up departments.

The basic statement is in most faculties if you are neat and clean and own more than 3 sets of outfits then you will be unusual. There is an immature dependent mentality in much of academia that encourages a perpetual adolescence especially in males.

That said it does vary between university, campus and discipline, and rural and urban. Other than brief visits I am only familiar with Victorian Unis. I'd say that based on visits other states are no better and often worse - ref: Qld/NT/WA

Lets start with an anecdote and observation - Some time ago I was invited back to a "re-union" of the particular campus I had worked on. I think it was about 20 years since I had first worked there. Anyway - most people were recognisable by the clothes they wore. I can particularly remember two members from the Engineering faculty. I swear they were wearing the exact same clothes as they wore 20 years earlier. Shrunken v necked woolen jumpers and jeans and nondescript green coloured shirts - open necked and beards - scraggly and unshaped. The only difference was less hair - balding and bigger bellies. I'm not using hyperbole here - I do really think it was the same clothes.

Like a lot of things in life it depends what you want to achieve. If you want to influence people, shape opinions, get people onside , build things, encourage people to follow you -then you will dress different than if you are a lab scientist who just does his/her job or an IT service person who only needs to keep the network up or a (typical) resentful lecturer who doesn't care beyond their immediate job. Many jobs don't require much effort to influence and convert and achieve things by getting people to work together and listen / respond to you.

In the above cases it doesn't matter what you wear - because - in general - you don't care what people think and you only mix with your own kind.

If on the other hand you want to get things done, because you care, or because its your job, to mix and influence with a range of people NOT made in your own image then you might think about how you present.

There is an added complication, in a campus of academics who pride themselves on their "eccentricity" and "uniqueness" there is a stultifying conformity in dress that anywhere else would be considered a breach of human rights legislation.

An inner city "arts" faculty will tolerate little outside of black, nondescript greys and general un-ironed scruffiness. Occasionally they will permit a clean black look and sometimes a surly resentful "fun" tie on a ill fitting black shirt.

Outside of arts and liberal sciences jeans and ill fitting creased shirts worn for a week at a time are de rigueur and a tie will be seen as selling out to "admin" and possibly the cause of a complaint to the union or at least shunning in the tea room over stale tea bags and soggy malt biscuits. A suit that fits will be seen as "oppressive" to workers - all this by people on secure tenure and above average salaries and working hours that provide for every Friday off and much "working from home" and leisurely 6 weeks over xmas holidays. Not to mention numerous junkets to conferences interstate

I better go but a bit more:

Medical and Business faculties are comfortable with suits and ties. And even being well dressed.

If you want or have to interact and co-operate and influence lost of people you will need first impressions and lasting impressions.

Clothes too neat or too new will frighten many immature people. A tie will be often seen as suspect. A tailored jacket will sometimes be suspect.

You will need to dress for the day - if you need to consult with the sociology dudes then a suit and tie will work against you - you need not too clean jeans and open necked shirt - working with the Medicine women and blokes on a building project - then a suit and tie is fine - the Arts women on a new building? - then don't wear a tie - at least on first meting - after people know you a while and trust you then anything is ok - the arts women will even like a suit and tie ...{wink}

If you have money, grants or promotions to distribute then wear what you want - everyone will suck up to you.

This is all a bit quick and might not be fair ........

I didn't get around to mentioning a few things:

It also depends on what sort of role you have and what sort of person you are.

Do you teach? Much? Do you do one off lectures or do you have a consistent bunch of students for a semester or a whole year?

Are you friendly, egalitarian and friendly and charming by nature or are you naturally stand offish, self absorbed and not a real "people person"?

Are you an expert in your field or just a conduit for information? Good lecturer - public speaker?

The hardest part is knowing yourself, your style and the environment /context you are in. You cant know yourself overnight. And what looks great on one person will be totally wrong on another.

In general a "hard" look - shiny worsted suit, bright red shiny tie, white shirt doesn't go down all that well anywhere except those brash environments where it is standard.

A hard look is by nature more confrontational, less amenable to influence - if this is combined with a natural tendency to be this way yourself then it spells relative disaster in most situations.

A "softer" more approachable, but still smart and clean, look is rarely the wrong look.

So think of not bright white shirts, not severe spread collars, not smooth poplin shirts, not shiney bright ties in single colours, not worsted suits and jackets, not mirror polished shoes, not high shiny belts, not cufflinks, not pocket hankies. Think textures - say cords, different weaves, chambray shirts, OCBD, suede shoes and belts, brogues or more "country" shoes on sensibel lasts rather than narrow and sleek, woven leather belts, relaxed jackets, subdued colours.......

Oh for a place to buy a wash n wear or poplin suit in a relaxed fit in khaki or blue.
post #33932 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by coxaca View Post

Academics tend to eschew sartorialism, as they like to regard themselves as "serious thinkers" for whom all of the petty vicissitudes of mere mortals are a distraction from the important stuff.

The important stuff being, writing endless grant applications, marking undergrad exam papers, and pooh-pooing their competitors' presentations at conferences.

Yeah, right.

My brother is a professor, worked on campus all his life, runs his own lab, publication list a mile long etc etc. Worst dress sense I've ever seen. He wears his unspeakable rags like a badge of honour. Bah.


I'm a scientist in a biotech institute on campus and can vouch for much of this.

I even got many suspicious looks when I turned up to the lab in trousers and a button up (but once people got to know me they've dropped the initial judgements). I was actually asked by one of the research-assistants (who is in his late 20s like me) "when was I going to stop dressing all fancy." (I almost responded that as long as you keep wearing shorts and worn-out sneakers, I'll keep wearing this.)

However, science and academia generally is full of oddballs and as others have pointed out, most people will accept your dress sense eventually as long as it's not too outrageous and you wear it well. I'm in a strange position where lots of the work that comes out of the institute is for biotech/pharma companies, so we have the full gamete of shorts/t-shirt lab researchers, all the way to suited and booted executives who come to meet with the Professors and group leaders about commercialisation of novel research, large investments and start-ups (this is the rare occasion when you see the academics wearing a jacket and tie). The director however, who started as a researcher himself, is always immaculately dressed. He came to a lab meeting the other day in a grey herringbone jacket, blue cotton trousers, a navy spotted knit tie and black horse-bit loafers. However, it really only seems to be the much more senior positions in which this style of dressing is expected/encouraged.
post #33933 of 52382
Afternoon Gents. I know this has been covered previously, and I'm in the process of conducting research on the matter, however I'd like to get some personal perspectives on Hong Kong form both a sartorialist and food perspective.

The plan is to spend 6 nights there in late October and I've already pencilled in visits to:

- Uniqlo
- The Armoury
- WW Chan (may be combined with the above - firing off some enquiries as we speak)

In addition to this Ms Smeggett and myself have set ourselves a challenge to sample the (nominal) 8 schools of chinese cooking when there, so any recommendations for restaurants offering different cuisines would be appreciated. We'll be staying near TST, so anything Kowloon, Mongkok, Causeway Bay, etc is infinitely do-able.

PS: fxh - I'm enjoying reading your observations on academic dress. It's bringing back plenty of memories, not least of which is the flanny shirts and track pants I used to amble about in back in my uni days... shog[1].gif
post #33934 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggett View Post

Afternoon Gents. I know this has been covered previously, and I'm in the process of conducting research on the matter, however I'd like to get some personal perspectives on Hong Kong form both a sartorialist and food perspective.

The plan is to spend 6 nights there in late October and I've already pencilled in visits to:

- Uniqlo
- The Armoury
- WW Chan (may be combined with the above - firing off some enquiries as we speak)

In addition to this Ms Smeggett and myself have set ourselves a challenge to sample the (nominal) 8 schools of chinese cooking when there, so any recommendations for restaurants offering different cuisines would be appreciated. We'll be staying near TST, so anything Kowloon, Mongkok, Causeway Bay, etc is infinitely do-able.

PS: fxh - I'm enjoying reading your observations on academic dress. It's bringing back plenty of memories, not least of which is the flanny shirts and track pants I used to amble about in back in my uni days... shog[1].gif

 

ascot chang?

post #33935 of 52382
Hey guys,

Found my best fitting khakis today at DJ's went ahead and bought them as they where perfect! Went one to google this pant to see if I could buy some...... As luck would have it they've been discontinued frown.gif
Oh and ElBulli closed.....2 years ago! Fuck me.....this is what I get for not paying attention to cooking for a couple years.....

Safe to say I had an ok day today frown.gif

Edit: Vey awesome discussion on 'Aussie Ivy'! Keep it coming guys!
post #33936 of 52382
Bunny, what size are you?
post #33937 of 52382
Usually 34-36; but RL had some crazy vanity sizing and these awesome fitting khakis came to 32...WTF!
post #33938 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by nabilmust View Post

Brown + White + Blue + Grey today.

 

God, this weather is awesome.

 

 

 

Nabil - this is outstanding. Great photo, great outfit, superb colours.

 

Re: Uni dress. I think PR should dress down a bit if that's what he feels is appropriate. A jacket and trousers is not the only clean cut, professional and acceptable outfit, despite CM tendencies. However, I have to say I find it almost unbelievable how much people seem to care what members wea (as in stories of those members who work at Universities being questioned about their dress).

post #33939 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

However, I have to say I find it almost unbelievable how much people seem to care what members wear (as in stories of those members who work at Universities being questioned about their dress).

Me too. Mind boggling.
post #33940 of 52382
It's just clothes. Seriously. It's all good to give a shit about how you present yourself to the outside world but does it require one to be pensive? Too many rules and guidelines happening.
post #33941 of 52382

No one seems to like French Cuffs on SF, is this just an American thing? I'm still at uni and starting to build my wardrobe for internships and interviews down the track and wondering if I will ever within the next 5 years require a french cuff shirt.

post #33942 of 52382
Lord we beseech thee to drive a stake through the heart of the infidels and ensure that the Wallabies triumph tonight. And as the lyrics go 'in the jungle the mighty jungle the Lions weep tonight'

Have some very nice South Australian Shiraz on hand to wash down home made pizza and as the game rolls on. Mind you in George we trust. Let the game begin (or I will end up pissed before kick off at this rate)
post #33943 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by acinod View Post

No one seems to like French Cuffs on SF, is this just an American thing? I'm still at uni and starting to build my wardrobe for internships and interviews down the track and wondering if I will ever within the next 5 years require a french cuff shirt.

Nobody ever 'requires' a french cuff shirt, it's just nice to mix it up. The nicest thing about french cuffs is having nice cufflinks to wear.

Like they say, variety is the spice of life.
post #33944 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by acinod View Post

No one seems to like French Cuffs on SF, is this just an American thing? I'm still at uni and starting to build my wardrobe for internships and interviews down the track and wondering if I will ever within the next 5 years require a french cuff shirt.

(1) French cuffs are often seen as flashy and therefore not appropriate for young guys (ie most of SF)
(2) they aren't as versatile as they can only be worn with a suit.

I don't think you need them.
post #33945 of 52382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

(1) French cuffs are often seen as flashy and therefore not appropriate for young guys (ie most of SF)
m.

Why do you people phrase your own subjective opinions as if they are universal truths?
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