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Australian Members - Page 2260

post #33886 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Carter View Post
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


It's probably worth pointing out that a Loake 1880 and C&J bench grade would be within about 10 pounds of each other at a wholesale cost, which would all be in leather quality. If you think about it they are both made in England, with the same technique, staff would get paid around the same and other manufacturing costs about the same. So to me it's not that surprising, and I think $400 AUD is perfectly reasonable for a B&M store where you can try them on. Loakes are very underrated shoes at the 1880 level.

I don't thnk we should speculate whether loake do or don't use a distributor here, probably not given they only have about 10 accounts in OZ but who knows.

If you think about it, it costs around $75 to ship a pair of shoes back to the uk if they don't fit, which blows the majority of the saving of buying from the likes of herring etc. of course if you know your size etc then that a different story. But it may surprise to learn that some people still value good service, being able to be fitted etc for shoes and are happy to pay for it.

At the end of the day you vote with your wallet but if B&M stores never get any support, then they won't exist at all, which would be sad.

In conclusion, your bank probably rips you off a hell of a lot more every month than your local loake stocking shoe store (DJ's not included).

 

 

From what I've read, the main difference between a Loake and C&J etc is that the sole is stitched aloft as opposed to being bevelled which is the more arduous process. I can't see the leather quality being that much better if it has to go through an A4 machine, I could be wrong though. 

 

FWIW, Cresta in Chippendale own the Australian distribution. Their site advertises the overseas corrected grain models exclusively. 

post #33887 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Carter View Post

It's probably worth pointing out that a Loake 1880 and C&J bench grade would be within about 10 pounds of each other at a wholesale cost, which would all be in leather quality. If you think about it they are both made in England, with the same technique, staff would get paid around the same and other manufacturing costs about the same. So to me it's not that surprising, and I think $400 AUD is perfectly reasonable for a B&M store where you can try them on. Loakes are very underrated shoes at the 1880 level.

I don't thnk we should speculate whether loake do or don't use a distributor here, probably not given they only have about 10 accounts in OZ but who knows.

If you think about it, it costs around $75 to ship a pair of shoes back to the uk if they don't fit, which blows the majority of the saving of buying from the likes of herring etc. of course if you know your size etc then that a different story. But it may surprise to learn that some people still value good service, being able to be fitted etc for shoes and are happy to pay for it.

Only 10 pounds?! Their RRP difference is like 150 pounds!
post #33888 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

You really need to understand how a business is operated. They buy the shoes, pay for it, or at most 30 days credit.  It gets onto a ship (faster by plane, but the costs is way higher), they pay for freight, and the shoes gets here in one or two months. Then they pay custom clearance fees, and pay for transport to get the shoes to the shop.  Then they need to unpack the shipment, check for defects, tag and price, then put on display. Then they wait for you to come in, and in the meantime, pay for marketing, rent, electricity and whiskeys. You buy them, months later, which is when they finally get their cash, of which the government get 10% GST. Over all these months, they have to pay interest on funds employed or at least account for the costs of capital outlaid. Then they get their profit, of which they need to plow it back again to repeat the whole cycle. 

The inventory turnover is low, and capital requirements are high.  Very different if you are Woolies, where you get paid even before you have to pay the farmer.

Would you do all of this for 10% net profit margins?

Agree with almost everything here, except for your comment re GST. The government does not get 10% GST of retail, because the vendor can claim back the GST paid on the expenses incurred in getting the shoes to you.
post #33889 of 54919
^ You can charge that much extra when you have such high demand for your products.

Today....





Coat: Riviera
Shirt: Kamakura
Tie: Henry Carter dark blue knit
Trousers: Henry Carter super dooper single pleated, side adjusted, higher rised, made in Italy mid grey flannel pre-production samples.
Shoes: Carmina burgundy derbies
post #33890 of 54919
Today:



post #33891 of 54919
Nice shine mate
post #33892 of 54919
Good to meet Matt and catch up with some of the other guys last night at the Supper Club. Matt, I went home and finished a book, just to make sure you don't get too far ahead. smile.gif
post #33893 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by nabilmust View Post

I'd skip the ambergold because it looks too.. Timberland-ish (when rappers used to wear them).

 

Sand Suede, or as Olli said, chocolate suede. Can't go wrong with either. 

 

Personally, I'd go for the sand suede as it's a casual shoe. 

 

Sand > Brown 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

A business needs more than 15% net profit to survive, need a least 40% to 50% gross profit to be a good business to have.

I think you are confusing net profit and gross profit - most retail businesses do not have more than 15% net profit .. between 5-10% is the norm.

 

Gross profit varies depending on the type of business (i.e. discretionary vs staple) and the volumes. Discretionary retail businesses is not uncommon to have 60-80% first gross margins and 40-50% gross margin after markdown (Cue, CR, Just Jeans etc).

 

You would then have something like 10-15% labour costs, 15% rent costs and up to 10% in other/admin costs which brings yours net profit back to the 5-10% range. The swing factor is the markdown - the biggest cost in retail is actually going from your first margin to your final gross margin.

post #33894 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Good to meet Matt and catch up with some of the other guys last night at the Supper Club. Matt, I went home and finished a book, just to make sure you don't get too far ahead. smile.gif

Shame I wasn't in town yesterday or I would have tried to rock along. Always good to meet another guitarist/sartorialist :-)
post #33895 of 54919
Crappy pics, sorry.

9210234025_2e9bb5b866.jpg
9213018396_440e84b0d7.jpg

Coat: Versace
Sweater: R&B
Shirt: Brooks Brothers
Tie: Canali
Slacks: Paul Smith
Shoes: Edward Green
post #33896 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Today:




Gerry are those Carminas? Lovely.

Great to catch up with CD and Gerry and meet LonerMatt and Coxaca last night at Supper Club.
post #33897 of 54919
Those are EG Dovers
post #33898 of 54919
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post


Gerry are those Carminas? Lovely.

Great to catch up with CD and Gerry and meet LonerMatt and Coxaca last night at Supper Club.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gyasih View Post

Those are EG Dovers

 

 

Those are indeed EG Dovers - welcome to the Aussie Members thread, gyasih!

 

It definitely was a nice catch up yesterday. Hope some more people can come along to the next one.

post #33899 of 54919
I've been lurking for awhile, Mate.
post #33900 of 54919

Great job getting the Dovers their first wear! Hope they're as sexy IRL as I thought they where......needa get me some T_T

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