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post #30511 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Suburban eatery Attica, in Ripponlea, Melbourne, makes world's top 50

by: John Lethlean
From: The Australian
April 30, 2013 6:50AM

A TINY Melbourne restaurant has had a meteoric rise in the international rankings that recognise the industry's most creative souls.

Attica, in the suburb of Ripponlea, has burst into the World's 50 Best Restaurants list at number 21 after years of knocking on the door. (See Attica's entry in The Australian's Hot 50 here.)

It is a staggering rise from its 2012 ranking of 63. Attica is run by Australia's most talked about chef - internationally - Ben Shewry, a New Zealander.

Speaking from London, Shewry told The Australian he and his business partner David Maccora were "completely stunned."

"They kept counting down from 50 and all these people just started turning round to look at us as it kept going... It was quite surreal."

"Obviously it is pretty amazing for us but you've also got to realise this may be the only time it happens, so while we will cherish the moment, you can't get carried away with it. "

Shewry said he planned to attend a few after-parties "but to tell you the truth, my idea of partying is a bit tame." He and Maccora planned to visit a few restaurants in the UK for a bit of quiet celebration before flying home Thursday.

Conversely Sydney's Quay (Hot 50 entry here) has, according to the ratings system contrived by British trade magazine Restaurant and now seen as the international arbiter of culinary cool, slipped 19 places, to 48, from the previous year.

Quay chef Peter Gilmore, speaking from London, remained upbeat. "We're really thrilled to still be on the list after five years," said the veteran of the Guildhall event.

"But the really big congratulations go to Ben at Attica... long overdue, we're thrilled for him."

We're not Spain, the US or even Scandinavia, but this morning's announcement in London was welcome recognition of Australia's maturing restaurant scene. For the first time since early last decade, two Australian restaurants are in the coveted 50 Best Restaurants list.

Not since early last decade, when Sydney's Tetsuya's and Rockpool were both routinely included on the 11-year old ranking system, has Australia boasted more than one restaurant on the list.

There was more good news for Australia this morning: Nahm, in Bangkok, run by Australian chef David Thompson, moved up the list 18 places, to 32; The Ledbury, a London restaurant co-owned and run by Newcastle native Brett Graham, moved up one place to 13 on the list, the highest ranked restaurant in the world with an Australian chef. And Momofuku Seiobo (see our review, giving it 4.5 out of 5, here), an American-owned restaurant at Star, Sydney, debuted on the list at 89.

According to the sometimes contentious rankings, Noma, in Copenhagen, which has had a stranglehold on the title of "world's best restaurant" for three years, can no longer make the boast. The restaurant run by Spain's Roca brothers - El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona, moved from second into the coveted Number One spot this morning.

The slide down the slippery pole of the list's system of international jurors for Sydney's Quay is perplexing.

Quay joined the elite in 2009, with a debut 0f 46. That year, it joined Tetsuya's at 17. But by the following year's list, Quay had leapfrogged Tetsuya's to a near-peak at 27, while the Japanese-inspired luxury restaurant slipped to 39. A measure, perhaps, of food fashionability, Tetsuya's has gone from the Top 100 altogether. Tetsuya Wakuda's Singapore restaurant, where dinner and a drink will cost you $500 a head, has also suffered a mighty slide, going from 39 last year to 68 for 2013.

Marque, in Surry Hills (our review: 4.5 out of 5), has gone out the back door of the list too, from 61 last year. Its owner and chef, Mark Best, was sanguine. "That's show biz," he said. "I'm Incredibly proud of Ben. He has a wonderful, original story to tell and being in Riponlea has ironically turned into the restaurant's major asset. Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy"

But at the top of the tree, it really been a matter of shuffling the deck chairs.

According to the list, New York's Eleven Madison Park, run by Swiss born chef Daniel Humm, is now the best restaurant in the US; it leapt five spots from 10 last year.

2013 Top 5
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
Eleven Madison Park (New York, USA)

2012 top 5
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
D.O.M (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)

I tried to get into Noma during my Scandinavian holiday last year. Even with 3-4 months warning, they were still booked out. In the middle of the Northern winter, too.
post #30512 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWraith View Post

Well done, sir. Your boots look excellent. Definitely one of the best places to get decent quality at a low price. I'll be getting all my shoes from Shanghai Tianzi from now on. They've nailed things three times for me now. A nice monkstrap next I think smile.gif

Talking with Bonita is done how? I seem to recall emailing her once with a picture but she could not seem to open a flickr photo.

What is the process for sending all the deets? Snail mail? eg foot diagram yer actual snaps of the shoes to be copied? Etc

Or is there some online system that works?
post #30513 of 54938
I emailed Bonita everything. English is not her native language, so a little patience is required but I've not had any problems.
post #30514 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Suburban eatery Attica, in Ripponlea, Melbourne, makes world's top 50
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
by: John Lethlean
From: The Australian
April 30, 2013 6:50AM

A TINY Melbourne restaurant has had a meteoric rise in the international rankings that recognise the industry's most creative souls.

Attica, in the suburb of Ripponlea, has burst into the World's 50 Best Restaurants list at number 21 after years of knocking on the door. (See Attica's entry in The Australian's Hot 50 here.)

It is a staggering rise from its 2012 ranking of 63. Attica is run by Australia's most talked about chef - internationally - Ben Shewry, a New Zealander.

Speaking from London, Shewry told The Australian he and his business partner David Maccora were "completely stunned."

"They kept counting down from 50 and all these people just started turning round to look at us as it kept going... It was quite surreal."

"Obviously it is pretty amazing for us but you've also got to realise this may be the only time it happens, so while we will cherish the moment, you can't get carried away with it. "

Shewry said he planned to attend a few after-parties "but to tell you the truth, my idea of partying is a bit tame." He and Maccora planned to visit a few restaurants in the UK for a bit of quiet celebration before flying home Thursday.

Conversely Sydney's Quay (Hot 50 entry here) has, according to the ratings system contrived by British trade magazine Restaurant and now seen as the international arbiter of culinary cool, slipped 19 places, to 48, from the previous year.

Quay chef Peter Gilmore, speaking from London, remained upbeat. "We're really thrilled to still be on the list after five years," said the veteran of the Guildhall event.

"But the really big congratulations go to Ben at Attica... long overdue, we're thrilled for him."

We're not Spain, the US or even Scandinavia, but this morning's announcement in London was welcome recognition of Australia's maturing restaurant scene. For the first time since early last decade, two Australian restaurants are in the coveted 50 Best Restaurants list.

Not since early last decade, when Sydney's Tetsuya's and Rockpool were both routinely included on the 11-year old ranking system, has Australia boasted more than one restaurant on the list.

There was more good news for Australia this morning: Nahm, in Bangkok, run by Australian chef David Thompson, moved up the list 18 places, to 32; The Ledbury, a London restaurant co-owned and run by Newcastle native Brett Graham, moved up one place to 13 on the list, the highest ranked restaurant in the world with an Australian chef. And Momofuku Seiobo (see our review, giving it 4.5 out of 5, here), an American-owned restaurant at Star, Sydney, debuted on the list at 89.

According to the sometimes contentious rankings, Noma, in Copenhagen, which has had a stranglehold on the title of "world's best restaurant" for three years, can no longer make the boast. The restaurant run by Spain's Roca brothers - El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona, moved from second into the coveted Number One spot this morning.

The slide down the slippery pole of the list's system of international jurors for Sydney's Quay is perplexing.

Quay joined the elite in 2009, with a debut 0f 46. That year, it joined Tetsuya's at 17. But by the following year's list, Quay had leapfrogged Tetsuya's to a near-peak at 27, while the Japanese-inspired luxury restaurant slipped to 39. A measure, perhaps, of food fashionability, Tetsuya's has gone from the Top 100 altogether. Tetsuya Wakuda's Singapore restaurant, where dinner and a drink will cost you $500 a head, has also suffered a mighty slide, going from 39 last year to 68 for 2013.

Marque, in Surry Hills (our review: 4.5 out of 5), has gone out the back door of the list too, from 61 last year. Its owner and chef, Mark Best, was sanguine. "That's show biz," he said. "I'm Incredibly proud of Ben. He has a wonderful, original story to tell and being in Riponlea has ironically turned into the restaurant's major asset. Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy"

But at the top of the tree, it really been a matter of shuffling the deck chairs.

According to the list, New York's Eleven Madison Park, run by Swiss born chef Daniel Humm, is now the best restaurant in the US; it leapt five spots from 10 last year.

2013 Top 5
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
Eleven Madison Park (New York, USA)

2012 top 5
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
D.O.M (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)


Quite a leap, and well done to Attica.

There's no doubt, however, that there's a lot of "trendiness" in fine dining and that restaurants which fail to follow - or to set - trends will end up sliding down these ranking tables.

[Rant]

Something that also frustrates me is that a lot of these rankings are very Euro- and Western-biased. At least the Michelin guide travels to Asian countries and awards stars to restaurants in HK and Japan but many of these other rankings seem to concentrate on Europe and other Western countries (or those countries which are Western-influenced, such as South America) and almost ignore Asian restaurants.

Admittedly, I have a big interest in Japan and Asia, but I do find it a bit irritating that Euro restaurants that carry on about foraging, growing their own ingredients, buying locally and so on are hitting the headlines around the world, and yet there are fantastic restaurants in (for example) Kyoto that have been doing just that for decades (or centuries, in the case of the food at some Japanese inns) that don't get any mention in such rankings, with the exception of the Michelin guide.

Interestingly (although I could be wrong in this impression) it seems to me that a lot of the current trends in haute cuisine owe something to Japanese "kaiseki" cuisine - a pre-determined (degustation-style) menu of small dishes of seasonal, typically local produce, very carefully arranged and beautifully decorated, served in a particular order set by the chef.

I know that the Michelin guide is criticised for being too conservative - taking too long to award stars to fine restaurants, and also taking too long to downgrade restaurants that have faded in quality - but it seems surprising that in a list of the world's top 100 restaurants, there are only three restaurants from Japan - the same number as from from Australia. I realise that Michelin does not publish a guide for Australia and thus this is an inexact comparison, but it seems a bit ridiculous that Japan, a country that has 32 restaurants with three Michelin stars, more than any other country, only gets three restaurants in this top 100 list.

[/Rant]
Edited by Journeyman - 4/29/13 at 8:26pm
post #30515 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Haha, be prepared to have these guys incinerate your entire wardrobe tongue.gif

That's only if he gets off lightly. I reckon even Nice Guy Mr Nelson would snot him if he spotted those Marlows. A man can take only so much.
post #30516 of 54938
AussieJake, that was admittedly a typo - I'm typing on my iPad and meant $265 (inc. postage AND shoe trees).
post #30517 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post


I tried to get into Noma during my Scandinavian holiday last year. Even with 3-4 months warning, they were still booked out. In the middle of the Northern winter, too.

 

While it was open, you statistically had a better chance to get into Harvard B School than into elBulli.

 

Then they decided: why not invite Ferian Adria as a guest professor.

post #30518 of 54938

Id rather go to Jiro's

post #30519 of 54938
Can't believe Souvlaki Hut didn't make the cut. Obviously rigged. Why get potato in earth when you can get a double meat souvvvv?!
post #30520 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post

Id rather go to Jiro's


I've not been, but some of my friends who live in Tokyo have.

The general feeling is that compared to some other sushi places in Tokyo, it is over-priced and Jiro can be quite rude if you are not Japanese.

If anyone's interested, I've been to Sushi Mizutani, a restaurant run by a former apprentice of Jiro's, and I can recommend it highly. It was excellent and about half the price of Sukiyabashi Jiro in Ginza. Lunch is cheaper than dinner (as is common at many Japanese restaurants).
Edited by Journeyman - 4/29/13 at 9:26pm
post #30521 of 54938
I've noticed that MJ Bale has started mixing poly into a few of their products. Is this a worrying sign? Gant Rugger did the same thing a few years back: built up the customer base, then suddenly their crew necks that were 100% wool of 100% cotton the year before were 50/50 blends.

http://www.mjbale.com/whats-new/knight-navy-jacket ($595!)
http://www.mjbale.com/clothing/coats-and-jackets/coats/silberberg-tobacco-coat
http://www.mjbale.com/clothing/coats-and-jackets/coats/silberberg-navy-coat
http://www.mjbale.com/whats-new/keating-denim-coat

Their rain macs last year were 100% cotton at the same price (GN and I both own one).

I know that there is a lot of nice poly out there and it doesn't deserve to be condemned purely on the fact that it's synthetic (and it is quite useful for waterproofing in things like rain macs), but still.
post #30522 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Suburban eatery Attica, in Ripponlea, Melbourne, makes world's top 50

There was more good news for Australia this morning: Nahm, in Bangkok, run by Australian chef David Thompson, moved up the list 18 places, to 32; T

One of thing's I miss about Sydney is no David Thompson I used to go to Daley St Thai and then when he opened Nahm (i think it was called that) in Bayswater Rd I have a hard back of Thai food which has provided some inspired dishes over the years.
post #30523 of 54938
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Can't believe Souvlaki Hut didn't make the cut. Obviously rigged. Why get potato in earth when you can get a double meat souvvvv?!

Could be the reviewer has to stay sober?
post #30524 of 54938
^^ Good call, good call. Just wanna make sure there's no bias against Koutoufides...
post #30525 of 54938
Quote:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Originally Posted by meister View Post

Suburban eatery Attica, in Ripponlea, Melbourne, makes world's top 50

by: John Lethlean
From: The Australian
April 30, 2013 6:50AM

A TINY Melbourne restaurant has had a meteoric rise in the international rankings that recognise the industry's most creative souls.

Attica, in the suburb of Ripponlea, has burst into the World's 50 Best Restaurants list at number 21 after years of knocking on the door. (See Attica's entry in The Australian's Hot 50 here.)

It is a staggering rise from its 2012 ranking of 63. Attica is run by Australia's most talked about chef - internationally - Ben Shewry, a New Zealander.

Speaking from London, Shewry told The Australian he and his business partner David Maccora were "completely stunned."

"They kept counting down from 50 and all these people just started turning round to look at us as it kept going... It was quite surreal."

"Obviously it is pretty amazing for us but you've also got to realise this may be the only time it happens, so while we will cherish the moment, you can't get carried away with it. "

Shewry said he planned to attend a few after-parties "but to tell you the truth, my idea of partying is a bit tame." He and Maccora planned to visit a few restaurants in the UK for a bit of quiet celebration before flying home Thursday.

Conversely Sydney's Quay (Hot 50 entry here) has, according to the ratings system contrived by British trade magazine Restaurant and now seen as the international arbiter of culinary cool, slipped 19 places, to 48, from the previous year.

Quay chef Peter Gilmore, speaking from London, remained upbeat. "We're really thrilled to still be on the list after five years," said the veteran of the Guildhall event.

"But the really big congratulations go to Ben at Attica... long overdue, we're thrilled for him."

We're not Spain, the US or even Scandinavia, but this morning's announcement in London was welcome recognition of Australia's maturing restaurant scene. For the first time since early last decade, two Australian restaurants are in the coveted 50 Best Restaurants list.

Not since early last decade, when Sydney's Tetsuya's and Rockpool were both routinely included on the 11-year old ranking system, has Australia boasted more than one restaurant on the list.

There was more good news for Australia this morning: Nahm, in Bangkok, run by Australian chef David Thompson, moved up the list 18 places, to 32; The Ledbury, a London restaurant co-owned and run by Newcastle native Brett Graham, moved up one place to 13 on the list, the highest ranked restaurant in the world with an Australian chef. And Momofuku Seiobo (see our review, giving it 4.5 out of 5, here), an American-owned restaurant at Star, Sydney, debuted on the list at 89.

According to the sometimes contentious rankings, Noma, in Copenhagen, which has had a stranglehold on the title of "world's best restaurant" for three years, can no longer make the boast. The restaurant run by Spain's Roca brothers - El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona, moved from second into the coveted Number One spot this morning.

The slide down the slippery pole of the list's system of international jurors for Sydney's Quay is perplexing.

Quay joined the elite in 2009, with a debut 0f 46. That year, it joined Tetsuya's at 17. But by the following year's list, Quay had leapfrogged Tetsuya's to a near-peak at 27, while the Japanese-inspired luxury restaurant slipped to 39. A measure, perhaps, of food fashionability, Tetsuya's has gone from the Top 100 altogether. Tetsuya Wakuda's Singapore restaurant, where dinner and a drink will cost you $500 a head, has also suffered a mighty slide, going from 39 last year to 68 for 2013.

Marque, in Surry Hills (our review: 4.5 out of 5), has gone out the back door of the list too, from 61 last year. Its owner and chef, Mark Best, was sanguine. "That's show biz," he said. "I'm Incredibly proud of Ben. He has a wonderful, original story to tell and being in Riponlea has ironically turned into the restaurant's major asset. Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy"

But at the top of the tree, it really been a matter of shuffling the deck chairs.

According to the list, New York's Eleven Madison Park, run by Swiss born chef Daniel Humm, is now the best restaurant in the US; it leapt five spots from 10 last year.

2013 Top 5
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
Eleven Madison Park (New York, USA)

2012 top 5
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
D.O.M (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)

 

I was fortunate enough to eat at Attica in January this year. It was the best dining experience I have ever had. Extremely affordable and the service was exceptional. I had a lengthy conversation with Ben in his garden. A truly outstanding man, with a great deal of talent.

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