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Australian Members - Page 2034

post #30496 of 58046
Thanks for the post guys, I will check out TM Lewin.

I like the look of Bailey Nelson and am in the market for some Sunnies. What are the style rules concerning them? Anything to avoid for certain types of people?

And lastly what do you guys think of Julius Marlow shoes? Have two pairs and thinking of investing in a third. What would be the next logical option? I have semi pointed black lace ups and fairly square toed dark brown loafers.
post #30497 of 58046
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post


What a crock of (pick favourite animal) manure. I have worn glasses since I was three and seen them go through many styles and social, cultural changes over the years. I note that in the mid 80's a lot of Lux brands stepped up to the plate and started making fashion eyewear and that was then hi jacked by the better living by design crowd where glasses became face furniture and a personal statement, ergo who you are and how you want the world to perceive you.

I have gone through periods late teens to 30's where my main frame were ENH Ripleys and fuck Thomas Dolby I say.

Back in the late 80's mid 90's I used to wear Anglo- American frames made in England but then they closed shop, it reopened in the early 2000' s I think but they are hard to find here and quality is no longer. One thing I have noticed is that in the past ten years there has been a limited choice of frames available at particular times for example Prodesign and a lot of other brands produced combo glasses of metal and acetate this was the trend for a number of years. I wore Emanuel Ungaro metal frames for a while but after a year the model was discontinued and it was impossible to find a replacement temple.

LaFont countered the metal plastic trend producing a line of all acetate frames.Then around 2006-7 the NASA inspired heavy black acetate make a big come back and its large Buddy Holly frame which was embraced by Hipsters in particular (fuckers).

At one stage it took me 24 months to find an appropriate Le Corbusier style frame. I don't pay ridiculous amounts for my frames $350-400 on average, with my Moscot sunglasses the cost was in the dyeing, grinding and coating of hi index lenses. Currently my specs last at least three or four years, this depends on whether my script needs adjusting and for the last couple of years its stable. As I pointed out earlier the real killer is that the price of hi index lens has gone through the roof in the past five years. Firms such as Sneeking Duck are able to provide a stock lens which is in the middle minus -5 these do not cost as much to produce as a -6 or -7 and they flog cheap knockoff frames from China, for those who would like to know more I would recommend the article Made in China in GRANTA 89.

And lastly getting glasses is a bit like MTM you need to go into a store try a frame on see how it sits on your face and most importantly if its right for your script. One thing for those that wear glasses the wife bought me a book years ago Spectacles published by Chic Simple its full of good photographs and nerd type information worth getting a copy if its still in print.

End of rant.

 

 

I'm ah, not exactly sure what I said that justified this rant? Did I say anything that disagreed with any of this?

post #30498 of 58046
Archer, I wouldn't buy another pair of Julius Marlow shoes. Admittedly, I've not seen them lately, but assuming that's what you're willing or able to spend on shoes (dollar wise), I'd opt for Loake (1880 is preferable), Meermin or other such entry-level brands into fine shoemaking.

I'm stopping by the Bailey Nelson pop-up later today, happy to share my thoughts with you afterwards.
post #30499 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archer View Post

And lastly what do you guys think of Julius Marlow shoes? Have two pairs and thinking of investing in a third. What would be the next logical option? I have semi pointed black lace ups and fairly square toed dark brown loafers.

Please avoid if at all possible, although some of their suede shoes look reasonable and it's pretty difficult to stuff up suede.

I realise that style is subjective, but most of the Julius Marlow shoes look pretty awful and they are poor quality, too - cheap leather and glued soles. Essentially, they are disposable shoes that you wear until they wear out and then throw them away and get another pair.
post #30500 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

D-Red - An interesting post. I agree in some ways, but disagree in others.

1) Yes, there are some people on SF, as in the real world, who like or who laud Ray-Ban or Persol as the best or most desirable sunglasses. However, there are also a great many people who either prefer other brands, or who trawl eBay and other corners of the internet for those "pre-Luxottica-buyout" versions of classic Persol frames. I must admit that I'm not at all sure whether the quality of Persols were higher before Luxottica took over, but it's certainly a fact that there are people out there who do prefer the older Persol frames and who refuse to buy them new, now that they are part of the Luxottica stable.
While I have a pair of 649s, I generally wear these "no name" Italian sunnies.



I have a quite a big nose so I have trouble finding sunnies with a bridge width ≥23 mm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

2) I certainly do agree that there is an irony inherent in the fact that, whilst SF members are prepared to laud clothing made by an unknown MTO operation as long as it is well-fitted, regardless of cost, those same members will go gaga over a Panerai, vintage Rolex GMT II, PP Nautilus, Breitling Navitimer, AP Royal Oak or similar, where the cost of the watch is out of all proportion to the cost of producing it and a lot of the price is simply for the name or symbol on the dial.
Part of the reason for that is that many watch collectors deliberately look for watches that will hold their value when they come to sell it down the track. Personally I'm not a disciple of the "buy a watch as an investment" school, but I understand why many are. The value inherent in certain brands (Rolex, PP, IWC etc.) means that you can both enjoy a watch and also have the option to recoup or even make money down the line if you look after it. Because they are so well known, the potential number of buyers (and fanboys) is greater, which keeps prices high. Unfortunately, lesser known brands just don't hold their value as well, even if they share many of the components of their more famous cousins.
post #30501 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


Please avoid if at all possible, although some of their suede shoes look reasonable and it's pretty difficult to stuff up suede.

I realise that style is subjective, but most of the Julius Marlow shoes look pretty awful and they are poor quality, too - cheap leather and glued soles. Essentially, they are disposable shoes that you wear until they wear out and then throw them away and get another pair.

 

The Gillette effect of mainstream australian menswear!

post #30502 of 58046
Sure, thanks Brownman. I'm pretty new to the sphere so aside from "they look nice" I don't understand much in the way of quality indicators.

Re shoes: loud and clear. I've always been hesitant to order online with shoes because I've always had trouble - some UK 12's fit while other UK 13's fit. Matter of trial and error I guess. Loake look beautiful. I'll check it out. And thank you.
post #30503 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Loake Pimlico Dark Brown Suede chukka boots in size 8.5F from the 1880 collection, brand new in box with Herring cedar trees, beautiful last shape (Capital last)

$270 shipped anywhere in Au - PM me smile.gif

Doh, half a size too big!
post #30504 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by DartagnanRed View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


I'm ah, not exactly sure what I said that justified this rant? Did I say anything that disagreed with any of this?

Eyewear - "SF approved" I suspect that a lot of the loyalty to ridiculously priced prescription frames

Sufficient if you ask me
post #30505 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


Please avoid if at all possible, although some of their suede shoes look reasonable and it's pretty difficult to stuff up suede.

I realise that style is subjective, but most of the Julius Marlow shoes look pretty awful and they are poor quality, too - cheap leather and glued soles. Essentially, they are disposable shoes that you wear until they wear out and then throw them away and get another pair.

 

 

+1 Julius Marlow ... the use of "leather" is debatable

 

 

for eyewear i like Lunor, Moscot, Persol and TBM raves about C+G EDIT: Also check out CW Dixey & Son - http://www.cwdixeyandson.com/range.php

 

 

 

And back a few pages on books - anyone ever seen a James Dean hardcover coffee table book? 

post #30506 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archer View Post

Thanks for the post guys, I will check out TM Lewin.

I like the look of Bailey Nelson and am in the market for some Sunnies. What are the style rules concerning them? Anything to avoid for certain types of people?

And lastly what do you guys think of Julius Marlow shoes? Have two pairs and thinking of investing in a third. What would be the next logical option? I have semi pointed black lace ups and fairly square toed dark brown loafers.

Stomach-churningly dreadful. But don't worry, we're here to help.
post #30507 of 58046
Haha, be prepared to have these guys incinerate your entire wardrobe tongue.gif
post #30508 of 58046

Also, wait, are Bailey Nelson a Warby Parker rip off or is that the Australian branch of the brand?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Loake Pimlico Dark Brown Suede chukka boots in size 8.5F from the 1880 collection, brand new in box with Herring cedar trees, beautiful last shape (Capital last)

$270 shipped anywhere in Au - PM me smile.gif

They go for ~$245 from the usual UK websites, isn't $270 shipped overs?

post #30509 of 58046
Suburban eatery Attica, in Ripponlea, Melbourne, makes world's top 50

by: John Lethlean
From: The Australian
April 30, 2013 6:50AM

A TINY Melbourne restaurant has had a meteoric rise in the international rankings that recognise the industry's most creative souls.

Attica, in the suburb of Ripponlea, has burst into the World's 50 Best Restaurants list at number 21 after years of knocking on the door. (See Attica's entry in The Australian's Hot 50 here.)

It is a staggering rise from its 2012 ranking of 63. Attica is run by Australia's most talked about chef - internationally - Ben Shewry, a New Zealander.

Speaking from London, Shewry told The Australian he and his business partner David Maccora were "completely stunned."

"They kept counting down from 50 and all these people just started turning round to look at us as it kept going... It was quite surreal."

"Obviously it is pretty amazing for us but you've also got to realise this may be the only time it happens, so while we will cherish the moment, you can't get carried away with it. "

Shewry said he planned to attend a few after-parties "but to tell you the truth, my idea of partying is a bit tame." He and Maccora planned to visit a few restaurants in the UK for a bit of quiet celebration before flying home Thursday.

Conversely Sydney's Quay (Hot 50 entry here) has, according to the ratings system contrived by British trade magazine Restaurant and now seen as the international arbiter of culinary cool, slipped 19 places, to 48, from the previous year.

Quay chef Peter Gilmore, speaking from London, remained upbeat. "We're really thrilled to still be on the list after five years," said the veteran of the Guildhall event.

"But the really big congratulations go to Ben at Attica... long overdue, we're thrilled for him."

We're not Spain, the US or even Scandinavia, but this morning's announcement in London was welcome recognition of Australia's maturing restaurant scene. For the first time since early last decade, two Australian restaurants are in the coveted 50 Best Restaurants list.

Not since early last decade, when Sydney's Tetsuya's and Rockpool were both routinely included on the 11-year old ranking system, has Australia boasted more than one restaurant on the list.

There was more good news for Australia this morning: Nahm, in Bangkok, run by Australian chef David Thompson, moved up the list 18 places, to 32; The Ledbury, a London restaurant co-owned and run by Newcastle native Brett Graham, moved up one place to 13 on the list, the highest ranked restaurant in the world with an Australian chef. And Momofuku Seiobo (see our review, giving it 4.5 out of 5, here), an American-owned restaurant at Star, Sydney, debuted on the list at 89.

According to the sometimes contentious rankings, Noma, in Copenhagen, which has had a stranglehold on the title of "world's best restaurant" for three years, can no longer make the boast. The restaurant run by Spain's Roca brothers - El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona, moved from second into the coveted Number One spot this morning.

The slide down the slippery pole of the list's system of international jurors for Sydney's Quay is perplexing.

Quay joined the elite in 2009, with a debut 0f 46. That year, it joined Tetsuya's at 17. But by the following year's list, Quay had leapfrogged Tetsuya's to a near-peak at 27, while the Japanese-inspired luxury restaurant slipped to 39. A measure, perhaps, of food fashionability, Tetsuya's has gone from the Top 100 altogether. Tetsuya Wakuda's Singapore restaurant, where dinner and a drink will cost you $500 a head, has also suffered a mighty slide, going from 39 last year to 68 for 2013.

Marque, in Surry Hills (our review: 4.5 out of 5), has gone out the back door of the list too, from 61 last year. Its owner and chef, Mark Best, was sanguine. "That's show biz," he said. "I'm Incredibly proud of Ben. He has a wonderful, original story to tell and being in Riponlea has ironically turned into the restaurant's major asset. Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy"

But at the top of the tree, it really been a matter of shuffling the deck chairs.

According to the list, New York's Eleven Madison Park, run by Swiss born chef Daniel Humm, is now the best restaurant in the US; it leapt five spots from 10 last year.

2013 Top 5
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
Eleven Madison Park (New York, USA)

2012 top 5
Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)
El Celler de Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
D.O.M (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Osteria Francensana (Modena, Italy)
post #30510 of 58046
Quote:
Originally Posted by joiji View Post

I love this scale.

Somewhere in here we need "That suit makes you look fat" and "Ethan/Guido/etc looks ridiculous in that getup".
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