or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Australian Members - Page 2003

post #30031 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

Thanks DB!! Wish it were so!

The frames are SALT. Really like them myself!

A Gentleman never tells.... Cheers LM
post #30032 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

I was talking to Gerry the other night about what one is attempting achieve in dressing - once one gets beyond the basics. Notions of attracting people and dressing for a purpose. Perhaps it was also lennier who was talking about dressing up and down for meetings/negotiations depending on purpose. All moderated and mediated depending on (perceived) status/ imputed status / named status/ official status/ status inferred due to age/ experience/reputation etc etc. As we all know it can get complicated the more aware you are.
Rest of post! (Click to show)

Following on; the most important book anyone should own on clothing, or anything, after one has mastered the basics is Stephen Potters: The Theory and Practice of Gamesmanship (or the Art of Winning Games without Actually Cheating) (1947)

It would be useful to get away from what I purchased/ what it costs/ etc etc and it might be useful to ponder the odd framework for examining The Presentation Of Self In Everyday Life ( to mention another basic book on clothing.)

I've alway found Karen Horney's basic triage looking glass of Toward, Against and Away useful for many purposes. Looking at clothing its a useful framework to see what you are trying to do with the way you dress. Are you looking to go toward or bring people toward you, are you looking to push people away or are you looking to clash with or push against people.

Have a think and we can discuss.

Below the fold is a more detailed explanation of Horney's theory from WIKI, couched in terms of neuroses though.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Moving Toward People
1. The need for affection and approval; pleasing others and being liked by them.
2. The need for a partner; one whom they can love and who will solve all problems.

Moving Against People
3. The need for power; the ability to bend wills and achieve control over others—while most persons seek strength, the neurotic may be desperate for it.
4. The need to exploit others; to get the better of them. To become manipulative, fostering the belief that people are there simply to be used.
5. The need for social recognition; prestige and limelight.
6. The need for personal admiration; for both inner and outer qualities—to be valued.
7. The need for personal achievement; though virtually all persons wish to make achievements, as with No. 3, the neurotic may be desperate for achievement.

Moving Away from People
8. The need for self sufficiency and independence; while most desire some autonomy, the neurotic may simply wish to discard other individuals entirely.
9. The need for perfection; while many are driven to perfect their lives in the form of well being, the neurotic may display a fear of being slightly flawed.
10. Lastly, the need to restrict life practices to within narrow borders; to live as inconspicuous a life as possible.

Upon investigating the ten needs further, Horney found she was able to condense them into three broad categories:

Compliance Needs one and two were assimilated into the "compliance" category. This category is seen as a process of "moving towards people", or self-effacement. Under Horney's theory children facing difficulties with parents often use this strategy. Fear of helplessness and abandonment occurs—phenomena Horney refers to as "basic anxiety". Those within the compliance category tend to exhibit a need for affection and approval on the part of their peers. They may also seek out a partner, somebody to confide in, fostering the belief that, in turn, all of life's problems would be solved by the new cohort. A lack of demands and a desire for inconspicuousness both occur in these individuals.

Aggression Needs three through seven were assimilated into the "aggression" category, also called the "moving against people", or the "expansive" solution. Neurotic children or adults within this category often exhibit anger or basic hostility to those around them. That is, there is a need for power, a need for control and exploitation, and a maintenance of a facade of omnipotence. Manipulative qualities aside, under Horney's assertions the aggressive individual may also wish for social recognition, not necessarily in terms of limelight, but in terms of simply being known (perhaps feared) by subordinates and peers alike. In addition, the individual has needs for a degree of personal admiration by those within this person's social circle and, lastly, for raw personal achievement. These characteristics comprise the "aggressive" neurotic type. Aggressive types also tend to keep people away from them. On the other hand, they only care about their wants and needs. They would do whatever they can to be happy and wouldn't desist from hurting anyone.

Detachment Needs eight through ten were assimilated into the "detachment" category, also called the "moving-away-from" or "resigning" solution or a detached personality. As neither aggression nor compliance solve parental indifference, Horney recognized that children might simply try to become self-sufficient. The withdrawing neurotic may disregard others in a non-aggressive manner, regarding solitude and independence as the way forth. The stringent needs for perfection comprise another part of this category; those withdrawing may strive for perfection above all else, to the point where being flawed is utterly unacceptable. Everything the "detached" type does must be unassailable and refined. They suppress or deny all feelings towards others, particularly love and hate.

Great stuff FXH, I'll get a more thought out response when I digest it fully. As someone who lacks "compliance / moving towards" naturally I really need to be careful with my clothes here (and indeed my general social choices). Sadly I'm not always overly enamored with the aesthetic which makes it hard.

eta: cut quote.
post #30033 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

I'm a 40R and a 9UK... TBM do you take requests for half priced stuff?

;-)

Ditto (although think i may have shrunk to a 38r) over past few months
post #30034 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plestor View Post


Great stuff FXH, I'll get a more thought out response when I digest it fully. As someone who lacks "compliance / moving towards" naturally I really need to be careful with my clothes here (and indeed my general social choices). Sadly I'm not always overly enamored with the aesthetic which makes it hard.

eta: cut quote.

 

I would say that the material, cut and colour all play a part in conveying the "hardness" or "softness" of a particular outfit and the key is to balance them to achieve the effect that you want. The person's face and perhaps their body-type would also come into play here.

 

I would aim for neither extreme but perhaps a middle ground, i.e. a "soft" outfit balanced with elements of "hardness" or vice-versa.

 

As always, once you understand the elements that constitute this framework, it would be interesting to test the effect this has on the people you interact with.

 

Thoughts?

post #30035 of 53897
HC trunk show photos from Ludlows are up on the Shoemakers site now for those interested. Gerry, where are yours?? :-)
post #30036 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plestor View Post

Great stuff FXH, I'll get a more thought out response when I digest it fully. As someone who lacks "compliance / moving towards" naturally I really need to be careful with my clothes here (and indeed my general social choices). Sadly I'm not always overly enamored with the aesthetic which makes it hard.


eta: cut quote.

I would say that the material, cut and colour all play a part in conveying the "hardness" or "softness" of a particular outfit and the key is to balance them to achieve the effect that you want. The person's face and perhaps their body-type would also come into play here.
Being 6'7" (with good posture unless I'm actively trying to avoid it). I find that people are appreciative on anything I can do to soften this. My back tends to regret too much bending down however good it may be for conversations (essential).ffffuuuu.gif Dunno I'd be interested to hear from Brisbane members if they agree with my assessment ; that is that my fits at the time were a touch hard and that my personality and body didn't help either.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

I would aim for neither extreme but perhaps a middle ground, i.e. a "soft" outfit balanced with elements of "hardness" or vice-versa.

As always, once you understand the elements that constitute this framework, it would be interesting to test the effect this has on the people you interact with.

Thoughts?

Firstly I should be clear that an entirely X outfit is sub-par no matter the background and that I'm more-so trying to lean one way over the other. I've been trying to add softer elements to my fits. I'm not sure how much it helps but I'll try to pay more attention.
post #30037 of 53897
Double on edit
post #30038 of 53897

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by lennier View Post

HC trunk show photos from Ludlows are up on the Shoemakers site now for those interested. Gerry, where are yours?? :-)

 

Being edited in between holiday things - heading off to Penang for three days so I'll have them up tonight.

post #30039 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2010 View Post

Just had some time this afternoon. So taken some pictures of my shoes. Below are my Mon-Thurs rotations -




did I count right? 19 pairs? wow. I've got some serious shopping to do!

I noticed that someone else (Romp perhaps? I can't remember) had a ton of either clothing or shoes - where do you guys call keep it all? or do I just have a (too) small place?
post #30040 of 53897
Sorry to those who I promised pics of the MJ Bale suit. Saw a mate's show at the Comedy Festival tonight and lost track of time, so haven't taken the pics yet.

Will send tomorrow smile.gif
post #30041 of 53897
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennier View Post

HC trunk show photos from Ludlows are up on the Shoemakers site now for those interested. Gerry, where are yours?? :-)

 

Right here.

post #30042 of 53897

Just saw the Ludlows on the Shoemakers Of Melbourne blog. Sitting in that chair makes everyone look like they're The Godfather!


Edited by Gerry Nelson - 4/21/13 at 7:20am
post #30043 of 53897
post #30044 of 53897

Shit Jason is a tall bugger. He needs his legs clipped. 

post #30045 of 53897
Quote:

http://www.swellnet.com.au/news/3553-brett-archibald-and-the-code-of-the-sea, has a bit more discussion // background for those that haven't gone on a (surfing) boat trip.

Ps You're missing out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members