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post #29401 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post


Ordinarily I thought shoes had a cork layer to protect vs moisture?
I'm not much of a shoe nerd so maybe someone else can correct me, but yeah I know Goodyear welted shoes have the cork layer but I'm not sure if handwelted ones do as well (which all Meermin LM/MTO are).

Mine are still going very strong and no problems so far, though I haven't had to wear them in the rain at all.
post #29402 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiejake View Post

What width is it, looks to be ~1 inch? I like that buckle too, any idea what it is?

Would bridle leather be better suited for a dress belt with the addition of stitching ? ie. brown or black stitching on a belt like this:




My understanding is that bridle leather is casual due to the thickness. Maybe also due to the non-glossy appearance?

Really struggling to find good quality dress belts that aren't $100+.

Mine is a 1 1/4" belt in Chestnut with the # 107N, bright nickel finish on solid brass buckle.

It's partly the thickness I think, also the edge treatment makes a difference, as does the texture of the leather itself. Put it all together and I think they're too casual for suits (at least the ones I've seen/own), though fine for everything else.

I bought a Brooks Brothers calf leather belt a while back on discount that I'm pretty happy with, but I'm not sure I would totally recommend (the buckle is gold rather than the silver it was in the picture, and the backing is synthetic I think). I know it seems ridiculous/extravagent, but for something you are going to wear day in day out for years, spending $100 is not totally a bad idea imo.
post #29403 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by The False Prophet View Post



Apropos the PS pattern chat: Zegna silk in Prince of Wales check.

tie doesn't do anything for me and the pocket square is too matchy matchy with the tie fabric.

post #29404 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Carter View Post


I'm not much of a shoe nerd so maybe someone else can correct me, but yeah I know Goodyear welted shoes have the cork layer but I'm not sure if handwelted ones do as well (which all Meermin LM/MTO are).

Mine are still going very strong and no problems so far, though I haven't had to wear them in the rain at all.

ROmp is wrong, you are correct.

 

Hand welted, which Meermin's "linea Masetro" and by extension MTO shoes are constructed as, do not have a cork layer.

 

Romp's mistake was letting them air dry for 24Hours, if the inside is still damp, the inside is still damp, not much more to it.

They must have copped one hell of a soaking.

 

All that need to be done is to stuff the shoe full of paper towels to suck out the moisture and once dry tree them and wear them.

post #29405 of 57112
Show this post and could not help but think of fxh

http://lacasuarina.tumblr.com/post/47577461935/things-to-pack-away-for-summer-coats-sweaters

Quote:
Things to pack away for summer :

Coats
Sweaters
Socks

Time to update sexyankles.tumblr.com?
post #29406 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post

I bought a Brooks Brothers calf leather belt a while back on discount that I'm pretty happy with, but I'm not sure I would totally recommend (the buckle is gold rather than the silver it was in the picture, and the backing is synthetic I think). I know it seems ridiculous/extravagent, but for something you are going to wear day in day out for years, spending $100 is not totally a bad idea imo.

I remember you talking about that BB belt and that's why I've stayed away from them.

 

Good point re: wearing it for years.

post #29407 of 57112
Ok guys only just over a week to go until the trunk show is on! Now I know a lot of you that are coming have already rsvp'd and thanks, for any others please if you can send one through to the emails below or PM me. There is of course no obligation to buy anything at all, so don't be shy in coming. We really just need an indication for catering/drinks purposes.

You'll be able to see the whole new collection for A/W which includes -

4 x new pure cashmere knit ties (navy, burgundy, brown & grey)
5 x of the new grenadines and re-stock of the ones that are sold out.
A heap (12 or 13 I think) of new woven 7 folds in various repp stripe and patterned fabrics
5 x new wool 3 fold ties
All the new cashmere scarves up on the site
Smart gloves
Plus the chance to order the new 7 and 3 fold fabrics MTO in custom width and length.

I'll put some teaser pics up early next week leading up to the event.

post #29408 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post

Cankles
I'm not having much lucky with Meermin
Wore my MTO pair this week and unfortunately I got caught out in the rain
Got home took them off, wiped down and let them air dry on their side for 24hrs before treeing them
Then 3 days later I pull them out, untree them and the insole was damp and white fluffy mould started appearing inside... I obviously didn't notice at the time but water came right through the sole and inside. Ordinarily I thought shoes had a cork layer to protect vs moisture? It's not like I walk around much in the wet either.. Probably 10 minutes at most
Disappointing

The cork layer has no particular purpose with regard to stopping water getting in. The cork (midsole) is to provide a filling and malleable bed to adapt to the shape of the bottom of your foot and provide some minimal cushioning. There are other fillings that can be used to achieve this same effect to a greater or lesser degree.

Welting's main advantage is that it provides for an easy and possibly superior way to resole a shoe. Shoes can be stitched by hand or by machine. The machine was invented by Charles Goodyear in the 1860s and provided for an efficient industrial replacement for hand stitching.

The ideal welting (hand or machine stitched) uses a feather that is cut to stand up and cut from the sole but still attached. A lesser method is to simply glue a strip of leather, linen, plastic or material to the sole and use that. The MAJORITY of shoes, even horrendously expensive ones, now use this gemming method.

It is possible that a machine stitched shoe could be STRONGER than hand stitched. Hand stitching is superior in re-soling shoes because it can use the same holes, theoretically allowing resoling an indefinite amount of times, whereas a machine will to a certain extent mash up the upper edges by creating new holes, thus limiting the number of resoles. ( this will be theoretical for some people - if your soles last 5 years and you can resole 3 times with machine then 15 years maybe enough)
{otoh if you are wise and sensible and use a Topy [wink] then you may NEVER need to resole [wink] }

One of the advantages of Goodyear stitching /welting is that the method prevents (or makes it harder) water entering through the stitching on the bottom of the sole. Shoes are obviously vulnerable to water entering through the sides, upper or toes or openings.

As far as water resistance goes there are different forms of stitching a welted shoe that improve water resistance. Norwegian-stitched, norvegese, Reverse welted, double-stitched, triple stitched and more. These generally look more casual and less sleek. Even Goodyear stitched shoes can use different forms of stitching. No stitched leather shoe or boot can be completely water proof. Hence rubber and other material boots.

NB:: (The above is oversimplified and misses some points but a long explanation would be - er, um,...er... long)

Romp - your shoes may not have got wet through the sole but by other entry points. Shoes get wet. They also dry. If dried sensibly they don't show many ill effects. Mould is no big deal. Just make sure they are dry and wipe away mould. If it reappears just use a mould stopper thingo solution.

Shoes get wet, and dry and get worn and get wet ....

I wore RM Williams leather soles leather boots on a farm for years - day in day out, no resting, sometimes worn wet by necessity. Sure they didn't look like a pristine pair of Lobbs but with a bit of dubbin or conditioner and polish they looked fine and lasted years.

Don't stress.
Shoes and clothes are meant to be worn not photographed.

New clothes and shoes never look right. Worn stuff looks better
post #29409 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
...
Shoes get wet, and dry and get worn and get wet ....
...

Don't stress.
Shoes and clothes are meant to be worn not photographed.

New clothes and shoes never look right. Worn stuff looks better

 

+1

 

On a separate note - Reminder:

 

Sydney Meetup Round 2.

 

18 April (Thursday)

6.30 pm onwards

Bavarian Bier Cafe, O'Connell Street

post #29410 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The cork layer has no particular purpose with regard to stopping water getting in. The cork (midsole) is to provide a filling and malleable bed to adapt to the shape of the bottom of your foot and provide some minimal cushioning. There are other fillings that can be used to achieve this same effect to a greater or lesser degree.

Welting's main advantage is that it provides for an easy and possibly superior way to resole a shoe. Shoes can be stitched by hand or by machine. The machine was invented by Charles Goodyear in the 1860s and provided for an efficient industrial replacement for hand stitching.

The ideal welting (hand or machine stitched) uses a feather that is cut to stand up and cut from the sole but still attached. A lesser method is to simply glue a strip of leather, linen, plastic or material to the sole and use that. The MAJORITY of shoes, even horrendously expensive ones, now use this gemming method.

It is possible that a machine stitched shoe could be STRONGER than hand stitched. Hand stitching is superior in re-soling shoes because it can use the same holes, theoretically allowing resoling an indefinite amount of times, whereas a machine will to a certain extent mash up the upper edges by creating new holes, thus limiting the number of resoles. ( this will be theoretical for some people - if your soles last 5 years and you can resole 3 times with machine then 15 years maybe enough)
{otoh if you are wise and sensible and use a Topy [wink] then you may NEVER need to resole [wink] }

One of the advantages of Goodyear stitching /welting is that the method prevents (or makes it harder) water entering through the stitching on the bottom of the sole. Shoes are obviously vulnerable to water entering through the sides, upper or toes or openings.

As far as water resistance goes there are different forms of stitching a welted shoe that improve water resistance. Norwegian-stitched, norvegese, Reverse welted, double-stitched, triple stitched and more. These generally look more casual and less sleek. Even Goodyear stitched shoes can use different forms of stitching. No stitched leather shoe or boot can be completely water proof. Hence rubber and other material boots.

NB:: (The above is oversimplified and misses some points but a long explanation would be - er, um,...er... long)

Romp - your shoes may not have got wet through the sole but by other entry points. Shoes get wet. They also dry. If dried sensibly they don't show many ill effects. Mould is no big deal. Just make sure they are dry and wipe away mould. If it reappears just use a mould stopper thingo solution.

Shoes get wet, and dry and get worn and get wet ....

I wore RM Williams leather soles leather boots on a farm for years - day in day out, no resting, sometimes worn wet by necessity. Sure they didn't look like a pristine pair of Lobbs but with a bit of dubbin or conditioner and polish they looked fine and lasted years.

Don't stress.
Shoes and clothes are meant to be worn not photographed.

New clothes and shoes never look right. Worn stuff looks better
All true. And I wouldn't worry Romp or necessarily think it's a fault with your meerkats. I remember getting caught in a real sea squall one night in a pair of handgrade C&Js. I was worried I might have ruined them but although they got soaked, they dried out eventually and were, literally, as good as new after drying on trees to keep their shape, and then a bit of a polish.

And I used to get mould on the bottom of my leather soled RMs when worn in the wet (which was/is often)... as fxh suggests some non-chlorine mould killer sprayed or wiped over the susceptible area will prevent it from growing back again next time the shoes get wet.
post #29411 of 57112

Jason and any other great minds - 

Do you think cashmere or wool ties would be acceptable for a CBD lawyer? 

I try to play it conservative/more of an english style (navy and mid grey suits, white or pale blue poplin shirts with a mid spread collar, black and dark brown shoes...)

post #29412 of 57112
Cashmere not so much, it's usually a bit fuzzy but smoother wools are fine. Stay tuned there are some nice ones coming next week including a shepherds check very similar to one you asked me about a while back.
post #29413 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Jason and any other great minds - 


Do you think cashmere or wool ties would be acceptable for a CBD lawyer? 


I try to play it conservative/more of an english style (navy and mid grey suits, white or pale blue poplin shirts with a mid spread collar, black and dark brown shoes...)

All depends on the fuzz factor. I have one of Jason's blue woolen herringbone ties and it is very smooth and matte - kind of perfect really! You could wear it with a gunny sack and it would still look great.

On the other hand, I have a couple of Ballantyne cashmere jobs with the fuzz factor dialled up to 11. I wear them because I like them - but I acknowledge that it is a bit "non-standard", so there are times when I wouldn't. I'm not a CBD lawyer, but I was once, and I would still wear them, but I would make sure every thing else is pretty much dialled back. Do you go to court? Probably a bit much for court.
post #29414 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnnamedPlayer View Post

ROmp is wrong, you are correct.

 

Hand welted, which Meermin's "linea Masetro" and by extension MTO shoes are constructed as, do not have a cork layer.

 

Romp's mistake was letting them air dry for 24Hours, if the inside is still damp, the inside is still damp, not much more to it.

They must have copped one hell of a soaking.

 

All that need to be done is to stuff the shoe full of paper towels to suck out the moisture and once dry tree them and wear them.

Thanks but since you said I was wrong I found Put This On did a paid review and it would seem the LM/MTO use cork albeit thinner layers.

 

http://putthison.com/post/27986276299/we-got-it-for-free-meermin-shoes-exaggerations

 

Are you suggesting I should have tree'd them as soon as I took them off and wet?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Shoes get wet, and dry and get worn and get wet ....

I wore RM Williams leather soles leather boots on a farm for years - day in day out, no resting, sometimes worn wet by necessity. Sure they didn't look like a pristine pair of Lobbs but with a bit of dubbin or conditioner and polish they looked fine and lasted years.

Don't stress.
Shoes and clothes are meant to be worn not photographed.

New clothes and shoes never look right. Worn stuff looks better

 

Thanks FXH .. i think? patch[1].gif

 

In my experience shoes dont get damp insoles after 15 mins of walking on wet pavement (as opposed to torrential rain/puddles) 

post #29415 of 57112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post

 

Are you suggesting I should have tree'd them as soon as I took them off and wet?

 

 

 

Eh, I always thought shoes should be tree'd after you let them 'rest' for a bit. To let them cool down, in a sense. By "a bit" I mean about half an hour.

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