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Australian Members - Page 1917

post #28741 of 52324

Calling on the great minds as to chukkas:
1) What do you think of the Clarks originals?
2) What colour/leather would you consider classic in the chukka range? If you could only have one...

post #28742 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Calling on the great minds as to chukkas:

1) What do you think of the Clarks originals?

2) What colour/leather would you consider classic in the chukka range? If you could only have one...

They do their purpose and more casual wear as they are quite cheap on appearance and quality (which is fine casually)

The sole can be slippery when worn and wet

Chukka colours sand, navy or brown suede or army green as a close contender.
post #28743 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

This. It's been a gripe of mine that some places when letting out trousers will not maintain this split waistband. I could go on about how it adds to comfort when sitting down, but honestly, I can't say I notice a large enough difference. As for the aesthetics of it, don't stress about that, no-one's looking at you enough to give a shit. And that's a good thing smile.gif

+1 it's annoying but the difference is mainly when seated. I've tried undoing the split to see if I could gain a marginal amount to of comfort/room in a tight pair of pants and suffice to say it made zero difference when standing
post #28744 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Calling on the great minds as to chukkas:

1) What do you think of the Clarks originals?

2) What colour/leather would you consider classic in the chukka range? If you could only have one...

I've got a pair of the Clarks, has them for 10 years or so and going strong but I wouldn't call them chukka's, they're really a desert boot more suitable for wearing with denim, chino's and cords. Chukka's IMO should be able to be worn with trousers as well, especially in winter.

If I had to have one (actually I do already) it would be brown suede, not calf leather. If it had to be calf, then a textured grain in a darkish brown.
post #28745 of 52324
G'day blokes, my son (a 2 time cancer survivor) was recently granted his wish from the make-a-wish foundation to travel to the land down under. My 20 year old daughter, my 18 year old son, my wife, and I are very excited to be traveling to Australia sometime in July or August. We are to list things we would like to do and someone from the Australia chapter will try and put together an itinerary. We will be staying as many as 9 nights. I figured we would use one day to adjust to the time change and jet lag. My kids are moderately active and I know a surf lesson, snorkeling at the GB reef, seeing the Joeys and Koalas are on the list. If anyone would like to make suggestions as must see/do places or activities, please PM me or post if it is an appropriate place. Also, info on not sounding like a dumb American or how not to offend locals would be greatly welcome. Thanks! biggrin.gif
post #28746 of 52324

Journeyman, stop shit stirring.

 

I am trying really hard to find any value in streetminimal's posts, but you keep distracting me.

post #28747 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Calling on the great minds as to chukkas:

1) What do you think of the Clarks originals?

2) What colour/leather would you consider classic in the chukka range? If you could only have one...

I have a pair--they're somewhat clunky and ugly, but still a classic (strictly casual only though). Mine are the beeswax leather, which is good, but I think if I bought another pair it would be suede.
post #28748 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesuquegolfer View Post

G'day blokes, my son (a 2 time cancer survivor) was recently granted his wish from the make-a-wish foundation to travel to the land down under. My 20 year old daughter, my 18 year old son, my wife, and I are very excited to be traveling to Australia sometime in July or August. We are to list things we would like to do and someone from the Australia chapter will try and put together an itinerary. We will be staying as many as 9 nights. I figured we would use one day to adjust to the time change and jet lag. My kids are moderately active and I know a surf lesson, snorkeling at the GB reef, seeing the Joeys and Koalas are on the list. If anyone would like to make suggestions as must see/do places or activities, please PM me or post if it is an appropriate place. Also, info on not sounding like a dumb American or how not to offend locals would be greatly welcome. Thanks! biggrin.gif

Sounds like a fantastic opportunity. You'll have a great time here. Great Barrier Reef, Daintree rainforest, Sydney harbour and if you have time, Melbourne (see if you can get a viewing of Gerry's shoes collection) and Uluru.

It's pretty hard to offend us, so don't worry about any of that (though don't start conversations with 'G'day blokes').
post #28749 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesuquegolfer View Post

G'day blokes, my son (a 2 time cancer survivor) was recently granted his wish from the make-a-wish foundation to travel to the land down under. My 20 year old daughter, my 18 year old son, my wife, and I are very excited to be traveling to Australia sometime in July or August. We are to list things we would like to do and someone from the Australia chapter will try and put together an itinerary. We will be staying as many as 9 nights. I figured we would use one day to adjust to the time change and jet lag. My kids are moderately active and I know a surf lesson, snorkeling at the GB reef, seeing the Joeys and Koalas are on the list. If anyone would like to make suggestions as must see/do places or activities, please PM me or post if it is an appropriate place. Also, info on not sounding like a dumb American or how not to offend locals would be greatly welcome. Thanks! biggrin.gif

It'll be cooler in july/august so make sure you do the surfing lessons while you are up at GBR as itll be warm there:)

 

given this is styleforum .. the key offence that US tourists pull here is wearing socks with sandles 

post #28750 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesuquegolfer View Post

G'day blokes, my son (a 2 time cancer survivor) was recently granted his wish from the make-a-wish foundation to travel to the land down under. My 20 year old daughter, my 18 year old son, my wife, and I are very excited to be traveling to Australia sometime in July or August. We are to list things we would like to do and someone from the Australia chapter will try and put together an itinerary. We will be staying as many as 9 nights. I figured we would use one day to adjust to the time change and jet lag. My kids are moderately active and I know a surf lesson, snorkeling at the GB reef, seeing the Joeys and Koalas are on the list. If anyone would like to make suggestions as must see/do places or activities, please PM me or post if it is an appropriate place. Also, info on not sounding like a dumb American or how not to offend locals would be greatly welcome. Thanks! biggrin.gif

In 9 days, I would do Syd/QLD (barrier reef) and then Uluru if you can. Or else just Sydney and QLD (Gold Coast for beaches and theme parks/Daintree rainforest/Barrier Reef/Cairns etc.).

Much as I love my city (Melbourne), I don't think it's a great tourist city (the best bit, the Great Ocean Road, is 1.5 hours away), especially not for children and not in that time frame.

In Sydney, you can get your Aus wildlife fix at Featherdale or Taronga zoo, both are great.
post #28751 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post

It'll be cooler in july/august so make sure you do the surfing lessons while you are up at GBR as itll be warm there:)

given this is styleforum .. the key offence that US tourists pull here is wearing socks with sandles 

Socks with sandals wouldn't exactly be SF approved so I will be able to abide by that one.
post #28752 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Sounds like a fantastic opportunity. You'll have a great time here. Great Barrier Reef, Daintree rainforest, Sydney harbour and if you have time, Melbourne (see if you can get a viewing of Gerry's shoes collection) and Uluru.

It's pretty hard to offend us, so don't worry about any of that (though don't start conversations with 'G'day blokes').

See, my guide book has already mislead me. I didn't want to sound like the Aussie I am not, but G'day was supposed to be a friendly way to say hello, and I read to say mate to the man you were addressing and bloke if addressing many. In Hawaii one must be careful trying to blend in when it is obvious you don't. I have a tendency to pick up an accent after a few days and that can be offensive, especially when it is obviously wrong. Thanks for the suggestions.
post #28753 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post

In 9 days, I would do Syd/QLD (barrier reef) and then Uluru if you can. Or else just Sydney and QLD (Gold Coast for beaches and theme parks/Daintree rainforest/Barrier Reef/Cairns etc.).

Much as I love my city (Melbourne), I don't think it's a great tourist city (the best bit, the Great Ocean Road, is 1.5 hours away), especially not for children and not in that time frame.

In Sydney, you can get your Aus wildlife fix at Featherdale or Taronga zoo, both are great.

Is Uluru that exciting? I worry my kids would say, "It just looks like a big rock to me." I have this fear of sharks and you guys have the most fierce. Any concerns snorkeling the GB Reef or surfing? I saw where a lot of beaches have netting installed.
post #28754 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesuquegolfer View Post

Is Uluru that exciting? I worry my kids would say, "It just looks like a big rock to me." I have this fear of sharks and you guys have the most fierce. Any concerns snorkeling the GB Reef or surfing? I saw where a lot of beaches have netting installed.

Uluru is, basically, just a big rock but it's really the overall experience that is interesting - being out in what is pretty much desert, or certainly semi-arid conditions, seeing the sunrise and/or sunset over the rock, going on a walk around the rock or around the local area and so on.

Whilst it is interesting, it's also a long, long way from anywhere else and so if you have limited time, you'd probably be better rewarded spending it in and around Sydney and then up north on the Great Barrier Reef, for example.

I'm not a Sydney native, and of course there are plenty of Sydney people in this thread, but with regard to being a tourist in Sydney, I'd recommend catching a few ferries around the harbour, going to the Australian Maritime Museum and Darling Harbour (perhaps the Powerhouse Museum, too), having a wander around the botanic gardens and having a look at the Opera House, and catching a ferry over to Taronga Zoo (which must surely have the best views of any zoo in the world - and make sure that you catch the cable car up to the top of the zoo when you arrive, so that you can then walk back down through the zoo to the ferry).

One thing to remember is that, like the US, Australia is a big country, so it takes time to get around.
post #28755 of 52324
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesuquegolfer View Post


See, my guide book has already mislead me. I didn't want to sound like the Aussie I am not, but G'day was supposed to be a friendly way to say hello, and I read to say mate to the man you were addressing and bloke if addressing many. In Hawaii one must be careful trying to blend in when it is obvious you don't. I have a tendency to pick up an accent after a few days and that can be offensive, especially when it is obviously wrong. Thanks for the suggestions.

You can probably get away with calling people "mate".  You can really only get away with "g'day mate" if you've got a broad ocker accent like Paul Hogan, though, it has become a caricature of Australia more than something people actually say.  "Bloke" is more of something you say about other people... "those blokes over there".  I wouldn't ever say "hey blokes!".

 

Oh, if you have one of those bags you put around your waist, do not call it a fanny pack.  "Fanny" over here refers to, well, naughty bits.  That's probably the #1 word-related embarrassment for Americans here.

 

If your family is in to sports, July-August is a great time to catch a live game of Australian Rules Football, it's a pretty unique sport and fun to watch even if you don't know what's going on due to the fast pace and athleticism of it (or so I have been told by all the overseas visitors I've dragged along to games).

 

But with a limited time available, I'd say the first priority should be to spend a few days up at Port Douglas or Cairns and use that as a base to visit the Great Barrier Reef and the Daintree Rainforest and see some native animals.  Fly in to Sydney, see the harbour and the Opera House and whatever else, then up to Port Douglas.  After that you could go out to Alice Springs for Uluru/Ayers Rock and maybe other desert attractions, down to Melbourne, or down to Tasmania- Tasmania's a beautiful and compact place, you can see wildlife sanctuaries, glorious national parks (mountains, forests, rivers, caves, beaches-  whatever takes your fancy) and historical remains of the convict era all within 1 day if you wanted to.  Because everything is so close together and there's so much unique stuff there, like the Port Arthur convict settlement and Tasmanian Devil sanctuaries, the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) and all the national parks, it'd be great no matter what your family is interested in.

 

The only trouble with Tasmania in July-August is it will be cold.  Not snowing, but still really cold (everything in Australia south of Port Douglas will be cold at that time of year, but Tasmania especially).

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