or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Australian Members - Page 1689

post #25321 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post


Don't match your suit, tie or shirt

That would be a lot of different colours.

 

White shirt, burgundy tie, navy suit and a fourth colour? A white pocket square would be fine. That matches the shirt.

post #25322 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiejake View Post

Couple of questions regarding accessories:

Kent Wang for my first cuff links? Something simple like the knot silver or silver barbell?

What first 5-6 colours of pocket squares should I get for a navy and charcoal suit? Buying from Kent Wang, Sam Hober or Vanda most likely.

Any guide to colouring of pocket squares?
I don't want to burst your bubble, but I would humbly suggest foregoing the PS at this stage. If you don't yet own a pair of cufflinks I assume you are new to dressing well, as we all were once (fxh was found swaddled in a thrift store trenchcoat and blahman was born in hello kitty gear straight out of the womb but they're two stories for another time).

A PS is what you might call an "advanced" accessory, especially in Australia. If you get it wrong (which, with all respect, you will if you have to ask what colours to get and you buy 6 at a time) you will look like a complete twat (and half the population will think you are anyway, even if you get it right).

Don't try to run before you can walk.

And re cufflinks, maybe have a look at David Atkins' cufflinks. Classic style, will last you forever, and they are that (sadly) rarest of things- a superior product made in Australia.
post #25323 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

A white pocket square would be fine. That matches the shirt.
Careful, talk like that will attract mafoofan back to our humble (mostly) thread...
post #25324 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

That would be a lot of different colours.

White shirt, burgundy tie, navy suit and a fourth colour? A white pocket square would be fine. That matches the shirt.

I thought was obvious that a white linen square is the the exception rolleyes.gif. In your example, both a burgundy square or a plain navy square wouldn't look very good.
post #25325 of 52334
LOL....
post #25326 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

I don't want to burst your bubble, but I would humbly suggest foregoing the PS at this stage. If you don't yet own a pair of cufflinks I assume you are new to dressing well, as we all were once (fxh was found swaddled in a thrift store trenchcoat and blahman was born in hello kitty gear straight out of the womb but they're two stories for another time).

A PS is what you might call an "advanced" accessory, especially in Australia. If you get it wrong (which, with all respect, you will if you have to ask what colours to get and you buy 6 at a time) you will look like a complete twat (and half the population will think you are anyway, even if you get it right).

Don't try to run before you can walk.

And re cufflinks, maybe have a look at David Atkins' cufflinks. Classic style, will last you forever, and they are that (sadly) rarest of things- a superior product made in Australia.
Agree with this 100%. It's a complete fallacy that a ps is required to be well dressed. Work on the basics first, if you need one then absolutely it should be white linen.

And yeah do check out Dave's cuff links. He is a new Aussie affiliate and has some really exquisite links.
www.davidatkins.com.au
post #25327 of 52334
Bought new shoes today. Will post pics soon smile.gif

Spent the past 15 minutes tying knots with some new ties I recently got off Jason. They're lovely. The ties, the knots are OK.

Also, GeoffreyFirmin - sorry mate, I neglected to catch up with you while I was in CBR.

Has anyone here watched Django Unchained?
post #25328 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post


I don't want to burst your bubble, but I would humbly suggest foregoing the PS at this stage. If you don't yet own a pair of cufflinks I assume you are new to dressing well, as we all were once (fxh was found swaddled in a thrift store trenchcoat and blahman was born in hello kitty gear straight out of the womb but they're two stories for another time).

A PS is what you might call an "advanced" accessory, especially in Australia. If you get it wrong (which, with all respect, you will if you have to ask what colours to get and you buy 6 at a time) you will look like a complete twat (and half the population will think you are anyway, even if you get it right).

Don't try to run before you can walk.

And re cufflinks, maybe have a look at David Atkins' cufflinks. Classic style, will last you forever, and they are that (sadly) rarest of things- a superior product made in Australia.

lol !

 

this

 

actually ive suggested to people new to PS that to start with a plain white PS folded OR go with something dark with some subtle colour highlights to ease your way in.

 

I still dont wear a PS in most business situations here as most of my clients dont even wear a tie or jacket and id come across too "bling" or showy with a ps as well

post #25329 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post


I thought was obvious that a white linen square is the the exception rolleyes.gif.

:)

 

Just making sure your absolute wasn't an absolute.

 

Wearing a PS like a tool, I love doing it. Just for the attention. Rob is right though, women love it.

post #25330 of 52334
White linen is the canonical "correct with everything" square, despite Foo's objections, go with that first especially for worsted suits in conservative colours. Larger prints are better for silk squares, as regular geometric patterns look too similar to ties. Silk also contrasts nicely with tweed and non-silk ties. An item which calls for contrast.
post #25331 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

Wearing a PS like a tool

 

Don't put yourself down like that, I'm sure you look fine wink.gif

post #25332 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Has anyone here watched Django Unchained?

 

What shoes?

 

Also, Django Unchained was a lot of fun. I couldn't believe the three hours went by so quickly.

post #25333 of 52334
Wait for pics, my friend. Never fear, they're 'classic menswear', I don't want to ruffle feathers with streetwear.

I love the soundtrack. The John Legend track that plays during ... I don't want to spoil it, but I like that track. I think I may see it again.

If anyone's in Canberra, I saw it at the new Palace Cinemas. Lovely complex.
post #25334 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie's Wardrobe View Post

Not really, unless the major tafe's can find some tailors willing to teach tailoring, instead of designer's or dressmakers teaching fashion design. I suspect the problem lies here, not so much with younger people willing to learn. That, and there is an extremely low call for bespoke tailoring in Australia. Even the current prominent shop in Australia, P.Johnson Tailors, are not tailors themselves, it's all outsourced. And I don't say that to put them down, I say it to say you don't need to be a tailor to have a successful business/career in menswear. But there's all the marketing, business acumen, press etc you do need and unfortunately most true tailors don't have the latter.

Adding to the above. Theres many tiered issues here. Old school tailoring took on apprentices at 15 or younger, and, depending on your viewpoint, basically exploited them, or fed and clothed them and kept them off the streets, and taught them many basic skills along the way. Starting with sweeping the floor only. Its a common pattern, hairdressing was like that too and other "trades". In addition many tailors jealously and irrationally guarded (and still do) the ways they did things. Some of the ways they did things were simply traditional and not even the best way by a longshot.

The world changed in the 50s 60s and teenagers were invented. Neither children nor adults.

Most traditional apprenticeships/craft guilds etc didn't adapt. The post-industrial era didn't value such things as hand single shop tailoring when "pretty bloody good enough" factory made clothing (even tailored stuff) was cheap, good quality and ubiquitous. Australia's Wool Industry and Government have a lot to answer for but thats for another story/book. On that I highly recommend anyone truly interested in all this and context to read Breaking the Sheep’s Back, by Charles Massey

No one these days is going to go to full time work at 15 for peanuts, work 10 years then maybe, just maybe make a living as a tailor. Schools of Fashion and Textile Technology have to follow the money and thats NOT in Mens bespoke Tailoring in Melbourne. Just off the top of my head I can think of less than 10 tailors in Melbourne, most near or past retirement age, who could make you a half decent suit - and here I'm not even talking forum approved. Of those 3 or 4 I know a bit more about I can think of not one has an apprentice. I doubt the others do either.

People became tailors because they were good artisans, or became good artisans, with a bit of luck and experience they also could understand how to compensate for the normal bodies of most people and create a silhouette etc. If they were a bit more talented in certain areas, and some of this is personality and art, they could keep up with changing fashions.

The times have been against tailoring. Not attractive to young trainees, minimum wages in Australia making it uneconomical for a small tailor shop to employ an apprentice/trainee, prejudice against tailor made clothes, cheap ready made suits and a general increasing casualisation of everyday, business and formal wear. A casualisation accelerated beyond the existing trends to say wear lounge suits instead of morning suits, sportcoats instead of suits, no tie instead of ties, athletic shoes instead of leather shoes etc.

In addition tailors, in general, with some exceptions, have contributed to the problem. They haven't been helped by the above economic and social factors. Whereas you can find manuals/books on say, engineering, how to build a plane yourself,machine the parts and to fly it, how to program piece of software - its difficult to get hold of a useful modern how to manual on tailoring. Its unfair to criticise a previous generation of tailors for not being manual writers or makers of videos to teach. Although that does seem to be changing. Whilst experience and experience and experience will always only be able to be obtained by doing work over a period, some parts of tailoring could and can be learnt by a determined and committed late starter possibly even in less than 10 years. Much good work can also be done by machinery. A mix of artisan hand skills and smart use of machinery (CAD type patterns, some cutting and sewing etc) combined well is likely to be the future.

The "new" tailors or artisanal skills will come mainly from asia or low wage countries where it still makes a sense to have such a career. There will also be a few, possibly enough at times, people who will take it up as an advanced hobby or late vocation. Perhaps.
post #25335 of 52334
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Has anyone here watched Django Unchained?

Hnnnnnggggg!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Australian Members