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post #25246 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spandexter View Post

We always have the same 60 year old delivery guy. He likes to talk to my wife. We never have any missed deliveries. Even if there is nobody home in the morning he swings by again in the afternoon. Huh.
Same with us, well ours is a young guy but always the same nice guy. Never misses out on us and always early in the morning. Benefits of living in a semi-country town.
post #25247 of 57821
I live in the inner city and our delivery guy is great as well. Often see him zipping around the neighbourhood. Hope he stays around.
post #25248 of 57821
Been a victim of driveby couriers as well.

I find they're not so daring when you give a work address; guess it's harder to explain things away when there's a reception desk.

For alterations, try Alterations by Master near Henry Bucks (in Sydney). That would be Michael Pasquale's shop. A bit more expensive, but he does excellent work.
post #25249 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

If you live in the Inner West/West, and don't want to travel to the city for alterations try Amy's Alteration in Balmain:
http://www.yellowpages.com.au/nsw/balmain/amy-alteration-and-tailoring-14173777-listing.html

Raiza is a good tailor who is quite honest and open. He is an Afghan refugee who has been here for about 9 years. Prices are very reasonable. The experience will be pretty similar to that of DR above.

Agreed. He is a very decent chap and has done a bunch of work for my fam - all turned out well.
post #25250 of 57821

Thanks for the recommendations guys. I live in the North Shore area and I am definitely not trying do all the long travel to save a few bulks. I have had some of my shirts FxxK up by the alteration place in the big shopping mall, and my recent experience from Looksmart (MJ Bale use them) told me to stay away from those places. so I am looking for decent tailor who can do a good job with reasonable price.

 

What do people think of Rochefort at 185 Elizabeth St?

post #25251 of 57821

And what do people think about MJ Bale suits? for me  their material feels good. According to their website they are half canvass suit. Are they made in China? 

post #25252 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Socks View Post


Might add this to my signature.

 

Occupational hazard haha!

post #25253 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spandexter View Post

We always have the same 60 year old delivery guy.He likes to talk to my wife.. We never have any missed deliveries. Even if there is nobody home in the morning he swings by again in the afternoon. Huh.
I would be alarmed.
post #25254 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post

I'd rather just get a cheapy from Zara or Topman or something on sale. Hardly worth dropping a lot of dough on a first suit that you're just going to wear twice a year. Go cheap to begin with then go baller later.

This is bad advice.
post #25255 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post

This is bad advice.

+1

Manuhiri pointed this out to me from Put This On yesterday. Thought it was interesting.

If I Could Speak to My Younger Self

In my time as a man interested in men’s clothing and style, I’ve made many mistakes, some of them very expensive. If I could speak to my younger self, I would give the following advice. Note, I don’t pretend these are universal truisms, but from my experience building a wardrobe, and seeing others go along the same path, I think these are more often true than not. So, if you’re just starting out, perhaps you will find these useful.

1. Always prioritize quality over quantity. It’s better to have one perfect navy sport coat than five sport jackets that aren’t quite right. Better to have five pairs of truly nice shoes than ten that are mediocre. In the end, many of us will acquire wardrobes that are much bigger than what we need, and only wear 10% of what we have. It’s better to trade quantity for quality.

2. Beware of accessories. Nice things such as sport coats and shoes are expensive, and it’s easy to stave off these purchases by picking up small accessories here and there. If you do, you’ll soon find that you have a hundred ties, but only three sport coats to wear them with. Beware of acquiring too many accessories. It’s better to save your money for things that will make a bigger impact.

3. Beware of sales. Clearance sales can often be false bargains. Psychology Today had a good post about why this is. If given the stark choice, it’s better to purchase things you truly love at full price, than to go for a sale that will only leave you wanting. (That said, shop smartly, as most things go on sale, but don’t buy something just because of the price).

4. Build a shopping list. Figure out your annual budget for clothes, make a list of what you truly need, and then decide how much you want to spend on each item. This will help you avoid the pitfalls #2 and #3 above, and make sure you’re building a wardrobe, not just a collection of clothes. It also helps discipline you to something I think is truly important: giving a purchase a few months worth of thought before actually pulling out the credit card.

5. Prioritize fit above everything else. By fit I don’t just mean whether something fits you well (shoulder seams end at the shoulders; collars stay on the neck; chest isn’t too big or tight; etc), but also whether the silhouette flatters you. Learn the difference between fit and silhouettes, and pay attention to both. Don’t buy something just because it’s on sale, has some trendy stylistic detail, or is made with the finest hand stitching in the world. If it doesn’t fit and flatter, all that means nothing.

6. Pay attention, then ignore, what other men are wearing. One of the best ways to learn how to dress is by paying attention to well-dressed men. At the same time, know that just because something looks great on someone else doesn’t mean it will look great on you. You may not have the same body type or live the same lifestyle. Take inspiration from good places, but also be honest about how something looks on you.

7. Take time to find your sense of style. Feel free to experiment, but do it slowly. A little dabbling here and there is fine, but if you jump in with both feet too quickly, you may find yourself purging what you have in a year or two. Finding your own sense of style will take years of maturity (literally) and a lot of honesty. Give yourself time.

8. Don’t spend too much money in the beginning. “Buy less, buy better” is a good mantra to live by unless you’re just starting out. If you are, buying mid-quality things on sale can be a smart way to experiment here and there, as well as make sure your mistakes won’t be too costly. And yes, mistakes will be made.

9. Dress coherently and simply. There are some men who dress with great success by having thing clash and layering dozens of items on themselves. However, I’ve found less is more, and harmony is better than chaos. Have a message and stick to something simple.

10. Be patient. If you can’t afford something today, learn how to scrimp, save, and shop slowly. You don’t need that big of a wardrobe anyway, and you certainly don’t need to acquire everything now. Patient, thoughtful wardrobe building will always win out over a hurried, excited shopping. Once you’ve gotten a good handle on your sense of style, imagine the wardrobe you want in five or seven years, and slowly work towards that.
post #25256 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by flexiflex View Post

And what do people think about MJ Bale suits? for me  their material feels good. According to their website they are half canvass suit. Are they made in China? 

Most here have positive views regarding MJ Bale. The company puts a lot of effort into sourcing wool, which is all from Australia.

 

The classic line of suiting is all half canvassed (or completely de-constructed in some cases) and made in China. Do not let this deter you, some places in China like the supplier MJ Bale uses are getting very good at creating quality suits for reasonable prices. MJ Bale also has a "collection" line of suits, which are made in Japan and are of much higher quality and price.

post #25257 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post


+1

Manuhiri pointed this out to me from Put This On yesterday. Thought it was interesting.

If I Could Speak to My Younger Self

In my time as a man interested in men’s clothing and style, I’ve made many mistakes, some of them very expensive. If I could speak to my younger self, I would give the following advice. Note, I don’t pretend these are universal truisms, but from my experience building a wardrobe, and seeing others go along the same path, I think these are more often true than not. So, if you’re just starting out, perhaps you will find these useful.

1. Always prioritize quality over quantity. It’s better to have one perfect navy sport coat than five sport jackets that aren’t quite right. Better to have five pairs of truly nice shoes than ten that are mediocre. In the end, many of us will acquire wardrobes that are much bigger than what we need, and only wear 10% of what we have. It’s better to trade quantity for quality.

2. Beware of accessories. Nice things such as sport coats and shoes are expensive, and it’s easy to stave off these purchases by picking up small accessories here and there. If you do, you’ll soon find that you have a hundred ties, but only three sport coats to wear them with. Beware of acquiring too many accessories. It’s better to save your money for things that will make a bigger impact.

3. Beware of sales. Clearance sales can often be false bargains. Psychology Today had a good post about why this is. If given the stark choice, it’s better to purchase things you truly love at full price, than to go for a sale that will only leave you wanting. (That said, shop smartly, as most things go on sale, but don’t buy something just because of the price).

4. Build a shopping list. Figure out your annual budget for clothes, make a list of what you truly need, and then decide how much you want to spend on each item. This will help you avoid the pitfalls #2 and #3 above, and make sure you’re building a wardrobe, not just a collection of clothes. It also helps discipline you to something I think is truly important: giving a purchase a few months worth of thought before actually pulling out the credit card.

5. Prioritize fit above everything else. By fit I don’t just mean whether something fits you well (shoulder seams end at the shoulders; collars stay on the neck; chest isn’t too big or tight; etc), but also whether the silhouette flatters you. Learn the difference between fit and silhouettes, and pay attention to both. Don’t buy something just because it’s on sale, has some trendy stylistic detail, or is made with the finest hand stitching in the world. If it doesn’t fit and flatter, all that means nothing.

6. Pay attention, then ignore, what other men are wearing. One of the best ways to learn how to dress is by paying attention to well-dressed men. At the same time, know that just because something looks great on someone else doesn’t mean it will look great on you. You may not have the same body type or live the same lifestyle. Take inspiration from good places, but also be honest about how something looks on you.

7. Take time to find your sense of style. Feel free to experiment, but do it slowly. A little dabbling here and there is fine, but if you jump in with both feet too quickly, you may find yourself purging what you have in a year or two. Finding your own sense of style will take years of maturity (literally) and a lot of honesty. Give yourself time.

8. Don’t spend too much money in the beginning. “Buy less, buy better” is a good mantra to live by unless you’re just starting out. If you are, buying mid-quality things on sale can be a smart way to experiment here and there, as well as make sure your mistakes won’t be too costly. And yes, mistakes will be made.

9. Dress coherently and simply. There are some men who dress with great success by having thing clash and layering dozens of items on themselves. However, I’ve found less is more, and harmony is better than chaos. Have a message and stick to something simple.

10. Be patient. If you can’t afford something today, learn how to scrimp, save, and shop slowly. You don’t need that big of a wardrobe anyway, and you certainly don’t need to acquire everything now. Patient, thoughtful wardrobe building will always win out over a hurried, excited shopping. Once you’ve gotten a good handle on your sense of style, imagine the wardrobe you want in five or seven years, and slowly work towards that.

Thanks for taking the time for the above advice. Great tips there.

 

Something I might add is that your preference will change. what you like today will be quite different later on. So if you are starting to build your wardrobe, try to get something that is classic in style and in good quality, which is unlikely to go out of style and they will last. For example if you are getting a nice pair of shoes, instead of getting a pair of fashion foward black pointy shoes from Calibre during sales, why not invest more and get a pair of decent C&J oxford, or even Loake from DJ? they are going be more versatile and can last a century if they are properly cared.

 

I have made mistakes mentioned above and bought three shirts that don't fit me very well (guess what, 3 for $150 at MJ Bale). I did picked up a very nice pair of cuff links from Herringbone (sterring silver) for 50% off.

post #25258 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by flexiflex View Post

And what do people think about MJ Bale suits? for me  their material feels good. According to their website they are half canvass suit. Are they made in China? 

As Dartagnan Red just pointed out, MJ Bale's suits are quite nice. Some of them are a bit "fashion forward" with narrow lapels but there are some classic suits in their line-up, too.

They have a couple of different "blocks", too, including one that is quite slim-fitting (just slightly too slim for me, alas).

If you are shopping for suits, don't forget to look at Herringbone, too.
post #25259 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selvaggio View Post


Agreed. He is a very decent chap and has done a bunch of work for my fam - all turned out well.

What!? You know him?

 

Are you Balmain born and bred Selvaggio?

post #25260 of 57821
Quote:
Originally Posted by DartagnanRed View Post

Most here have positive views regarding MJ Bale. The company puts a lot of effort into sourcing wool, which is all from Australia.

The classic line of suiting is all half canvassed (or completely de-constructed in some cases) and made in China. Do not let this deter you, some places in China like the supplier MJ Bale uses are getting very good at creating quality suits for reasonable prices. MJ Bale also has a "collection" line of suits, which are made in Japan and are of much higher quality and price.
+1 .. I dont think you can truly gauge an items quality by where it is made. There has been sooo much investment in china that good quality stuff can be found quite easily nowdays,

Equally there is alot of "made in italy" stuff that is shocking quality.

Mjbale suits seem quite decent at the price point, perhaps too slim and the lapels too narrow but really thats an aesthetic thing. The materials used seem decent .. Not sure what the 2 for 1000 line use for cloth but ive seen loro piana swatch books in the cbd store (is there mtm?)
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