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Australian Members - Page 1676

post #25126 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


What anyone thinks looks good is not merely a reflection of primal impulse. It's fundamentally a matter of what you know and understand. Naturally, when we understand something differently, we also view it differently. What might have been beautiful becomes hideous, and vice versa. So, if you took time to learn the established canon of classic menswear, I think you'd understand what you see at Pitti differently--and it would be a more rewarding experience, as you could mine real lessons and inspiration. Things to build on and learn from, not merely outfits to mimmic.
 

 

This, I am sure we all agree with. Some good points.

 

I can see some possible animosity towards some members who claim to wear a particular style of clothing, and are doing so without having considered thoughts from those past and present.

 

Quote:

A good book on classic style won't tell you what to wear every day. That's not the point. I do not dress the way Flusser and Boyer tell me to. Rather, I read them and realized there are principles and ideas and concepts to apply. The point is to learn the language of classic menswear so that when you use elements of it, you can do so to better effect.

This is a completely different tack from what you wrote a few pages back. 'Principles, ideas and concepts' of clothing I can accept, 'rules', I cannot. These books no doubt heighten ones understanding of the breadth of clothing out there. They help explain why and how people wear a certain type of clothing, and more importantly, how this vein of clothing developed over time, but they certainly aren't intended to dictate what one should wear, or how they are to wear it.

 

If I am not mistaken, I think you would agree.

 

With all that said, I don't see how Nicholas deserves what was said to him.

post #25127 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by TehBunny View Post

If your going for 60-70 sneakers why just not pick up a pair of Supergas' their $70 with free shipping; they seem to be the hip sneaker which goes between #menswear....according to tumblr :P

Edit: their website is down for maintenance

 

Thanks Bunny, will keep an eye on this.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post


Yeah we have updated our collars with a softer german interlining now .. Good observation
yup small is equiv to the 14.5

 

Well, here's hoping that SM's neck grows about 1.43cm thicker tonight. This will mean his button trick won't work and i'll get to try one of your white shirts :).

post #25128 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

 

Well, here's hoping that SM's neck grows about 1.43cm thicker tonight. This will mean his button trick won't work and i'll get to try one of your white shirts :).

 

Well you never know, he may enter a Pie Eating comp tonight...

post #25129 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

 

Thanks Bunny, will keep an eye on this.

 

 

Just keep in mind the $70 Supergas tend to be canvas, whereas $95 for example (plus about 10 bucks shipping) would net you the leather Kent Wangs. Don't know if you saw the pic from reddit's MFA of various white sneakers that I posted a few pages back (after that kerfuffle about #menswear10commandments) but I found it really helpful in checking out some alternatives to CPs. While the superga AU website is down, you can check out some of the range at http://www.theiconic.com.au/superga/ if you're curious :). Leather supergas can be found here whilst the AU site is down: http://www.superga.co.uk/browse/Leathers_413_0_0_na_mens_12.html - wonder what the local pricing on those would be... they look pretty damn nice if I do say so myself!

post #25130 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty Brogues View Post

Well you never know, he may enter a Pie Eating comp tonight...

DB! You're alive!? I thought you might have drowned in all that foam today!

 

 

Quote:

Just keep in mind the $70 Supergas tend to be canvas, whereas $95 for example (plus about 10 bucks shipping) would net you the leather Kent Wangs. Don't know if you saw the pic from reddit's MFA of various white sneakers that I posted a few pages back (after that kerfuffle about #menswear10commandments) but I found it really helpful in checking out some alternatives to CPs. While the superga AU website is down, you can check out some of the range at http://www.theiconic.com.au/superga/ if you're curious :).

I was looking at those KW sneakers, but I don't want white. Which stumped me. Thanks for the link though :). Are you leaning towards white?

 

The Superga have a giant 'rim'. Like an over emphasised plimsoll.

 

I was thinking something more like this: http://www.asos.com/au/Fred-Perry/Fred-Perry-Kingston-Suede-Plimsolls/Prod/pgeproduct.aspx?iid=2317936&cid=1935&Rf-400=2943&sh=0&pge=0&pgesize=20&sort=-1&clr=Red

post #25131 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post

+1 .Love these massive debates and people throwing in paragraphs of text to sound educated and more knowledgable about how to dress. Its just clothes and its style forum.... There is no rule to what "style" an individual may choose. Listen, observe, learn but ultimately dress how you like.

Nah, you're wrong.

You are justifying, or attempting to justify, a pretty half arsed approach to menswear, or heck, any passion/hobby/interest/whatever.

There are idiot kids in bars mixing good whiskies with coke. They're having fun, doesn't make it right. There are entire watch forums devoted to people who think their bling watches are hot shit. I'm sure they're they are having fun wearing them. But it doesn't make them right.

We've seen pretty good evidence that some of the rules are for fools crowd are pretty much basing that outlook on... well nothing substantial, unless you consider an uninformed opinion an opinion worth considering.

To use an analogy, Picasso mastered realism before moving on to the styles he is best known for today. Like I mentioned earlier somewhat glibly, you master the rules before you break them. They provide a framework for you to break rules in a deliberate reasoned manner which is what I assume all of us want. This is not the same as saying we must all follow the rules and thus must look the same.

The alternative is ignorance, but then don't try to defend your position with 'there are no rules' or 'rules don't matter because we're just meant to have fun' because there are, and that's just a half assed way to approach things you profess to enjoy.
post #25132 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

DB! You're alive!? I thought you might have drowned in all that foam today!

 

 

I was looking at those KW sneakers, but I don't want white. Which stumped me. Thanks for the link though :). Are you leaning towards white?

 

The Superga have a giant 'rim'. Like an over emphasised plimsoll.

 

I was thinking something more like this: http://www.asos.com/au/Fred-Perry/Fred-Perry-Kingston-Suede-Plimsolls/Prod/pgeproduct.aspx?iid=2317936&cid=1935&Rf-400=2943&sh=0&pge=0&pgesize=20&sort=-1&clr=Red

 

The colour on those Perrys is really nice - I'd just be a tad worried about the large logo getting in the way of the clean, minimal lines of it though, as a whole. I think they'd work really well as a relaxed, casual sneaker to wear with jeans, chinos or cord. pants even. As an aside, after seeing Prof's Landsend purchases, I must admit I was motivated to grab a couple cords for myself, as I saw them working well with suede shoes (when the pants were earthy colours like heather green or bordeaux red). It took remarkable restraint today to not purchase some C&J suede loafers at Herringbone... 

 

However, I am leaning toward the white Kent Wangs (impractical as the colour can be for a shoe; I imagine, after running out of leather conditioner in 2 weeks, I probably will be regretting the whole escapade). Right now I'm actually prioritising boots (such as the LL Bean Katahdins) over sneakers, as I have a feeling the boots'll come in far more handy in the coming fall and winter seasons than the white sneakers would. So a bit of a shoe quandary, as it were.

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post


Nah, you're wrong.

You are justifying, or attempting to justify, a pretty half arsed approach to menswear, or heck, any passion/hobby/interest/whatever.

There are idiot kids in bars mixing good whiskies with coke. They're having fun, doesn't make it right. There are entire watch forums devoted to people who think their bling watches are hot shit. I'm sure they're they are having fun wearing them. But it doesn't make them right.

We've seen pretty good evidence that some of the rules are for fools crowd are pretty much basing that outlook on... well nothing substantial, unless you consider an uninformed opinion an opinion worth considering.

To use an analogy, Picasso mastered realism before moving on to the styles he is best known for today. Like I mentioned earlier somewhat glibly, you master the rules before you break them. They provide a framework for you to break rules in a deliberate reasoned manner which is what I assume all of us want. This is not the same as saying we must all follow the rules and thus must look the same.

The alternative is ignorance, but then don't try to defend your position with 'there are no rules' or 'rules don't matter because we're just meant to have fun' because there are, and that's just a half assed way to approach things you profess to enjoy.
 

Although I understand somewhat the argument you're putting forward, I think at some stage you've got to step back and realise that cultural artifacts such as art/clothing are more factoid than fact, as it were. You might consider someone's style 'wrong' in the context of your experience, but that doesn't make them objectively 'wrong', if that makes sense. At least, it doesn't make them wrong in the way that answering 2+2=5 would be wrong.

 

That aside, I think what's most grating about your recent few posts is the misreading of others attitudes and subsequent glib (as you said) and ad hominem attacks. As others have noted, if your first response to perceived 'wrongdoing' is to rabidly insult the supposed transgressor, they are probably going to discard your opinion, however informed or well-intentioned it may be.

 

Despite being the target of your invective previously, I understand that you probably wrote what you did in the heat of the moment, reacting to perceived slights against what you valued in something that you are passionate about. I can understand that - as can many of us, as we are all here because we are interested and passionate about menswear and style. If you're based in Sydney, I'd be more than willing to have a dram with you and chat about your understanding of the latter topics - of course, we can go somewhere other than Baxters Inn if you'd prefer. wink.gif


Edited by Nicholas D C - 1/28/13 at 4:27am
post #25133 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post


Nah, you're wrong.

You are justifying, or attempting to justify, a pretty half arsed approach to menswear, or heck, any passion/hobby/interest/whatever.

There are idiot kids in bars mixing good whiskies with coke. They're having fun, doesn't make it right. There are entire watch forums devoted to people who think their bling watches are hot shit. I'm sure they're they are having fun wearing them. But it doesn't make them right.

We've seen pretty good evidence that some of the rules are for fools crowd are pretty much basing that outlook on... well nothing substantial, unless you consider an uninformed opinion an opinion worth considering.

To use an analogy, Picasso mastered realism before moving on to the styles he is best known for today. Like I mentioned earlier somewhat glibly, you master the rules before you break them. They provide a framework for you to break rules in a deliberate reasoned manner which is what I assume all of us want. This is not the same as saying we must all follow the rules and thus must look the same.

The alternative is ignorance, but then don't try to defend your position with 'there are no rules' or 'rules don't matter because we're just meant to have fun' because there are, and that's just a half assed way to approach things you profess to enjoy.

 

To quote Charlie Parker - "Master your instrument, master the music and then forget all that and just play." Same principle applies here.

post #25134 of 58049
Well the update on my shirt is that I moved it 1cm out but there's still a bit of tightness in it. It was less than <0.5 inch.

dawson-crying.jpg

So uhhh...looks like it'll have to go.
post #25135 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetminimal View Post

Well the update on my shirt is that I moved it 1cm out but there's still a bit of tightness in it. It was less than <0.5 inch.

dawson-crying.jpg

So uhhh...looks like it'll have to go.

 

M Sy you can go in for the crumbs now you hyena.

post #25136 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post


Nah, you're wrong.

You are justifying, or attempting to justify, a pretty half arsed approach to menswear, or heck, any passion/hobby/interest/whatever.

There are idiot kids in bars mixing good whiskies with coke. They're having fun, doesn't make it right. There are entire watch forums devoted to people who think their bling watches are hot shit. I'm sure they're they are having fun wearing them. But it doesn't make them right.

We've seen pretty good evidence that some of the rules are for fools crowd are pretty much basing that outlook on... well nothing substantial, unless you consider an uninformed opinion an opinion worth considering.

To use an analogy, Picasso mastered realism before moving on to the styles he is best known for today. Like I mentioned earlier somewhat glibly, you master the rules before you break them. They provide a framework for you to break rules in a deliberate reasoned manner which is what I assume all of us want. This is not the same as saying we must all follow the rules and thus must look the same.

The alternative is ignorance, but then don't try to defend your position with 'there are no rules' or 'rules don't matter because we're just meant to have fun' because there are, and that's just a half assed way to approach things you profess to enjoy.

I have extremely strong preferences in various areas: coffee, clothing, music, food and tv just to name a few. I'll defend them to a point, but if you really drill me I'm humble enough to admit that I'm really just a little organism on a relatively small rock in space looking for shit to get me through the day. Is this "half-assed" or just reality? It's fun having views and it's more fun when they're based on research or personal knowledge or whatever, but don't be so serious about it as to believe there are actually objective truths in the human created notions of clothing, music, art and entertainment.

 

"The alternative is ignorance." Really? You can't imagine any mid point between believing there are objective rules, knowing all the rules and following them, or not believing in rules, not knowing the them and disregarding them?

post #25137 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Sy View Post

SM didn't find the joke all that humorous.

3a0.jpg

post #25138 of 58049
Quote:
Originally Posted by DartagnanRed View Post

I have extremely strong preferences in various areas: coffee, clothing, music, food and tv just to name a few. I'll defend them to a point, but if you really drill me I'm humble enough to admit that I'm really just a little organism on a relatively small rock in space looking for shit to get me through the day. Is this "half-assed" or just reality? It's fun having views and it's more fun when they're based on research or personal knowledge or whatever, but don't be so serious about it as to believe there are actually objective truths in the human created notions of clothing, music, art and entertainment.

"The alternative is ignorance."
Really? You can't imagine any mid point between believing there are objective rules, knowing all the rules and following them, or not believing in rules, not knowing the them and disregarding them?

(See bolder section above.)

This is where we start to veer into the realm of philosophy, perhaps.

Certainly, whilst there is no one, true way that is globally applicable in terms of music, art and so on, it's clear that there are norms (or rules, at the risk of starting a fight!) in regard to such things.

Sure, there are people who push the boundaries - John Cage in music, Damien Hirst in art, to name just a couple - but whilst you'll find some people who will laud them (some because they think that they are genuinely talented, others because they appreciate the iconoclasm) most will think that they are a bit silly.

Sure, some iconoclastic artists/composers/fashion designers and so on were truly talented and groundbreaking but, as apropos pointed out when he referred to Picasso, most of them were well-versed in their field and so knew that they were deliberately traducing traditions in doing what they were doing. If you go to art school, you have to learn about fashion and colour. If you learn an instrument, you have to learn the notes, how to read music, understand rhythm and so on. There are rules that you must learn, before you can then decide to break them.

Fashion, just like art and music, has far fewer rules now than it used to - for the better part of the last century, all of those fields have experienced a softening of formality, the adoption of a more laissez faire approach.

However, whilst most rules about dressing have been softened or disappeared (no brown in town, for example - you'd be hard pressed to find anyone outside SF who knew anything about that) it is a fact that our clothing developed in a particular cultural milieu and it useful to know a bit about those things before you decide to start throwing things on with abandon.

Admittedly, clothing is less of a signifier here than it appears to be in London or in the NE United States, for example, but people still pick up on a well-fitting suit and a well co-ordinated outfit and therefore I think that it does make sense to educate oneself a bit about past and current practices.

I was lucky, in a way, as my father had some "off-the-row" suits that he'd had made for himself in the 1950s or 1960s, and my mother had a good collection of tailored garments from Australian places like Sportscraft from back when they actually made good stuff. They took the time to talk to me about colour combinations, about formal outfits and more outfits and other such things and so by the time I started reading fora like SF and Ask Andy I at least knew a bit already but I guess that there are probably some people around whose parents either did not know or did not care about tailored clothing and so they didn't have that sort of knowledge imparted to them.
post #25139 of 58049
And here we go again...
post #25140 of 58049
If the conversation is getting too intellectual for you, feel free to sit it out and visit our special needs affiliate, AAAC.
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