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Australian Members - Page 1509

post #22621 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Nice haul! Man! I've been eyeing that blue paisley tie for a long time - it's a perfect spring tie.

I'd been eyeing it off for a while, too, and finally took the plunge.

I'm wearing it today and have already received several compliments, including one from a colleague who said, "I don't normally like paisley but that tie is really nice!"
post #22622 of 57912
I don't normally repost blog posts, but I thought that this one at A Suitable Wardrobe might be of particular interest to some of us:
Quote:
Another View of the Case of Quality

My Peals in the photo above are finally legal. Exactly twenty-one years ago this month on a Saturday in New York I was carousing with some friends. My fashion mind-set at the time was just coming out of my Milan phase (not Milan-classic, which I still love, but Milan-runway, which was doomed to extinction almost as soon as the fashion show ended). Newly converted to the teachings of Flusser, but still with a young man’s aversion to ‘old-man’ stores like J. Press, Chipp, and Brooks, I cringed when my oldest friend, actually two years my junior but a fashion fogey since the day we met, dragged me into the Brooks flagship on Madison Ave.

It wasn’t what I expected. Immediately upon entering, there was this huge presentation case full of antique wristwatches, tie bars, and double-sided cufflinks. These were the accoutrement of the eighties Wall Street renaissance, and I loved them. But something at the back of the store was calling my name, loudly. I had to find out what it was.

The shoes were displayed on the back wall, but only one model stood out—shouted, actually--the fabled Peals Alan Flusser always wrote so reverently about.

The London custom shoe firm of Peal & Co. was founded in Durham, England, in 1565. It moved to Derby in 1765, then found its way to London in 1791. The firm closed its doors in 1965—get this: not because of falling demand, but for lack of skilled craftsmen (I believe family succession was also a problem). Had they continued, Peal would have been the oldest shoemaking firm in London, if not the world (Foster & Son, founded in 1840, is now London’s oldest firm; Lobb was founded in 1856). Their customers included Fred Astaire, Adolphe Menjou, the Duke of Windsor, his brother George VI, and legendary Esquire men’s fashion editor George Frazier (btw, does it not madden you when established firms boast customer lists of famous people who CAN’T dress? Not exactly what you’d call a ‘ringing endorsement,’ eh what?).

In 1953, Peal sold Brooks Brothers the right to produce & sell ready-to-wear shoes under the Peal name; when the firm closed in 1965 Brooks bought the remaining rights, along with the famous Peal lasts. Since that time, Brook’s Peals have been made by several shoemakers of note: Alfred Sargent, Alden, Edward Green, Crockett & Jones, etc. When I purchased my shoes in 1991, I had neither the knowledge nor sophistication to inquire as to their pedigree; all I cared about at the time was that I’d gotten my hands on a pair of drop-dead gorgeous kicks. In the years since I became curious, and was told by no less than an actual Edward Green cobbler that my shoes did indeed come out of their workshop.

The Peals at Brooks today are made by Crockett & Jones. It is a decent enough shoe; alas, it simply isn’t what it once was—a shoe that could easily pass for bespoke. Mind you, this is no bad reflection on Crockett & Jones; the fact that the shoe has a $585 price tag tells me that Brooks gave C & J certain price constraints to work with. To help you appreciate what kind of corners need to be cut, consider that Brooks Peals in 1991 were 500 bucks a pair (I was in the store just after the recession of 1990 hit; sales of the shoe were so low that at the time Brooks contemplated discontinuing Peals altogether. Thus, I was able to get my pair for the “closeout” price of $385).

To get the quality of ready-to-wear shoe I got, you now have to pay three times what I paid. And believe it or not it’ll be worth it, because in fifteen or twenty years you’ll be telling a story like I’m telling now. I know it’s difficult for some to imagine paying more than a thousand dollars for a single pair of r-t-w shoes, but let me assure you of one thing: the imaginations of the people at places like Cleverly, Lobb, Gatto, Edward Green, etc., have no such limitations. If the price of apples goes up, so will the price of good shoes. So don’t stand still. Consider that when I got off the train back in New Haven on that Saturday 21 years ago, I said to myself, “Did I really just spend $385 on one pair of shoes?” An amount that today might or might not pay the taxes on a pair of bespoke. My Peals weren’t a bargain to me then; at the time I thought I was royalty for wearing $225 Ferragamos. The idea that I’d outspent my Ferragamos by $150—for a pair of shoes that were on SALE—blew my mind at the time. I begged my shopping mates not to tell anyone back home what I’d spent. Seriously, I didn’t want to be committed.

Gives you a little bit of perspective, doesn’t it? At the moment of transaction, you will ALWAYS feel like you’re overpaying. You have to get over that moment—and wait. Like the purchase of stock, the dividends come later. The first year I owned the shoes, the ‘rental’ was the full purchase price--$385. Then it began to drop, to its present yearly rental of a mere eighteen bucks. And still falling. The catch, of course, is buying a pair of shoes that will last that long, and managing not to pass out when you first pay for them.

Incidentally, the above photo was taken just a few days ago. Yes, that really is a pair of twenty-one year old ready-made shoes (Twice a year they get an undercoating of navy shoe cream, over which I regularly use Saphir black wax-- creating my own ‘midnight blue’ effect, or at least trying to. I probably don’t clean them as often as I should, which is my way of saying I don’t remember the last time I cleaned them. In my own defense, I know plenty of guys who just pile layer after layer of wax on their shoes decade after decade, with nothing more than a light dusting after wearing, and their shoes look fantastic. One fellow, who acquired his skills in the military, calls it “shining the shine.” FYI, a problem you will have with shoes that last this long is dealing with that marvelous ‘foot spread’ that hits most of us around our fortieth birthday. There were times I thought I’d have to give my shoes away for tightness. Having shoes stretched by a local cobbler is a solution, but also a nuisance: it is a temporary measure, and I cringe when turning over my shoes to someone who might, to use the vernacular, ‘hump them up.’ As an alternative, an expert cobbler can resole the shoe, widening the uppers a bit as he does so. This tends to be very expensive. The perfect solution? Find a pair of trees just slightly wider than the shoes. My Peals now fit perfectly, every time).

Here I was going to say, “Imagine what kind of longevity you get when you buy bespoke.” But diligent fashion writer that I am, I will point out that while my shoes are turning 21, another pair, made for Prince Charles by you-know-who, is turning 41. And just as I’m still wearing my Peals, the prince is still wearing his Lobbs.

This, gentlemen, is another side of the ongoing argument about quality.

Words and photo by Barry Pullen
post #22623 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post


I had an Italian made Oroton wallet which saw some hard wear and all things considered it lasted pretty well. These days most if not all of their small leather goods are made in China, which is not so bad in and of itself, but the quality of the leather is not up to what it used to be.
I have a MIC Gowings wallet which I received as a gift that is better quality than the current Oroton equivalents.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

[quote name="Dusty Brogues" url="/t/88856/australian-members/22560#post_5943463
Are Oroton Wallets good quality?
[/quote]
IMMO No. Bought one four years ago and had to replace it last year. Not impressed, the leather did not hold up to day to day use.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


They used to be very good - I'm still using an Oroton "trifold" wallet that I bought 16 or 17 years ago and the outer leather has developed a fantastic patina over time. Unfortunately, the inner lining has worn away in a couple of areas and unless I can find someone to replace it, I'll have to get another wallet.
However, I've had a look at their more recent products over the past few years and, sadly, Oroton now largely seems to be a shadow of its former self. I don't know if they still manufacture in Australia (which they used to proudly proclaim) or whether they've shifted production offshore, but their wallets and most of their men's bags and briefcases look stiff, lifeless and not very well made, which is a great pity.

 

Thanks Gentlemen,

There is a Oroton outlet nearby, currently have 70% off stock, which is good buying, obviously the quality is the case in point. I might chase up that Brooks Brothers cordovan wallet which someone purchased on ASF recently, looked fantastic. I never here Bally mentioned on this thread, are they just another Hugo Boss of the world?

Journeyman +1 to your loot of Vanda silk goods, love that blue detailed PS!

post #22624 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


I'd been eyeing it off for a while, too, and finally took the plunge.
I'm wearing it today and have already received several compliments, including one from a colleague who said, "I don't normally like paisley but that tie is really nice!"

 

Nice man - i like the Vanda products!

 

I find the tie length about 5-10cm too short for my liking though but thats because Gerald prefers a single FIH knot and hes shorter than me so i have to go custom length

post #22625 of 57912
Solly Lew trying to out-stupid Gerry Harvey...

Retail company Premier Investments says the lack of GST on overseas online purchases under $1000 is seriously harming Australian businesses.

Chairman Solomon Lew told the company's annual general meeting in Melbourne that the retail sector had been facing tough trading conditions for the past two years, caused by both cyclical and structural issues.

However, the retailer, which includes the Peter Alexander and Just Jeans brands, still managed to make a profit of $68.2 million for the 2012 fiscal year, up 68 per cent on the previous year.

Mr Lew called for the federal government to take immediate action to lower the $1000 low value threshold n which GST is collected on goods purchased from overseas.
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"My message to the government is that we have all run out of time," he told shareholders.

"Change needs to be made right now, and if the government needs any further proof of what's at stake, I have one word for them - jobs." Unless the threshold was lowered, 30,000 retail jobs would be lost over the next three years,'' Mr Lew said.
post #22626 of 57912
Profits up 68 per cent.

Better slash some jobs.
post #22627 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Indeed, thou weedy toad-spotted pignut!

(courtesy of http://www.pangloss.com/seidel/Shaker/)

Big nose.
post #22628 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

Profits up 68 per cent.
Better slash some jobs.

Precisely. There seems to be some sort of logical disconnection happening there.
post #22629 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty Brogues View Post



Thanks Gentlemen,
There is a Oroton outlet nearby, currently have 70% off stock, which is good buying, obviously the quality is the case in point. I might chase up that Brooks Brothers cordovan wallet which someone purchased on ASF recently, looked fantastic. I never here Bally mentioned on this thread, are they just another Hugo Boss of the world?
Journeyman +1 to your loot of Vanda silk goods, love that blue detailed PS!

One option for the BB Cordovan wallet is the Boxing Day sale I got one last year at a great price.
post #22630 of 57912
New wheels have arrived.

Alden for Brooks Brothers tassel loafer, brown calf.

Pics to follow soon.
post #22631 of 57912
The former genius at DJs contributes to the gst debate...

Premier chief executive Mark McInnes agreed, calling the loophole "an appaling piece of government policy".

These people annoy me more than they should.
post #22632 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

The former genius at DJs contributes to the gst debate...
Premier chief executive Mark McInnes agreed, calling the loophole "an appaling piece of government policy".
These people annoy me more than they should.

He probably said the same thing about the sexual harassment laws.
post #22633 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

New wheels have arrived.
Alden for Brooks Brothers tassel loafer, brown calf.
Pics to follow soon.

Nice. I'm wearing tassel loafers today. Beautiful day in Sydney so why not?
post #22634 of 57912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post

He probably said the same thing about the sexual harassment laws.

Haha... Sticky fingers indeed!
post #22635 of 57912

OMG! Now this thread has started talking about the use of the word 'gay'. What happened to the quality of this thread!? Some of the members are seriously degrading the quality of this thread.

If you can't afford to be gay, just don't ask about the value of being gay.

JESUS CHRIST!

-------------

Sorry, just having a Starry moment :).

The joke is never going to get old :D.

------------

 

Rob, I am going to take some photos and do a little bit of a write up on Elite, when I get the time (harder than it sounds).

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